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Chromium

HEALTH
November 21, 2005
Chromium is an essential trace mineral found in a variety of foods, including whole grains, cereals, spices (such as black pepper), broccoli, mushrooms, cheese, seafood and meat. In the body, it plays a role in metabolizing fats and carbohydrates and controlling blood levels of sugar. The body has a hard time absorbing chromium supplements in mineral form; it is absorbed more easily when it's bound to another molecule.
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HEALTH
January 12, 2004 | Elena Conis
Chromium is an essential element that helps break down fats and cholesterol and regulates insulin, the hormone that controls blood sugar. The mineral is found in whole grains, seafood, coffee, tea, meat and brewer's yeast, and deficiency is rare. Chromium supplements are sold in several forms -- including chromium chloride, chromium nicotinate and, most commonly, chromium picolinate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
An electroplating shop pleaded guilty to dumping chromium-contaminated wastewater into the city sewer system in violation of the federal Clean Water Act. The Neal Feay Co. shop generates large amounts of wastewater. The felony and misdemeanor pleas were entered this week in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, Assistant U.S. Atty. Debra Yank said. U.S. District Judge Audrey B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2003 | Miguel Bustillo, Times Staff Writer
Erin Brockovich played the role of star witness Friday as California lawmakers examined evidence strongly suggesting that her old nemesis, Pacific Gas & Electric Co., commandeered a supposedly impartial state scientific panel that downplayed the health risks of the pollutant chromium 6. The panel's report was one of the factors California cited in 2001 when it announced it was withdrawing a stricter public health goal it had proposed for chromium 6. Chromium 6 is a known carcinogen when inhaled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2003 | Julie Tamaki, Times Staff Writer
Ground water contaminated with the pollutant chromium 6 has migrated near wells and water-treatment facilities that serve Burbank, Glendale and Los Angeles, underscoring the need for federal regulators to lead a cleanup effort, a new report concludes. The document further warns that inaction by the federal Environmental Protection Agency could result in the closure of water-cleansing wells and thus cause the three cities to lose a valuable local water supply.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2002 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Removal of chromium 6, arsenic and other pollutants from county-owned drinking-water wells in northern Los Angeles County would cost $315 million if aggressively implemented, according to a report released Wednesday by the county Department of Public Works. The review was ordered by county supervisors at the request of Supervisor Mike Antonovich after more than two dozen wells in the Santa Clarita and Antelope valleys tested positive for higher-than-normal concentrations of chromium 6.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2001 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Glendale City Council decision to raise the allowable limit of chromium 6 in drinking water might not end a 15-month battle pitting the city against federal officials and the San Fernando Valley water master, officials said Wednesday. The council voted 3 to 1 on Tuesday night to raise the chromium limit from 1 part per billion to 3 ppb. It took the action because a state agency found last month that there was insufficient evidence to label the water unsafe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2001 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state agency withdrew its effort Friday to limit chromium in drinking water, acknowledging that its initial risk assessment was flawed and said a future recommendation will focus on the chemical's toxic byproduct, chromium 6. Officials of the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment said they acted on advice from a University of California panel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2001 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city of Glendale will receive $750,000 from the federal government to build a treatment plant to remove chromium 6 and other toxic heavy metals from local drinking water wells, two California congressional leaders announced Thursday. Although Glendale officials originally sought $300,000, U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer and Rep.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2001 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A scientific panel examining the health risks of chromium 6 in water said Friday that state officials should not toughen standards for the chemical until after a national study is completed several years from now. The Chromate Toxicity Review Committee disputed a 1999 recommendation by the state Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment that the drinking water goal for total chromium--to limit chromium 6--be lowered to 2.5 parts per billion from 50 ppb.
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