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Chronic Pain

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1993 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Traditionally, patients have anticipated hospitalization as a painful experience. But many hospitals in Orange County are striving to change that. Not only are they adopting new technology for relief of surgical pain, but they are setting up clinics where people can go to soothe their chronic aches. Within the past decade, more hospitals have begun to catch up with the latest pain management equipment and practices.
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NEWS
March 30, 1995 | LEONARD REED, Leonard Reed is a Times staff writer
The woman has back pain. Not the transient twinge, not the usual Monday-after-a-Sunday-of-gardening back pain. The pain just lives in her and increases through the day, so that by the end of the day she is unable to cook dinner for her family. It's been this way, every day, for more than a year. Her doctor prescribed medication. It didn't work. After a year of trying to break through the pain with drugs, the doctor looked at her and said, "Well, I guess that's it." "What's 'it'?"
NEWS
April 4, 1996 | Associated Press
The popular new prescription pain reliever Ultram can cause addiction or seizures in certain patients and must be used with caution, the Food and Drug Administration warned doctors Wednesday. Known chemically as tramadol, the drug was approved just a year ago but already has been used by 5 million patients suffering chronic pain, anything from back problems to broken bones.
HEALTH
August 28, 2006 | Susan Brink, Times Staff Writer
MINT is great for sweet kisses or for covering up that lunchtime martini, but, as herbalists have long known, the menthol within its oils also soothes and cools the skin. Now scientists have discovered the basis for that property, known scientifically as cool-induced analgesia, and are working on new therapies for alleviating pain.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1998
I am a 78-year-old World War II veteran, now disabled, who wears two magnets daily ["Attracting Controversy," Personal Finance, June 14]. Without these magnets, I could not walk every morning at daybreak for one hour. Without these magnets, I could not play golf one, two and sometimes three times a week. Yes, magnets work on some people, and on some they do not. HOWARD D. WRIGHT Canoga Park I thought the story on magnetic therapy was very impressive. I had back surgery years ago and have had chronic pain since.
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
People with fibromyalgia suffer from chronic pain throughout the body, especially in their joints, muscles and tendons. But research shows that exercise can make patients feel better and improve their quality of life. Dr. Ginevra Liptan, an authority on the disorder at the Oregon Health Sciences Center, has conducted research on how a type of massage therapy of the fascia tissue -- the connective tissue surrounding muscles -- can help relieve discomfort. To find out more about the therapy and how exercise and fibromyalgia are linked, join a live Web chat Monday at 11 a.m. PDT (1 p.m. CDT, 2 p.m. EDT)
HEALTH
December 29, 1997 | ROCHELLE O'GORMAN FLYNN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Adderly deserves credit for improving her ability to read aloud. She still over-enunciates, but not to the annoying degree she did while reading "The Fat Blocker Diet" (Harper Audio, 1997), which she also co-wrote. Her pacing has improved and she sounds far more natural. That said, buy the book. This audio outlines a seemingly sound combination of diet, exercise and supplements aimed at eliminating or greatly reducing osteoarthritis.
NATIONAL
November 25, 2005 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
Dory Bauler prides herself on staying active despite painful back problems. But at one point this year, she was getting so short of breath that she could barely walk. Doctors could find nothing wrong. It never occurred to them that the medicinal skin patch she was using to deliver pain relief might also be poisoning her. "I was just shutting down," said Bauler, 76, a retired paralegal from Laguna Woods in Orange County, who suffers from a severe curvature of the spine.
OPINION
November 17, 2002
Oh, good, another unexpected wrinkle from scientific observations of our society's most fundamental optional relationship: marriage. Some German scientists -- weren't they the ones who gifted us with the rocket? -- have figured out that spouses being solicitous of a partner in chronic pain actually increase the suffering. By expressing concern and talking about the problem, the "helper" can triple the pain. They have the proof right there in little electric brain squiggles.
NEWS
October 20, 1985
The patient wasn't given any drug, but he showed no sign of discomfort as his dentist cleaned out a large cavity and filled the tooth. With a mere twist of a knob on a little black box, Richard Kindy controlled the output of an electrical device that stimulated his nerves and blocked his perception of pain. The makers of the device expect that it will replace injections of drugs to block pain in many dental patients, once it gains federal approval. All Kindy felt as Dr.
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