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Chronic Pain

NEWS
July 7, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
A sunburn’s hot and aching soreness is difficult to ease, even after slathering on aloe vera, and especially when tossing and turning at night. Now researchers say they’ve found a protein responsible for this inflammatory pain. Targeting this molecule could eventually lead to new ways to relieve not only soreness from too much time at the beach but also other types of chronic pain. To reach their conclusion, researchers burned tiny patches of skin on human volunteers with UVB light (the type of radiation classically associated with skin cancer)
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NEWS
September 5, 2012 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Scientists in Norway have more good news for coffee drinkers. Researchers have already found evidence that the drink -- or the beans it's brewed from -- can help with weight loss , reduce one's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease or dementia, boost muscle growth , protect against certain types of cancers, and can even reduce one's risk of premature death , among many other benefits . Now comes word that a cuppa joe reduces physical...
HEALTH
January 14, 2002
PAIN FREE FOR WOMEN: The Revolutionary Program for Ending Chronic Pain By Pete Egoscue with Roger Gittines Bantam Books 446 pages, $24.95 Perhaps I was in the right frame of mind when I picked up this book--I had just joined a gym and, after a flare-up of tendinitis, was paying close attention to my posture, alignment and use of my joints and muscles. So I was ready to listen to Pete Egoscue's message.
HEALTH
March 22, 1999 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
When Patricia Whiteside began suffering crippling migraine pain in her 20s, she embarked on what would be a tortured journey to find relief at the offices of orthopedic surgeons, chiropractors and local pain clinics. At age 62, she is still searching. Pain patients like Whiteside often spend years shuffling among doctors and other health care providers, trying an assortment of treatments in a frustrating search for an end to their misery.
NEWS
April 4, 1996 | Associated Press
The popular new prescription pain reliever Ultram can cause addiction or seizures in certain patients and must be used with caution, the Food and Drug Administration warned doctors Wednesday. Known chemically as tramadol, the drug was approved just a year ago but already has been used by 5 million patients suffering chronic pain, anything from back problems to broken bones.
HEALTH
August 28, 2006 | Susan Brink, Times Staff Writer
MINT is great for sweet kisses or for covering up that lunchtime martini, but, as herbalists have long known, the menthol within its oils also soothes and cools the skin. Now scientists have discovered the basis for that property, known scientifically as cool-induced analgesia, and are working on new therapies for alleviating pain.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1998
I am a 78-year-old World War II veteran, now disabled, who wears two magnets daily ["Attracting Controversy," Personal Finance, June 14]. Without these magnets, I could not walk every morning at daybreak for one hour. Without these magnets, I could not play golf one, two and sometimes three times a week. Yes, magnets work on some people, and on some they do not. HOWARD D. WRIGHT Canoga Park I thought the story on magnetic therapy was very impressive. I had back surgery years ago and have had chronic pain since.
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
People with fibromyalgia suffer from chronic pain throughout the body, especially in their joints, muscles and tendons. But research shows that exercise can make patients feel better and improve their quality of life. Dr. Ginevra Liptan, an authority on the disorder at the Oregon Health Sciences Center, has conducted research on how a type of massage therapy of the fascia tissue -- the connective tissue surrounding muscles -- can help relieve discomfort. To find out more about the therapy and how exercise and fibromyalgia are linked, join a live Web chat Monday at 11 a.m. PDT (1 p.m. CDT, 2 p.m. EDT)
HEALTH
December 29, 1997 | ROCHELLE O'GORMAN FLYNN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Adderly deserves credit for improving her ability to read aloud. She still over-enunciates, but not to the annoying degree she did while reading "The Fat Blocker Diet" (Harper Audio, 1997), which she also co-wrote. Her pacing has improved and she sounds far more natural. That said, buy the book. This audio outlines a seemingly sound combination of diet, exercise and supplements aimed at eliminating or greatly reducing osteoarthritis.
OPINION
November 17, 2002
Oh, good, another unexpected wrinkle from scientific observations of our society's most fundamental optional relationship: marriage. Some German scientists -- weren't they the ones who gifted us with the rocket? -- have figured out that spouses being solicitous of a partner in chronic pain actually increase the suffering. By expressing concern and talking about the problem, the "helper" can triple the pain. They have the proof right there in little electric brain squiggles.
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