Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsChromosomes
IN THE NEWS

Chromosomes

FEATURED ARTICLES
SCIENCE
April 3, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Scientists have completed the final analysis of two more human chromosomes. Chromosome 19 with nearly 1,500 genes, including some linked to high cholesterol and insulin-resistant diabetes, is the most gene-dense of those sequenced. By contrast, chromosome 13 has one of the lowest concentrations of genes with only 633. But they include the BRCA2 gene linked to breast cancer and others linked to bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
March 29, 2014 | By Monte Morin
Scientists say they have created a "designer chromosome" in brewer's yeast that will mutate on command. In a study published this week in Science , researchers said they had successfully "synthesized" one of the 16 chromosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae -- a workhorse fungi that is used in myriad industrial processes, including making bread, brewing beer, producing biofuel and manufacturing vaccines. "We have a yeast that looks, smells and behaves like a regular yeast, but this yeast is endowed with properties normal yeast don't have," said lead study scientist Jef Boeke, director of the NYU Langone Medical Center's Institute for Systems Genetics.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 2, 1998 | From Reuters
Japanese scientists said Friday they had built an artificial chromosome, which might aid efforts to use gene therapy to treat diseases such as muscular dystrophy and cystic fibrosis. Hiroshi Masumoto of Nagoya University in Japan and colleagues said they hope their chromosome might be used to deliver some form of gene therapy. Every human cell contains 46 chromosomes. These, in turn, carry the genes. Everyone has some "defective" genes, but some defects have more serious effects than others.
SCIENCE
February 26, 2014 | By Monte Morin
It's billed as a faster, safer and more accurate way of screening expectant mothers for fetal abnormalities like Down syndrome, and proponents say it has already become the standard for prenatal care. But as a handful of California companies market their DNA-testing services to a growing number of pregnant women, some experts complain that the tests have not been proven effective in the kind of rigorous clinical trials that are required of new drugs. Now, a study published Wednesday by the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine has verified that one of the tests can identify likely cases of Down syndrome and other genetic disorders caused by extra chromosomes in low-risk women with greater reliability than traditional noninvasive screening methods.
NEWS
April 1, 1997 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
In a major milestone in the study of human heredity, researchers announced Monday that they have created the first artificial human chromosome, which experts said represents a quantum leap in the ability to probe the complex molecules that make up humankind. The new technology offers scientists a powerful new research tool for investigating fundamental questions about the chemistry responsible for human heredity, experts said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1987 | ROBERT BUDERI, Buderi is a free-lance writer based in Cambridge, Mass., and studied science as a Bush Fellow at MIT. and
Open the "mammals" file on David Page's computer and out spill charts and graphs bearing entries for a hodgepodge of creatures--goats, mice, chimps and humans--which have some chromosomal defect that has affected their sexual development. And that information is helping Page answer a question that has long puzzled mankind: What determines sex?
NEWS
May 26, 1995 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Moving closer in the search for human roots, three scientists today offered new genetic evidence that all men are descended from a common ancestor who lived about 270,000 years ago, lending some support to the theory that modern humanity evolved in Africa a relatively short time ago. For the first time, researchers at Yale, Harvard and the University of Chicago have traced the genetic roots of the human family through the male line, by analyzing the Y chromosome that makes an embryo become male.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1995
Scientists take sample chromosomes from 38 men from every continent in the world to find "virtually no differences" and exclaim a discovery (May 26)? Women call it validation! MARY ALICE ALTORFER Santa Maria
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1998
As I hydroplaned to work last Tuesday morning in the torrential downpour, with visibility only Mr. Magoo could appreciate, 19 cars without headlights on passed me. Without exception, each car was driven by a man. Coincidence or chromosomes? SHARIE LIEBERG Oxnard
NEWS
October 24, 2012 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Scientists have demonstrated a new type of gene therapy that would - in principle - allow mothers to avoid saddling their children with rare diseases that could result in heart problems, dementia, diabetes, deafness and other significant health issues. The disorders in question are all due to mutations in one of the 37 genes in our mitochondrial DNA. “Mitochondria are structures within cells that convert the energy from food into a form that cells can use,” according to this explainer from the NIH's National Library of Medicine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2013 | Cynthia Dizikes
When Janet Rowley was accepted into the University of Chicago's medical school in 1944, the quota for women was already filled - three in a class of 65. So she had to wait a year. Dr. Rowley made up for that early setback by becoming an internationally known scientist whose research in the 1970s redefined cancer as a genetic disease and led to a paradigm shift in how it is studied and treated. An advisor to presidents and recipient of her nation's highest honors, Rowley achieved breakthroughs that prolonged the lives of countless cancer patients.
SCIENCE
July 26, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Half zebra and half donkey, the fuzzy little zonkey named Ippo was born one week ago on an animal reserve near Florence, Italy. The zonkey is not the brainchild of some deranged Dr. Moreau-like figure trying to put two animals of a different species together, but rather is the product of good old-fashioned natural lust. In an interview with the Italian news channel RTV38 (which you can see above), a member of the family that owns the reserve described a romantic love affair between a female donkey and a male zebra that was adopted after it was confiscated from a failing zoo. The zebra probably jumped the metal fence that separated the two animals to mate with the neighboring donkey.
NEWS
October 24, 2012 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Scientists have demonstrated a new type of gene therapy that would - in principle - allow mothers to avoid saddling their children with rare diseases that could result in heart problems, dementia, diabetes, deafness and other significant health issues. The disorders in question are all due to mutations in one of the 37 genes in our mitochondrial DNA. “Mitochondria are structures within cells that convert the energy from food into a form that cells can use,” according to this explainer from the NIH's National Library of Medicine.
NEWS
July 6, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
Scientists can now sequence the entire genome of a fetus from samples of a pregnant woman's blood, several recent studies have shown. It will come as no surprise that bioethicists are plenty interested in these developments and the benefits and thorny issues they will raise. The technology -- and the issues -- are discussed at length in a commentary this week in the journal Nature Medicine by Diana Bianchi of the Mother Infant Research Institute at Tufts Medical Center. Because a pregnant woman's blood carries pieces of fetal DNA, researchers can devise tests to tell with a high degree of certainty whether the fetus carries extra chromosomes (as an extra chromosome 21 in Down syndrome, for example)
HEALTH
February 3, 2011 | By Amber Dance, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Women may soon be able to find out very early in their pregnancies whether they are carrying a fetus with Down syndrome by offering a simple blood sample. The safe, noninvasive test would pose fewer risks to the mother and fetus than amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling (CVS), the two tests currently used for prenatal diagnosis. It would also give women more time to decide what to do if a diagnosis of Down syndrome is made. Researchers from the Chinese University of Hong Kong have been working on the DNA-based test for a decade.
NEWS
November 8, 2010 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
The evidence for bisphenol A's negative health effects keeps piling up. In a study released Monday in the Proceeding of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at the Harvard Medical School reported that the chemical interferes with reproduction in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans . Scientists had already shown that bisphenol A, which is used in many plastics and in the linings of food cans , is associated with...
SCIENCE
July 26, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Half zebra and half donkey, the fuzzy little zonkey named Ippo was born one week ago on an animal reserve near Florence, Italy. The zonkey is not the brainchild of some deranged Dr. Moreau-like figure trying to put two animals of a different species together, but rather is the product of good old-fashioned natural lust. In an interview with the Italian news channel RTV38 (which you can see above), a member of the family that owns the reserve described a romantic love affair between a female donkey and a male zebra that was adopted after it was confiscated from a failing zoo. The zebra probably jumped the metal fence that separated the two animals to mate with the neighboring donkey.
MAGAZINE
August 9, 1992
I wonder if Morrison would support a tax on gratuitous male bashers. For the sake of equity, we could set it at $100, payable in Susan B. Anthony dollars, of course. Or perhaps feminists and their acolytes should decamp to some remote island fumigated for Y chromosomes where they could be free at last from those beastly males. There would, of course, be yearly visits by carefully screened men--to move the furniture and fix the plumbing. STEVEN PENCALL Whittier
HEALTH
March 2, 2009 | Cathryn Delude
Wrinkles may betray our age externally, but our cells divulge their age -- and chronicle life's toll -- at the tips of our chromosomes. These tips, called telomeres, may also foretell our risk of early death. Telomeres are the protective caps made of repetitive chunks of DNA that keep the rest of the gene-laden chromosome from disastrously unraveling. But they lose bits of themselves with each cell division, so over a lifetime, like a counter, telomeres shorten.
SCIENCE
September 3, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The human Y chromosome -- the DNA chunk that makes a man a man -- has lost so many genes over time that some scientists have suspected it might disappear in 10 million years. But a new study says it'll stick around. Researchers found no sign of gene loss over the last 6 million years, suggesting the chromosome is "doing a pretty good job of maintaining itself," said researcher David Page of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research in Cambridge, Mass.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|