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Christopher Thornberg

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BUSINESS
April 26, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Christopher Thornberg is founding partner of Beacon Economics, a Los Angeles-based economics consulting firm. Since its founding in 2007, Beacon has provided economic analysis and forecasting for cities, counties and corporate clients. He also worked as chief economic advisor to the state Controller's Office from 2008 to 2012. While he was at the UCLA Anderson Forecast, he began sounding the alarm about an impending housing market crash - and the ensuing recession.
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BUSINESS
April 26, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Christopher Thornberg is founding partner of Beacon Economics, a Los Angeles-based economics consulting firm. Since its founding in 2007, Beacon has provided economic analysis and forecasting for cities, counties and corporate clients. He also worked as chief economic advisor to the state Controller's Office from 2008 to 2012. While he was at the UCLA Anderson Forecast, he began sounding the alarm about an impending housing market crash - and the ensuing recession.
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BUSINESS
March 30, 2012 | By Marla Dickerson
Economists generally don't go into politics, which is probably a good thing for Christopher Thornberg , who has declared war on Proposition 13 . The popular 1978 ballot measure that capped property taxes in California is “one of the most horrendous, unfair, regressive taxes in the history of the United States,” the former UCLA economist declared at a televised hearing in Sacramento earlier this month. (You can view it here , starting at about 31:36 minutes.) Zap!
BUSINESS
March 30, 2012 | By Marla Dickerson
Economists generally don't go into politics, which is probably a good thing for Christopher Thornberg , who has declared war on Proposition 13 . The popular 1978 ballot measure that capped property taxes in California is “one of the most horrendous, unfair, regressive taxes in the history of the United States,” the former UCLA economist declared at a televised hearing in Sacramento earlier this month. (You can view it here , starting at about 31:36 minutes.) Zap!
BUSINESS
August 15, 2006 | Roger Vincent, Times Staff Writer
Bearish real estate economist Christopher Thornberg, who says the Southern California housing market is a bubble beginning to pop, has left UCLA Anderson Forecast to strike out on his own. Thornberg, 38, will continue to teach economics at UCLA but will no longer be part of the quarterly Anderson Forecast on the economies of California and the nation. "I wanted to start my own business and do things I wasn't able to do before," said Thornberg.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2009 | Steve Lopez
So here I am at the Beverly Center, looking at a pair of $228 jeans from Bloomingdale's, and I can't remember my duty as an American: Am I supposed to buy these overpriced trousers and everything else in sight to help fuel the economic recovery? FOR THE RECORD: Steve Lopez column: In Wednesday's Section A, Steve Lopez's column referred to the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. —where Jack Kyser is chief economist -- as the Los Angeles Economic Development Council.
OPINION
August 25, 2007
Mortgage: Christopher Thornberg's Op-Ed piece on Friday about Fannie Mae (the Federal National Mortgage Assn.) and Freddie Mac (the Federal Home Loan and Mortgage Corp.) said that Fannie Mae had been around for nearly 60 years. It has been nearly 70 years since it was formed in 1938.
OPINION
September 1, 2007
Re "Fannie and Freddie, old and new," Opinion, Aug. 24 In his conclusion to an otherwise informative article, Christopher Thornberg resorts to advocating a very untenable position. He strangely claims that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have become the opposite of what they were because they are now part of the safe market. Fannie and Freddie have always been part of the safe market. They provided liquidity, but not for speculative or risky mortgage seekers, only for the creditworthy ones.
REAL ESTATE
September 18, 2005 | From Times staff writers
Will the real estate bubble burst? And, if so, when? Those were the big questions at a UCLA Anderson School of Management conference on real estate and the California economy, held Thursday at the Skirball Cultural Center in West L.A. The answers are not that simple, a bearish Christopher Thornberg, senior economist of the UCLA Anderson Forecast, told housing developers, lenders, academics and representatives of affordable housing programs.
BUSINESS
August 11, 2007 | Annette Haddad, Andrea Chang and Daniel Yi, Times Staff Writers
The sub-prime mortgage pain convulsing financial markets is nothing new to people who make their livings in real estate and the housing construction industry. For months, the deteriorating market has been taking money out of millions of workers' pockets. Real estate agents are selling fewer homes. Appraisers and construction workers are scrambling for assignments. Mortgage loan company employees are being laid off by the thousands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2009 | Steve Lopez
So here I am at the Beverly Center, looking at a pair of $228 jeans from Bloomingdale's, and I can't remember my duty as an American: Am I supposed to buy these overpriced trousers and everything else in sight to help fuel the economic recovery? FOR THE RECORD: Steve Lopez column: In Wednesday's Section A, Steve Lopez's column referred to the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. —where Jack Kyser is chief economist -- as the Los Angeles Economic Development Council.
BUSINESS
August 15, 2006 | Roger Vincent, Times Staff Writer
Bearish real estate economist Christopher Thornberg, who says the Southern California housing market is a bubble beginning to pop, has left UCLA Anderson Forecast to strike out on his own. Thornberg, 38, will continue to teach economics at UCLA but will no longer be part of the quarterly Anderson Forecast on the economies of California and the nation. "I wanted to start my own business and do things I wasn't able to do before," said Thornberg.
BUSINESS
April 15, 2014 | By Andrew Khouri
Most Californians can't afford their rent. The state's affordability crisis has worsened since the recession, as soaring home prices and rents outpace job and income growth. Meanwhile, government funds to combat the problem have evaporated. Local redevelopment agencies once generated roughly $1 billion annually for below-market housing across California, but the roughly 400 agencies closed in 2012 to ease a state budget crisis. In addition, almost $5 billion from state below-market housing bonds, approved by voters last decade, is nearly gone.
REAL ESTATE
March 28, 2004 | From Times wire reports
At current double-digit rates of appreciation, Los Angeles housing prices are rising at a faster pace than can be sustained, , UCLA senior economist Christopher F. Thornberg warns. In the UCLA Anderson Forecast released last week, he noted that most of the appreciation in Los Angeles housing prices, up until the middle of 2003, was largely justified by a tight housing market and falling interest rates.
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