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Chronic Pain

HEALTH
December 22, 1997
It's a doctor's visit with a difference at the UCLA Center for East-West Medicine, where traditional Western medicine and Eastern techniques, such as massage and acupuncture, come together. Above, Dr. Jun Liang Yu, with Dr. Ka Kit Hui, massages a patient who has symptoms of chronic fatigue. Yu--who is both physician and massage therapist--says the method is not designed simply to soothe and relax but to treat ailments such as chronic pain by applying pressure to specific points.
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NEWS
May 7, 1985 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
It may seem like an unlikely scenario: You're suffering from temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJ), the painful jaw disorder, and while you're stretched out in the dental chair your dentist starts asking if you've had any changes in appetite or energy level. Have you been feeling tense and irritable? Do you feel a sense of hopelessness? You answer in the affirmative and your dentist, recognizing signs of depression, refers you to a psychologist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1993 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Traditionally, patients have anticipated hospitalization as a painful experience. But many hospitals in Orange County are striving to change that. Not only are they adopting new technology for relief of surgical pain, but they are setting up clinics where people can go to soothe their chronic aches. Within the past decade, more hospitals have begun to catch up with the latest pain management equipment and practices.
HEALTH
April 6, 2011 | Michelle Andrews, Kaiser Health News
Chronic pain -- the kind that lasts for months or recurs regularly – afflicts more than a quarter of adult Americans. Treating pain can be extremely challenging, however, in part because it can't be measured with instruments. It's in the eye -- or neck or joint -- of the beholder. Doctors often prescribe powerful painkillers called opioids -- natural or synthetic versions of opium. Sometimes the prescription is for short-term, acute pain: If you've ever had a root canal or surgery or thrown out your back, you may have received a prescription for Percocet or Vicodin, both of which are opioids that also contain acetaminophen.
NATIONAL
November 4, 2002 | Robert Lee Hotz, Times Staff Writer
Scientists have proved what so many have long suspected: The very presence of your solicitous spouse can be a pain. By eavesdropping on electrical activity in the most private precincts of the mind, researchers investigating the effects of chronic pain discovered that a husband or wife can make the ache feel three times worse simply by being in the room. All they had to do to make their spouses feel better, the neural probes revealed, was leave.
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
People with fibromyalgia suffer from chronic pain throughout the body, especially in their joints, muscles and tendons. But research shows that exercise can make patients feel better and improve their quality of life. Dr. Ginevra Liptan, an authority on the disorder at the Oregon Health Sciences Center, has conducted research on how a type of massage therapy of the fascia tissue -- the connective tissue surrounding muscles -- can help relieve discomfort. To find out more about the therapy and how exercise and fibromyalgia are linked, join a live Web chat Monday at 11 a.m. PDT (1 p.m. CDT, 2 p.m. EDT)
HEALTH
December 29, 1997 | ROCHELLE O'GORMAN FLYNN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Adderly deserves credit for improving her ability to read aloud. She still over-enunciates, but not to the annoying degree she did while reading "The Fat Blocker Diet" (Harper Audio, 1997), which she also co-wrote. Her pacing has improved and she sounds far more natural. That said, buy the book. This audio outlines a seemingly sound combination of diet, exercise and supplements aimed at eliminating or greatly reducing osteoarthritis.
NEWS
March 30, 1995 | LEONARD REED, Leonard Reed is a Times staff writer
The woman has back pain. Not the transient twinge, not the usual Monday-after-a-Sunday-of-gardening back pain. The pain just lives in her and increases through the day, so that by the end of the day she is unable to cook dinner for her family. It's been this way, every day, for more than a year. Her doctor prescribed medication. It didn't work. After a year of trying to break through the pain with drugs, the doctor looked at her and said, "Well, I guess that's it." "What's 'it'?"
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Tigran Mansurian, Armenia's most celebrated composer, will turn 75 this month and the  Dilijan Chamber Music series will celebrate Sunday afternoon at the Zipper Concert Hall of the Colburn School with a survey of the Mansurian's chamber music over the past half century. It will be, no doubt, a joyous occasion, what with the composer present and Dilijan, which is devoted to Armenian music, being among Mansurian's  most important of champions in America.   That is joyous , not joyful, and of the deep-down variety.
NEWS
November 15, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Seeing the movements of a healthy hand mirroring one's own movements plays a welcome trick on the brains of arthritis sufferers, a new study shows: It reduces the perception of pain. The observation, reported this week at the Society for Neuroscience's annual conference , could offer a safe, inexpensive means of dampening chronic pain by enlisting the brain's power of suggestion. The small  arthritis study, which tested just eight subjects, comes from the lab of UC San Diego neuroscientist V.S. Ramachandran -- who first used mirror-based trickery to treat phantom-limb pain in patients who have had an amputation.
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