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Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1989 | DAVID JACOBSON, THE HARTFORD COURANT
Years after it first grabbed headlines and became a popular talk-show subject, chronic fatigue syndrome continues to raise more questions than it answers. Is it a new, media-made illness or is it 100 years old? Is it common or rare? In the search for its underpinnings, is medical technology on a witch hunt or is science closing in on a complex crippler? Medical researchers at the University of Connecticut claim to have largely answered those questions and helped scores of CFS sufferers recover.
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NEWS
December 2, 1993 | DAVID HALDANE, David Haldane is a staff writer for The Times Orange County Edition. This column is one in an occasional series of first-person accounts of activities in and around Orange County.
The moment of truth came with the realization that there were six needles protruding from the top of my head. As the tingling receded, pulling me into a kind of dreamy lethargy, I began to reflect on the road that had brought me to this time and place wherein my scalp had become something of a human pin cushion. The truth is, vanity had never been one of my major vices. I have others, to be sure. I'm late to almost everything.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Keith Jarrett's remarkable musical odyssey returns to UCLA's Royce Hall on Thursday night. The gifted pianist--an artist whose appeal crosses all boundaries--is making a rare appearance, his schedule kept to a minimum of carefully chosen dates, their frequency limited by his continuing treatment for chronic fatigue syndrome. In fact, his last appearance in Los Angeles, in February 1999, was followed by a serious relapse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2001 | RICHARD WINTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Complaining of a headache and nausea, a Los Angeles Superior Court judge said he was too sick to testify Tuesday at a disciplinary hearing that could lead to his removal from the bench for years of excessive absenteeism. Three judges conducting the hearing in Riverside agreed to delay Judge Patrick Murphy's testimony until today. But Justice Art W.
SCIENCE
August 24, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Government scientists have found traces of a mouse-related virus in 86% of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, a discovery that is likely to reignite the controversy surrounding the virus widely known as XMRV. Nevada scientists first reported the presence of the virus in chronic fatigue patients in 2009, but at least three subsequent studies failed to detect it. On Monday, however, researchers from three different government agencies said they had found the virus in stored and fresh blood samples.
NEWS
April 18, 1989 | JOAN LIBMAN
Dr. Jay Goldstein of Anaheim Hills has spent the last five years researching and treating patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, a debilitating disease characterized by incapacitating exhaustion and a range of other perplexing symptoms. Explaining his theory of an unknown retrovirus invading the immune system, inducing cells to produce a chemical transmitter affecting the entire body, Goldstein pauses. "You know," the family practitioner says, "some very respected physicians will tell you I am crazy."
NEWS
August 20, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
A woman who committed suicide last week with Jack Kevorkian's help was overweight and depressed but showed no signs of chronic fatigue syndrome, the coroner said. The finding by a longtime critic of Kevorkian's assisted-suicide campaign was questioned by other experts who said chronic fatigue syndrome leaves no sign in the body of its victim.
NEWS
August 17, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Dr. Jack Kevorkian said he might not have helped a woman commit suicide had he known her husband had been charged with assaulting her three weeks earlier, The Oakland Press reported. Judith Curren's husband, Dr. Franklin Curren, said his wife called police to their Massachusetts home about three weeks ago when they got into a fight over her desire to see Kevorkian.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2010 | By Jane Ciabattari, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Unbroken A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption Laura Hillenbrand Random House: 480 pp., $27 As I read Laura Hillenbrand's stirring and triumphant account of the harrowing experiences of American Olympic runner and World War II POW Louis Zamperini, I thought of the double load that the research and writing of "Unbroken" had put on its author. Hillenbrand is herself a steely example of triumph over more than 23 years of debilitating illness.
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