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Chronic Pain

NEWS
October 17, 1991 | MICHAEL SZYMANSKI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Szymanski is a frequent contributor to Valley View
Apain in the back has plagued Dolores Kurzhals of Van Nuys for seven years. She can't sit for more than 20 minutes at a time and she had to give up her job as a secretary at an engineering firm after two disk surgeries. She is now on disability and gets depressed about not being as active as she once was. So when she heard about an experiment that studies people with chronic pain and depression, she offered to help.
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NEWS
May 22, 1986 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
The treatment of hospital patients for acute temporary pain and chronic pain from terminal illness is often "inadequate and insufficient" because of misplaced concern about possible addiction or side effects, while outpatients suffering from other kinds of chronic pain are often overmedicated to the point of addiction, a federal advisory panel concluded Wednesday.
NEWS
November 15, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Seeing the movements of a healthy hand mirroring one's own movements plays a welcome trick on the brains of arthritis sufferers, a new study shows: It reduces the perception of pain. The observation, reported this week at the Society for Neuroscience's annual conference , could offer a safe, inexpensive means of dampening chronic pain by enlisting the brain's power of suggestion. The small  arthritis study, which tested just eight subjects, comes from the lab of UC San Diego neuroscientist V.S. Ramachandran -- who first used mirror-based trickery to treat phantom-limb pain in patients who have had an amputation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1994 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine a sharp, endless toothache, and you still have no idea how much chronic pain hurts. But no one gripes or grimaces at this meeting of the American Chronic Pain Assn. Spinal braces, foam cushions and canes carried into the meeting room at St. Jude's Catholic Church in Westlake are the only visible clues that the 17 members here are suffering. On the first and third Tuesdays of each month, they gather to talk of lives and careers shattered by nonstop pain.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2000 | Dow Jones
I-Flow Corp., a Lake Forest maker of low-cost nerve block infusion kits, said Tuesday it has acquired a San Antonio company for $1.5 million in cash and stock. The company said in a news release that the purchase price for privately held Spinal Specialties Inc. consisted of $750,000 of cash and 200,000 shares of common stock. I-Flow said the acquisition should boost earnings this year. Spinal Specialties, which makes custom, disposable products for chronic pain management, had $1.
OPINION
March 24, 2013
Re "Grocer may bid U.S. 'cheerio,'" March 21 The Times' evident bias against Fresh & Easy Neighborhood Market is intriguing. Why in a story about Fresh & Easy do we hear only from the chain's naysayers - including the founder of Trader Joe's, a pro-Trader Joe's analyst and a pro-Trader Joe's customer? Where are the interviews with Fresh & Easy customers? The article ends by quoting one person who says, "I don't know anybody that goes to Fresh & Easy. " Here's a clue: Go to a store and you'll find us. I am one customer who will be disappointed if Fresh & Easy closes, as I've found products that often exceed my expectations.
HEALTH
December 22, 1997
It's a doctor's visit with a difference at the UCLA Center for East-West Medicine, where traditional Western medicine and Eastern techniques, such as massage and acupuncture, come together. Above, Dr. Jun Liang Yu, with Dr. Ka Kit Hui, massages a patient who has symptoms of chronic fatigue. Yu--who is both physician and massage therapist--says the method is not designed simply to soothe and relax but to treat ailments such as chronic pain by applying pressure to specific points.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1993 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Traditionally, patients have anticipated hospitalization as a painful experience. But many hospitals in Orange County are striving to change that. Not only are they adopting new technology for relief of surgical pain, but they are setting up clinics where people can go to soothe their chronic aches. Within the past decade, more hospitals have begun to catch up with the latest pain management equipment and practices.
NEWS
July 7, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
A sunburn’s hot and aching soreness is difficult to ease, even after slathering on aloe vera, and especially when tossing and turning at night. Now researchers say they’ve found a protein responsible for this inflammatory pain. Targeting this molecule could eventually lead to new ways to relieve not only soreness from too much time at the beach but also other types of chronic pain. To reach their conclusion, researchers burned tiny patches of skin on human volunteers with UVB light (the type of radiation classically associated with skin cancer)
HEALTH
October 29, 2007 | Andrea R. Vaucher, Special to The Times
The 30 or so clinicians and researchers sat cross-legged on cushions or in chairs, their eyes closed, as their teacher led them through a guided meditation. Telling them to relax their bodies and concentrate on their breathing, author and meditation instructor Sharon Salzberg urged them to overcome distractions such as sounds, thoughts and emotions by coming back to the breath each time they found their minds wandering. The goal, she said, was to still the mind.
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