Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsChronic Fatigue Syndrome
IN THE NEWS

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 11, 2011 | By Trine Tsouderos, Chicago Tribune / For the Booster Shots blog
Researchers who remain convinced that a retrovirus is linked to chronic fatigue syndrome say they have proof their findings are correct, dismissing a recent comprehensive study that found no evidence of the link. That paper, published last week in the Journal of Virology by a team led by University of Utah researcher Dr. Ila R. Singh, is just the latest in a long line of studies conducted by scientists who have looked for evidence of the retrovirus XMRV in the blood of chronic fatigue syndrome patients but failed to find any. The scientific community’s consensus is that the original findings, reported in the journal Science in 2009, likely were the result of lab contamination, not a real infection in people.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
September 30, 2011 | By Jay A. Levy and Daniel L. Peterson
For more than 100 years, medical literature has contained reports of a debilitating illness that causes prolonged fatigue, memory loss, headaches, cognitive problems and issues with digestion and sleep. Teddy Roosevelt, John Muir and Thomas Eakins all suffered from what was then known as neurasthenia. At that time, the recommended treatment for women was bed rest; men were advised to head to the Wild West. But neither treatment could be counted on to cure the disease. Toward the end of the 20th century, doctors came up with the term chronic fatigue syndrome (or, in Europe, myalgic encephalomyelitis)
Advertisement
NEWS
September 22, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
At first, it looked like a breakthrough in the fight against chronic fatigue syndrome. Researchers said they found a mouse retrovirus called XMRV in the 68% of blood samples collected from 101 patients with chronic fatigue syndrome , while only 4% of blood samples from 218 healthy controls had evidence of the same virus. The research team said it was strong evidence that XMRV had something to do with causing chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). The report had added credibility because it was published in the prestigious journal Science.
NEWS
September 22, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
At first, it looked like a breakthrough in the fight against chronic fatigue syndrome. Researchers said they found a mouse retrovirus called XMRV in the 68% of blood samples collected from 101 patients with chronic fatigue syndrome , while only 4% of blood samples from 218 healthy controls had evidence of the same virus. The research team said it was strong evidence that XMRV had something to do with causing chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). The report had added credibility because it was published in the prestigious journal Science.
OPINION
September 30, 2011 | By Jay A. Levy and Daniel L. Peterson
For more than 100 years, medical literature has contained reports of a debilitating illness that causes prolonged fatigue, memory loss, headaches, cognitive problems and issues with digestion and sleep. Teddy Roosevelt, John Muir and Thomas Eakins all suffered from what was then known as neurasthenia. At that time, the recommended treatment for women was bed rest; men were advised to head to the Wild West. But neither treatment could be counted on to cure the disease. Toward the end of the 20th century, doctors came up with the term chronic fatigue syndrome (or, in Europe, myalgic encephalomyelitis)
HEALTH
May 24, 2010 | By Diane Shipley, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome meant I was exhausted all the time. I felt like I had cotton candy where a brain should be. Embarrassingly for a former English major, I lost words, even simple ones. "You know, those things! They go on feet!" I'd cry, frustrated. "Shoes?" my mom would ask. "Socks?" I also lost my life as I knew it. One week I had a full college load, my nights spent clubbing or writing essays, surviving on caffeine and chocolate. The next, I became so exhausted pulling on pantyhose that I had to lie down for an hour.
NEWS
September 9, 2010
Teenagers with chronic fatigue syndrome may push themselves too hard, which contributes to ongoing fatigue, claim the authors of a new study.   Researchers followed 301 adolescents with mononucleosis, which often precedes chronic fatigue syndrome in teens. They diagnosed 39 teens with chronic fatigue syndrome six months after the mononucleosis diagnosis. That group of adolescents was compared with 39 of the youths who had mononucleosis but who had recovered fully after six months.
NEWS
October 25, 2010
A new study casts further doubt on the role of a retrovirus, XMRV, in human disease, adding weight to the possibility that earlier studies finding a link between the virus and cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome may have been wrong. In the study, researchers from the National Cancer Institute and Johns Hopkins Medicine report being unable to find any evidence of the retrovirus in nearly 800 prostate cancer samples. "It is possible that XMRV is not actually circulating in the human population," the team wrote in its paper published by the journal Cancer Research last week.
NEWS
May 6, 2011 | By Trine Tsouderos, Chicago Tribune / For the Booster Shots blog
This post has been corrected. See note at bottom for details. The news this week was not good for those banking on a link between the retrovirus XMRV and chronic fatigue syndrome. A much-awaited study — arguably the most comprehensive search for evidence of XMRV in the blood of chronic fatigue syndrome patients to date — was published Wednesday in the Journal of Virology. That study, which examined the blood of 100 patients and 200 healthy peers, found no evidence of the retrovirus in anybody’s blood.
SCIENCE
October 9, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
In what may prove to be the first major breakthrough in the fight against the mysterious and controversial disorder known as chronic fatigue syndrome, researchers reported today that they have found traces of a virus in the vast majority of patients with the disease, commonly known as CFS. The same virus has previously been identified in at least a quarter of prostate tumors, particularly those that are very aggressive, and has also been linked...
NEWS
May 11, 2011 | By Trine Tsouderos, Chicago Tribune / For the Booster Shots blog
Researchers who remain convinced that a retrovirus is linked to chronic fatigue syndrome say they have proof their findings are correct, dismissing a recent comprehensive study that found no evidence of the link. That paper, published last week in the Journal of Virology by a team led by University of Utah researcher Dr. Ila R. Singh, is just the latest in a long line of studies conducted by scientists who have looked for evidence of the retrovirus XMRV in the blood of chronic fatigue syndrome patients but failed to find any. The scientific community’s consensus is that the original findings, reported in the journal Science in 2009, likely were the result of lab contamination, not a real infection in people.
NEWS
May 6, 2011 | By Trine Tsouderos, Chicago Tribune / For the Booster Shots blog
This post has been corrected. See note at bottom for details. The news this week was not good for those banking on a link between the retrovirus XMRV and chronic fatigue syndrome. A much-awaited study — arguably the most comprehensive search for evidence of XMRV in the blood of chronic fatigue syndrome patients to date — was published Wednesday in the Journal of Virology. That study, which examined the blood of 100 patients and 200 healthy peers, found no evidence of the retrovirus in anybody’s blood.
NEWS
October 25, 2010
A new study casts further doubt on the role of a retrovirus, XMRV, in human disease, adding weight to the possibility that earlier studies finding a link between the virus and cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome may have been wrong. In the study, researchers from the National Cancer Institute and Johns Hopkins Medicine report being unable to find any evidence of the retrovirus in nearly 800 prostate cancer samples. "It is possible that XMRV is not actually circulating in the human population," the team wrote in its paper published by the journal Cancer Research last week.
NEWS
September 9, 2010
Teenagers with chronic fatigue syndrome may push themselves too hard, which contributes to ongoing fatigue, claim the authors of a new study.   Researchers followed 301 adolescents with mononucleosis, which often precedes chronic fatigue syndrome in teens. They diagnosed 39 teens with chronic fatigue syndrome six months after the mononucleosis diagnosis. That group of adolescents was compared with 39 of the youths who had mononucleosis but who had recovered fully after six months.
SCIENCE
August 24, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Government scientists have found traces of a mouse-related virus in 86% of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, a discovery that is likely to reignite the controversy surrounding the virus widely known as XMRV. Nevada scientists first reported the presence of the virus in chronic fatigue patients in 2009, but at least three subsequent studies failed to detect it. On Monday, however, researchers from three different government agencies said they had found the virus in stored and fresh blood samples.
HEALTH
May 24, 2010 | By Diane Shipley, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome meant I was exhausted all the time. I felt like I had cotton candy where a brain should be. Embarrassingly for a former English major, I lost words, even simple ones. "You know, those things! They go on feet!" I'd cry, frustrated. "Shoes?" my mom would ask. "Socks?" I also lost my life as I knew it. One week I had a full college load, my nights spent clubbing or writing essays, surviving on caffeine and chocolate. The next, I became so exhausted pulling on pantyhose that I had to lie down for an hour.
SPORTS
April 17, 1998 | LON EUBANKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first, Erin Remy thought she had a bad cold. Then it kept getting worse. "I felt like I had the flu for months," Remy said. "I had trouble breathing, and then when it got really bad I thought it was my heart because I was having palpitations." For nearly two years her troubles continued. She was often dizzy, disoriented and couldn't sleep. "There were times when I'd get in the car and start to go somewhere, it was like I had Alzheimer's and couldn't remember where I was going," Remy said.
SCIENCE
October 9, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
In what may prove to be the first major breakthrough in the fight against the mysterious and controversial disorder known as chronic fatigue syndrome, researchers reported today that they have found traces of a virus in the vast majority of patients with the disease, commonly known as CFS. The same virus has previously been identified in at least a quarter of prostate tumors, particularly those that are very aggressive, and has also been linked...
Los Angeles Times Articles
|