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Chronic Pain

HEALTH
July 5, 2010 | By Karen Ravn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Pain. It stabs. It burns. It aches. It throbs. It gnaws at you. It knocks you for a loop. But, sooner or later, it goes away. Unless it doesn't. That's a nightmare come true for millions of Americans who spend every day in a world of hurt. And the problem will get only bigger. "As our demographics change, and we live longer, more people will experience chronic pain," says Dr. Lynn Webster, medical director of the Lifetree Clinical Research and Pain Clinic in Salt Lake City.
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HEALTH
March 22, 1999 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
When Patricia Whiteside began suffering crippling migraine pain in her 20s, she embarked on what would be a tortured journey to find relief at the offices of orthopedic surgeons, chiropractors and local pain clinics. At age 62, she is still searching. Pain patients like Whiteside often spend years shuffling among doctors and other health care providers, trying an assortment of treatments in a frustrating search for an end to their misery.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | MICHAEL SZYMANSKI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Szymanski is a frequent contributor to Valley View
Apain in the back has plagued Dolores Kurzhals of Van Nuys for seven years. She can't sit for more than 20 minutes at a time and she had to give up her job as a secretary at an engineering firm after two disk surgeries. She is now on disability and gets depressed about not being as active as she once was. So when she heard about an experiment that studies people with chronic pain and depression, she offered to help.
NEWS
May 22, 1986 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
The treatment of hospital patients for acute temporary pain and chronic pain from terminal illness is often "inadequate and insufficient" because of misplaced concern about possible addiction or side effects, while outpatients suffering from other kinds of chronic pain are often overmedicated to the point of addiction, a federal advisory panel concluded Wednesday.
NEWS
September 5, 2012 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Scientists in Norway have more good news for coffee drinkers. Researchers have already found evidence that the drink -- or the beans it's brewed from -- can help with weight loss , reduce one's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease or dementia, boost muscle growth , protect against certain types of cancers, and can even reduce one's risk of premature death , among many other benefits . Now comes word that a cuppa joe reduces physical...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1994 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine a sharp, endless toothache, and you still have no idea how much chronic pain hurts. But no one gripes or grimaces at this meeting of the American Chronic Pain Assn. Spinal braces, foam cushions and canes carried into the meeting room at St. Jude's Catholic Church in Westlake are the only visible clues that the 17 members here are suffering. On the first and third Tuesdays of each month, they gather to talk of lives and careers shattered by nonstop pain.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2000 | Dow Jones
I-Flow Corp., a Lake Forest maker of low-cost nerve block infusion kits, said Tuesday it has acquired a San Antonio company for $1.5 million in cash and stock. The company said in a news release that the purchase price for privately held Spinal Specialties Inc. consisted of $750,000 of cash and 200,000 shares of common stock. I-Flow said the acquisition should boost earnings this year. Spinal Specialties, which makes custom, disposable products for chronic pain management, had $1.
OPINION
March 24, 2013
Re "Grocer may bid U.S. 'cheerio,'" March 21 The Times' evident bias against Fresh & Easy Neighborhood Market is intriguing. Why in a story about Fresh & Easy do we hear only from the chain's naysayers - including the founder of Trader Joe's, a pro-Trader Joe's analyst and a pro-Trader Joe's customer? Where are the interviews with Fresh & Easy customers? The article ends by quoting one person who says, "I don't know anybody that goes to Fresh & Easy. " Here's a clue: Go to a store and you'll find us. I am one customer who will be disappointed if Fresh & Easy closes, as I've found products that often exceed my expectations.
HEALTH
December 22, 1997
It's a doctor's visit with a difference at the UCLA Center for East-West Medicine, where traditional Western medicine and Eastern techniques, such as massage and acupuncture, come together. Above, Dr. Jun Liang Yu, with Dr. Ka Kit Hui, massages a patient who has symptoms of chronic fatigue. Yu--who is both physician and massage therapist--says the method is not designed simply to soothe and relax but to treat ailments such as chronic pain by applying pressure to specific points.
NATIONAL
November 25, 2005 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
Dory Bauler prides herself on staying active despite painful back problems. But at one point this year, she was getting so short of breath that she could barely walk. Doctors could find nothing wrong. It never occurred to them that the medicinal skin patch she was using to deliver pain relief might also be poisoning her. "I was just shutting down," said Bauler, 76, a retired paralegal from Laguna Woods in Orange County, who suffers from a severe curvature of the spine.
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