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Chromosomes

NEWS
February 22, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
An emerging technique called chromosome mapping could lead to the deciphering of the human genetic code, and such information could help researchers understand and perhaps develop new treatments for many hereditary diseases. "We're learning things already that we couldn't have anticipated," Charles Cantor of Columbia University in New York said last week at the annual meeting of the American Assn. for the Advancement of Science in Chicago.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1997 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A team headquartered at UCLA and Cedars-Sinai Research Institute has narrowed the search for a gene causing the mysterious autoimmune disease lupus to a small region of the vast human genome. The finding should lead to better understanding of the causes of the disorder and eventually, to new treatments. Lupus affects as many as 2 million Americans, according to the Lupus Foundation of America.
NEWS
May 19, 1998 | PATT MORRISON
Just as Your Legislature at Work has decided to continue a program permitting intersection cameras to catch red light runners. . . . . . . . comes a study from the Department of Health in San Francisco, where red light cameras are effective, but so expensive the city's installed fakes at some intersections. The cameras--real or faux--may make drivers mind their Ps and Qs, but the study found that much of the bad conduct comes down to Xs and Ys, as in chromosomes.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2001 | FRAZIER MOORE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mike Binder has his fellow men figured out. They are pigs. Babies. Y-chromosome amnesiacs unconcerned with putting the toilet seat down. Men are lost souls in relationships as they mess up what they have in the pursuit of more. They are fragile heroes with raging ids propelled by fantasies and Viagra. How could anybody fail to feel men's pain? Or, anyway, laugh ruefully at it? Behold "The Mind of the Married Man," Binder's brash new comedy premiering Sunday at 10 p.m.on HBO. Yo, men! Gotcha!
BOOKS
January 18, 2004 | Robert Lee Hotz, Robert Lee Hotz is a science writer for The Times.
The literature of science offers no more brazen invitation than the opening paragraphs of a new book on the molecular biology of sex by London geneticist Steve Jones. "Ejaculate, if you are so minded and equipped, into a glass of chilled Perrier," he begins.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1990 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Salk Institute has received a $10-million federal grant, making it one of a handful of institutions with responsibility for mapping an entire human chromosome. Including this grant, more than $17 million has been committed by the National Institutes of Health and the U.S. Department of Energy to such research at Salk during the past few years. The efforts are part of a massive federal project to delineate the entire genetic code, or genome.
NEWS
November 24, 1996 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Defying what some believed to be insurmountable odds, researchers have narrowed the search for a prostate cancer gene to one small corner of the human genetic blueprint, a finding that promises improved diagnosis, new treatments and better survival rates for this most common of male cancers. An estimated 317,000 American men are diagnosed with prostate cancer each year and 40,000 die from it.
NEWS
April 14, 2000 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marking another milestone on the way to deciphering the entire human genetic code, U.S. Department of Energy scientists announced Thursday that they have completed "working drafts" of three human chromosomes. The 10,000 to 15,000 genes on these chromosomes include several known to be linked to serious diseases, including leukemia, high blood pressure, prostate cancer and diabetes. It is hoped that the detailed mapping of these genes will lead to new treatments for the disorders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1998 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Jack Brans does not recall his childhood fondly. The New Orleans resident had difficulty concentrating in school and was often disruptive. Frequently depressed, he underwent sharp, violent mood swings. At puberty, he grew breasts. "When we played any game 'shirts and skins,' I always tried very hard to be shirts," he said. "Gym was a nightmare." Ugly varicose veins on his legs meant that he always wore long pants and long socks, never shorts.
NEWS
May 30, 1997 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Japanese geneticists have for the first time transferred huge quantities of human DNA into mice, a feat that could eventually lead to new ways for producing human proteins effective against a broad variety of diseases. Although researchers have previously been able to introduce human DNA containing a few genes into mice, the Japanese team reports today in the journal Nature Genetics that it was able to insert a whole human chromosome containing more than 1,000 genes.
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