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Chronic Pain

NEWS
May 7, 1985 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
It may seem like an unlikely scenario: You're suffering from temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJ), the painful jaw disorder, and while you're stretched out in the dental chair your dentist starts asking if you've had any changes in appetite or energy level. Have you been feeling tense and irritable? Do you feel a sense of hopelessness? You answer in the affirmative and your dentist, recognizing signs of depression, refers you to a psychologist.
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NEWS
September 5, 2012 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Scientists in Norway have more good news for coffee drinkers. Researchers have already found evidence that the drink -- or the beans it's brewed from -- can help with weight loss , reduce one's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease or dementia, boost muscle growth , protect against certain types of cancers, and can even reduce one's risk of premature death , among many other benefits . Now comes word that a cuppa joe reduces physical...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1993 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Traditionally, patients have anticipated hospitalization as a painful experience. But many hospitals in Orange County are striving to change that. Not only are they adopting new technology for relief of surgical pain, but they are setting up clinics where people can go to soothe their chronic aches. Within the past decade, more hospitals have begun to catch up with the latest pain management equipment and practices.
NEWS
March 30, 1995 | LEONARD REED, Leonard Reed is a Times staff writer
The woman has back pain. Not the transient twinge, not the usual Monday-after-a-Sunday-of-gardening back pain. The pain just lives in her and increases through the day, so that by the end of the day she is unable to cook dinner for her family. It's been this way, every day, for more than a year. Her doctor prescribed medication. It didn't work. After a year of trying to break through the pain with drugs, the doctor looked at her and said, "Well, I guess that's it." "What's 'it'?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2012 | By Hailey Branson-Potts, Los Angeles Times
A Northridge doctor's license was suspended Thursday after medical authorities found that he had been injecting his daughter at home with propofol, the same drug that killed pop star Michael Jackson. Robert S. Markman, a retired anesthesiologist, constructed a treatment area in his adult daughter's "filthy" house, in a bedroom she rarely left, the Medical Board of California alleged in a ruling on an interim suspension order made public Thursday. Markman, according to the board's order, injected his daughter, referred to only as L.M., with the surgical anesthetic about 500 times over five years.
OPINION
January 29, 2013
Re "Panel urges more control of Vicodin," Jan. 26 Reclassifying hydrocodone as a Schedule II narcotic may be of some value in controlling the number of Vicodin prescriptions given out, but this would be of minor benefit. In my experience, most Vicodin prescriptions are for small doses and are written after minor medical procedures or injuries. The real problem is the deaths caused by the few physicians who don't actually practice medicine but merely prescribe drugs to anyone who asks for them.
NEWS
July 7, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
A sunburn’s hot and aching soreness is difficult to ease, even after slathering on aloe vera, and especially when tossing and turning at night. Now researchers say they’ve found a protein responsible for this inflammatory pain. Targeting this molecule could eventually lead to new ways to relieve not only soreness from too much time at the beach but also other types of chronic pain. To reach their conclusion, researchers burned tiny patches of skin on human volunteers with UVB light (the type of radiation classically associated with skin cancer)
NEWS
September 4, 2012 | Martha Groves
A 19-year-old North Hollywood High School student who broke his neck during a football tryout practice has won a $2.4-million arbitration award against the Los Angeles Unified School District. Johnny Rider suffered a five-way cervical spine fracture during a running back drill on July 8, 2008, for which he and other students were not provided helmets or other protective gear. LAUSD admitted liability for failing to provide protective equipment and acknowledged the football tryout was "unauthorized and unsupervised," according to a statement from Browne Greene, Rider's attorney.
NEWS
April 4, 1996 | Associated Press
The popular new prescription pain reliever Ultram can cause addiction or seizures in certain patients and must be used with caution, the Food and Drug Administration warned doctors Wednesday. Known chemically as tramadol, the drug was approved just a year ago but already has been used by 5 million patients suffering chronic pain, anything from back problems to broken bones.
HEALTH
August 28, 2006 | Susan Brink, Times Staff Writer
MINT is great for sweet kisses or for covering up that lunchtime martini, but, as herbalists have long known, the menthol within its oils also soothes and cools the skin. Now scientists have discovered the basis for that property, known scientifically as cool-induced analgesia, and are working on new therapies for alleviating pain.
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