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Chronic Pain

NEWS
March 30, 1995 | LEONARD REED, Leonard Reed is a Times staff writer
The woman has back pain. Not the transient twinge, not the usual Monday-after-a-Sunday-of-gardening back pain. The pain just lives in her and increases through the day, so that by the end of the day she is unable to cook dinner for her family. It's been this way, every day, for more than a year. Her doctor prescribed medication. It didn't work. After a year of trying to break through the pain with drugs, the doctor looked at her and said, "Well, I guess that's it." "What's 'it'?"
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NEWS
February 2, 2002 | ROB FERNAS and DAN ARRITT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Bill Stanfill, who played defensive end, can't turn his head more than a few inches because of fused vertebrae in his neck. When he puts his car in reverse, he says, "I ease back until I bump into something." Teammate Manny Fernandez, a defensive tackle, has given up tennis, handball, golf and running because of chronic pain in his knees. "I can walk," he says. "That's about it."
NEWS
May 7, 1985 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
It may seem like an unlikely scenario: You're suffering from temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJ), the painful jaw disorder, and while you're stretched out in the dental chair your dentist starts asking if you've had any changes in appetite or energy level. Have you been feeling tense and irritable? Do you feel a sense of hopelessness? You answer in the affirmative and your dentist, recognizing signs of depression, refers you to a psychologist.
NEWS
July 7, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
A sunburn’s hot and aching soreness is difficult to ease, even after slathering on aloe vera, and especially when tossing and turning at night. Now researchers say they’ve found a protein responsible for this inflammatory pain. Targeting this molecule could eventually lead to new ways to relieve not only soreness from too much time at the beach but also other types of chronic pain. To reach their conclusion, researchers burned tiny patches of skin on human volunteers with UVB light (the type of radiation classically associated with skin cancer)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2013 | By Nardine Saad
Lady Gaga needs surgery after suffering from a concert injury, which has led to the cancellation of her "Born This Way Ball" tour. The singer, whose real name is Stefani Germanotta, was experiencing chronic pain that caused the cancellation of four tour shows earlier this week. "After additional tests this morning to review the severity of the issue, it has been determined that Lady Gaga has a labral tear of the right hip,"  a Live Nation post on LittleMonsters .com announced Wednesday.
NEWS
April 4, 1996 | Associated Press
The popular new prescription pain reliever Ultram can cause addiction or seizures in certain patients and must be used with caution, the Food and Drug Administration warned doctors Wednesday. Known chemically as tramadol, the drug was approved just a year ago but already has been used by 5 million patients suffering chronic pain, anything from back problems to broken bones.
HEALTH
August 28, 2006 | Susan Brink, Times Staff Writer
MINT is great for sweet kisses or for covering up that lunchtime martini, but, as herbalists have long known, the menthol within its oils also soothes and cools the skin. Now scientists have discovered the basis for that property, known scientifically as cool-induced analgesia, and are working on new therapies for alleviating pain.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1998
I am a 78-year-old World War II veteran, now disabled, who wears two magnets daily ["Attracting Controversy," Personal Finance, June 14]. Without these magnets, I could not walk every morning at daybreak for one hour. Without these magnets, I could not play golf one, two and sometimes three times a week. Yes, magnets work on some people, and on some they do not. HOWARD D. WRIGHT Canoga Park I thought the story on magnetic therapy was very impressive. I had back surgery years ago and have had chronic pain since.
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
People with fibromyalgia suffer from chronic pain throughout the body, especially in their joints, muscles and tendons. But research shows that exercise can make patients feel better and improve their quality of life. Dr. Ginevra Liptan, an authority on the disorder at the Oregon Health Sciences Center, has conducted research on how a type of massage therapy of the fascia tissue -- the connective tissue surrounding muscles -- can help relieve discomfort. To find out more about the therapy and how exercise and fibromyalgia are linked, join a live Web chat Monday at 11 a.m. PDT (1 p.m. CDT, 2 p.m. EDT)
HEALTH
December 29, 1997 | ROCHELLE O'GORMAN FLYNN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Adderly deserves credit for improving her ability to read aloud. She still over-enunciates, but not to the annoying degree she did while reading "The Fat Blocker Diet" (Harper Audio, 1997), which she also co-wrote. Her pacing has improved and she sounds far more natural. That said, buy the book. This audio outlines a seemingly sound combination of diet, exercise and supplements aimed at eliminating or greatly reducing osteoarthritis.
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