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Chronic Pain

NEWS
October 17, 1991 | MICHAEL SZYMANSKI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Szymanski is a frequent contributor to Valley View
Apain in the back has plagued Dolores Kurzhals of Van Nuys for seven years. She can't sit for more than 20 minutes at a time and she had to give up her job as a secretary at an engineering firm after two disk surgeries. She is now on disability and gets depressed about not being as active as she once was. So when she heard about an experiment that studies people with chronic pain and depression, she offered to help.
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MAGAZINE
October 4, 1987 | MARY MURPHY SWERTLOW, Mary Murphy Swertlow is a Los Angeles writer for TV Guide
NICK, give mommy a hug," said my husband, Frank. "Nick, give mommy a hug." My son, Nick, was being a temperamental 8-year-old. He sat at the edge of our bed pouting. When he heard his father's request, he stood up on the bed and began to walk gingerly toward me, picking his way across our legs. He lost his balance, fell forward and threw himself on top of me, wrapping his arms around my body in a loving hug. Suddenly, I couldn't move. The fall caught me lying in the wrong position.
NEWS
May 22, 1986 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
The treatment of hospital patients for acute temporary pain and chronic pain from terminal illness is often "inadequate and insufficient" because of misplaced concern about possible addiction or side effects, while outpatients suffering from other kinds of chronic pain are often overmedicated to the point of addiction, a federal advisory panel concluded Wednesday.
NATIONAL
November 4, 2002 | Robert Lee Hotz, Times Staff Writer
Scientists have proved what so many have long suspected: The very presence of your solicitous spouse can be a pain. By eavesdropping on electrical activity in the most private precincts of the mind, researchers investigating the effects of chronic pain discovered that a husband or wife can make the ache feel three times worse simply by being in the room. All they had to do to make their spouses feel better, the neural probes revealed, was leave.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1994 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine a sharp, endless toothache, and you still have no idea how much chronic pain hurts. But no one gripes or grimaces at this meeting of the American Chronic Pain Assn. Spinal braces, foam cushions and canes carried into the meeting room at St. Jude's Catholic Church in Westlake are the only visible clues that the 17 members here are suffering. On the first and third Tuesdays of each month, they gather to talk of lives and careers shattered by nonstop pain.
HEALTH
December 22, 1997
It's a doctor's visit with a difference at the UCLA Center for East-West Medicine, where traditional Western medicine and Eastern techniques, such as massage and acupuncture, come together. Above, Dr. Jun Liang Yu, with Dr. Ka Kit Hui, massages a patient who has symptoms of chronic fatigue. Yu--who is both physician and massage therapist--says the method is not designed simply to soothe and relax but to treat ailments such as chronic pain by applying pressure to specific points.
OPINION
March 24, 2013
Re "Grocer may bid U.S. 'cheerio,'" March 21 The Times' evident bias against Fresh & Easy Neighborhood Market is intriguing. Why in a story about Fresh & Easy do we hear only from the chain's naysayers - including the founder of Trader Joe's, a pro-Trader Joe's analyst and a pro-Trader Joe's customer? Where are the interviews with Fresh & Easy customers? The article ends by quoting one person who says, "I don't know anybody that goes to Fresh & Easy. " Here's a clue: Go to a store and you'll find us. I am one customer who will be disappointed if Fresh & Easy closes, as I've found products that often exceed my expectations.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2000 | Dow Jones
I-Flow Corp., a Lake Forest maker of low-cost nerve block infusion kits, said Tuesday it has acquired a San Antonio company for $1.5 million in cash and stock. The company said in a news release that the purchase price for privately held Spinal Specialties Inc. consisted of $750,000 of cash and 200,000 shares of common stock. I-Flow said the acquisition should boost earnings this year. Spinal Specialties, which makes custom, disposable products for chronic pain management, had $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2012 | By Hailey Branson-Potts, Los Angeles Times
A Northridge doctor's license was suspended Thursday after medical authorities found that he had been injecting his daughter at home with propofol, the same drug that killed pop star Michael Jackson. Robert S. Markman, a retired anesthesiologist, constructed a treatment area in his adult daughter's "filthy" house, in a bedroom she rarely left, the Medical Board of California alleged in a ruling on an interim suspension order made public Thursday. Markman, according to the board's order, injected his daughter, referred to only as L.M., with the surgical anesthetic about 500 times over five years.
NEWS
May 7, 1985 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
It may seem like an unlikely scenario: You're suffering from temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJ), the painful jaw disorder, and while you're stretched out in the dental chair your dentist starts asking if you've had any changes in appetite or energy level. Have you been feeling tense and irritable? Do you feel a sense of hopelessness? You answer in the affirmative and your dentist, recognizing signs of depression, refers you to a psychologist.
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