Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsChristy Brown
IN THE NEWS

Christy Brown

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1989 | SHEILA BENSON, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Who goes to the movies for moral uplift? You want moral uplift, go to the Ice Capades. So don't think that seeing "My Left Foot" (at the AMC Century 14) wins you some kind of spiritual merit badge. This one you see for the pure love of great movie making. Its tough-minded, unsentimental writing and ferociously brilliant acting--across the board and especially at the top--manage to give a pretty good idea of what Christy Brown, the Dublin-born writer, poet and painter, was all about.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
September 7, 2012
Re "Gray Davis on Brown vs. Christie," Sept. 5 Who cares if Gov. Jerry Brown can beat New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie in a physical fitness contest? A top-quality governor would win a "fiscal fitness" contest. Brown being physically fit is not going to help California one iota. In a fiscal fitness matchup, Christie would come out way ahead of Brown. Lea Osborne Woodland Hills ALSO: Letters: Clinton stirs the Democrats Letters: Driver's licenses for all Californians Letters: Don't make truants come to school
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1989 | SEAN MITCHELL
It's hard to imagine a more unglamorous movie role than the one of Christy Brown, the late Irish writer and painter whose muscles were so affected by cerebral palsy that he could barely speak or move without great physical effort, sometimes accompanied by spasms, grunts and spitting.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Foot Art to Be Auctioned: A collection of paintings by disabled artist Christy Brown, the subject of the Oscar-winning film "My Left Foot," will be auctioned by Christie's on Dec. 12 in Dublin. Brown, who had cerebral palsy and began painting with his left foot at 12, wrote the autobiography on which last year's film was based. Seventeen of Brown's paintings are up for sale and are expected to bring more than $35,000. Brown died in 1981.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1990 | SHEILA BENSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who goes to the movies for moral uplift? You want moral uplift, go to the Ice Capades. So don't think that seeing "My Left Foot" (at Horton Plaza) wins you some kind of spiritual merit badge. This one you see for the pure love of great movie making. Its tough-minded, unsentimental writing and ferociously brilliant acting--across the board and especially at the top--manage to give a pretty good idea of what Christy Brown, the Dublin-born writer, poet and painter, was all about.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Foot Art to Be Auctioned: A collection of paintings by disabled artist Christy Brown, the subject of the Oscar-winning film "My Left Foot," will be auctioned by Christie's on Dec. 12 in Dublin. Brown, who had cerebral palsy and began painting with his left foot at 12, wrote the autobiography on which last year's film was based. Seventeen of Brown's paintings are up for sale and are expected to bring more than $35,000. Brown died in 1981.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The normally publicity-shy British actor Daniel Day-Lewis, who portrays Irish artist Christy Brown in the critically acclaimed film "My Left Foot," plans to be in Washington today to show his support for legislation to end discrimination against disabled people.
OPINION
September 7, 2012
Re "Gray Davis on Brown vs. Christie," Sept. 5 Who cares if Gov. Jerry Brown can beat New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie in a physical fitness contest? A top-quality governor would win a "fiscal fitness" contest. Brown being physically fit is not going to help California one iota. In a fiscal fitness matchup, Christie would come out way ahead of Brown. Lea Osborne Woodland Hills ALSO: Letters: Clinton stirs the Democrats Letters: Driver's licenses for all Californians Letters: Don't make truants come to school
BOOKS
February 18, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
In his celebrated autobiography, handicapped author Christie Brown portrays himself as a more gentle and thoughtful figure than the bibulous scamp in Jim Sheridan's Oscar-nominated film. Without playing on the reader's sympathy, Brown describes how he learned to paint and write with his left foot, the only limb he could control. The most poignant chapters of the book focus on Brown's adolescence, when he "discovered" his handicap.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1989 | CYNTHIA GORNEY, THE WASHINGTON POST
"The evening was sort of darkening," Daniel Day-Lewis says. "And it was a very white script," he said, that glowed on the doormat of his London home. "So it was kind of magical," he says. "Normally you get some kind of accompanying explanation, a letter, or a phone call . . . but this just came." His smile broadens. "And on the front of this phosphorescent white paper was written, "My Left Foot.' I was captured by the title.
BOOKS
February 18, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
In his celebrated autobiography, handicapped author Christie Brown portrays himself as a more gentle and thoughtful figure than the bibulous scamp in Jim Sheridan's Oscar-nominated film. Without playing on the reader's sympathy, Brown describes how he learned to paint and write with his left foot, the only limb he could control. The most poignant chapters of the book focus on Brown's adolescence, when he "discovered" his handicap.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The normally publicity-shy British actor Daniel Day-Lewis, who portrays Irish artist Christy Brown in the critically acclaimed film "My Left Foot," plans to be in Washington today to show his support for legislation to end discrimination against disabled people.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1990 | SHEILA BENSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who goes to the movies for moral uplift? You want moral uplift, go to the Ice Capades. So don't think that seeing "My Left Foot" (at Horton Plaza) wins you some kind of spiritual merit badge. This one you see for the pure love of great movie making. Its tough-minded, unsentimental writing and ferociously brilliant acting--across the board and especially at the top--manage to give a pretty good idea of what Christy Brown, the Dublin-born writer, poet and painter, was all about.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1989 | SEAN MITCHELL
It's hard to imagine a more unglamorous movie role than the one of Christy Brown, the late Irish writer and painter whose muscles were so affected by cerebral palsy that he could barely speak or move without great physical effort, sometimes accompanied by spasms, grunts and spitting.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1989 | SHEILA BENSON, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Who goes to the movies for moral uplift? You want moral uplift, go to the Ice Capades. So don't think that seeing "My Left Foot" (at the AMC Century 14) wins you some kind of spiritual merit badge. This one you see for the pure love of great movie making. Its tough-minded, unsentimental writing and ferociously brilliant acting--across the board and especially at the top--manage to give a pretty good idea of what Christy Brown, the Dublin-born writer, poet and painter, was all about.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1990
Cinema Messages As a disabled person, I am concerned about the perceptions carried away from "Born on the Fourth of July," which won Academy Awards for best director and best editing. As I left the theater after seeing this movie, I felt dirty and pathetic. I never realized how miserable I was. I am not a veteran. I have multiple sclerosis and am in a wheelchair. People often assume my life is more dismal than it really is. This movie reinforces that notion. By contrast, when I saw "My Left Foot" I felt I could do anything.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Wachovia Corp. Chief Executive Kennedy Thompson, under fire for buying Oakland-based Golden West Financial Corp. as the housing market peaked in 2006, was stripped of his role as chairman of the fourth-largest U.S. bank. Lanty Smith will become nonexecutive chairman, Charlotte, N.C.-based Wachovia said. Thompson, 57, remains on the board and retains full management responsibility, spokeswoman Christy Phillips Brown said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|