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Chuck Jones

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2013
Celebrate the 100th birthday of Chuck Jones, one of the most beloved directors of animated shorts. This Cinefamily tribute screens 35mm prints of Jones' best cartoons, including films from his personal collection featuring Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck and Elmer Fudd. In addition, animation historian Jerry Beck will lead a panel discussion, and the night will end with a rare showing of Jones' 1973 television special "A Cricket in Times Square. " Cinefamily at the Silent Movie Theater, 611 N. Fairfax Ave., L.A. 4 p.m. Sat. $12. (323)
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2013 | By Susan King
Linda Jones considered herself "incredibly lucky" to have had a father like Chuck Jones, the Oscar-winning animation director of Warner Bros. Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies fame. "He was probably the best father anybody could have," said Linda Jones, an only child. "His father had a difficult time being a father, and he vowed he would never impose that kind of difficulty and challenge on a child. " Her dad, she said, "was pretty much a 9 to 5 guy. He didn't bring his work home with him. " PHOTOS: Behind-the-scenes Classic Hollywood That is until after he would finish one of the riotously funny 300 films he directed in his 60-plus year career starring such animated superstars as Bugs Bunny, Porky Pig, Daffy Duck, Pepe Le Pew, Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2012 | By Susan King
It's a Chuck Jones-a-thon weekend at the Alex Theatre and the American Cinematheque's Aero Theatre. The Chuck Jones Centennial Celebration Film Festival on Friday evening at the Alex Theatre in Glendale pays tribute to the late Oscar-winning animator-director who brought such Looney Tunes' characters to life as Wile E. Coyote, Road Runner and  Pepe Le Pew. Among the Jones cartoons being screened include “Rabbit Seasoning?,” “Robin Hood Daffy” and “Feed the Kitty.” Several animators and members of the Jones family will be participating as well as Carl Bell, who worked with Jones in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and animator-director Eric Goldberg, who directed “Pocahontas.” alextheatre/org.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2013
Celebrate the 100th birthday of Chuck Jones, one of the most beloved directors of animated shorts. This Cinefamily tribute screens 35mm prints of Jones' best cartoons, including films from his personal collection featuring Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck and Elmer Fudd. In addition, animation historian Jerry Beck will lead a panel discussion, and the night will end with a rare showing of Jones' 1973 television special "A Cricket in Times Square. " Cinefamily at the Silent Movie Theater, 611 N. Fairfax Ave., L.A. 4 p.m. Sat. $12. (323)
NEWS
April 25, 2001 | Ann Conway
Back surgery kept four-time Academy Award-winning animator Chuck Jones from attending the Orange County Arts Awards April 19 at the Four Seasons Hotel in Newport Beach. Jones was named a Cultural Legacy Award winner at the event where arts visionaries Don and Joan Beall and Mary M. Muth also were recognized. About 400 people attended the event, which was chaired by Catherine Thyen.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
What's your favorite animated movie? Chances are, the team behind it was influenced by stop-motion and visual effects pioneer Ray Harryhausen, with maybe a dash of Looney Tunes titan Chuck Jones thrown in. And now you can see why. Two exhibitions curated by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences — "The Fantastical Worlds of Ray Harryhausen" and "Chuck Jones: An Animator's Life From A to Z-Z-Z-Z" — will display sketches, animation...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1997
The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences will salute award-winning animator Chuck Jones on Thursday with a screening of the theatrical version of "Peter and the Wolf" at the Academy Plaza Theatre. The 7:30 p.m. screening will be followed by a panel discussion with the film's creators. Stars of the 1996 film--including Kirstie Alley, Lloyd Bridges and Ross Mallinger--are expected to attend the event, which will be hosted by Roddy McDowall. Tickets are $15. Information: (818) 754-2890.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2002 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chuck Jones, the animator who helped give life to that wascally wabbit, the portly pig, the lisping duck and the tormented coyote, died Friday in his Corona del Mar home. He was 89. The three-time Oscar winner, whose career spanned more than 60 years and involved the creation of more than 300 animated films, died of congestive heart failure. His wife of 20 years, Marian, was at his side.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2000 | MICHELE BOTWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chuck Jones, the creative force behind such classic Looney Tunes cartoon characters as Road Runner, Wile E. Coyote, Pepe Le Pew and Marvin the Martian, has created a new animated character for the Web. The brainchild of the 87-year-old Jones, Timber Wolf will appear in a 13-episode online series on Warner Bros. Online and Entertaindom.com starting in late November.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chuck Jones, 65, an actor and vocal coach who worked with Edie Falco, William Hurt and Stanley Tucci, among others, died of heart failure Aug. 14 at his home in Kingston, N.Y. Born Charles Albertson Jones, he spent more than a decade acting in theater, television and films. He appeared in more than 40 productions on stages in New York and London from 1963 to 1974.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2012 | By Susan King
It's a Chuck Jones-a-thon weekend at the Alex Theatre and the American Cinematheque's Aero Theatre. The Chuck Jones Centennial Celebration Film Festival on Friday evening at the Alex Theatre in Glendale pays tribute to the late Oscar-winning animator-director who brought such Looney Tunes' characters to life as Wile E. Coyote, Road Runner and  Pepe Le Pew. Among the Jones cartoons being screened include “Rabbit Seasoning?,” “Robin Hood Daffy” and “Feed the Kitty.” Several animators and members of the Jones family will be participating as well as Carl Bell, who worked with Jones in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and animator-director Eric Goldberg, who directed “Pocahontas.” alextheatre/org.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2011 | By Steven Paul Leiva, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It seems that the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is in a quandary. Steven Spielberg, a not inconsequential member, wants his upcoming performance capture (or motion capture, as it's sometimes known) film, "The Adventures of Tintin," to compete in the best animated picture category for next year's Academy Awards. That's understandable; there's less competition, and it's doubtful that an adventure film based on a European comic book would be nominated by the academy for best picture.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Marcel Rasquin's " Hermano" opens the 14th Los Angeles Latino International Film Festival on Thursday at Grauman's Chinese Theatre in Hollywood. The seven-day event includes 25 narrative and 12 documentary features and 36 shorts from the Latin filmmaking community. The festival also features numerous filmmaker panels, parties and gala events. Except for openings and closing night programs, all screenings take place at the Mann Chinese 6 Cinemas; panels and seminars are holding court on the third floor of the Renaissance Hollywood Hotel Space, and the closing night gala screening of Carlos Carrera's " Backyard" is set for the Egyptian Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2010 | By Karen Wada, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Bugs Bunny will return to the Hollywood Bowl this week to help carry on two traditions — a tribute to Looney Tunes and other classic cartoons and the Bowl's efforts to showcase movie music and the artists who create it. The Bowl has long been a gateway and gathering place for Hollywood, says Arvind Manocha, chief operating officer of the Los Angeles Philharmonic Assn. "So it's natural that we want to celebrate the music of Hollywood by hearing it performed live while watching the movies for which it was written."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
What's your favorite animated movie? Chances are, the team behind it was influenced by stop-motion and visual effects pioneer Ray Harryhausen, with maybe a dash of Looney Tunes titan Chuck Jones thrown in. And now you can see why. Two exhibitions curated by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences — "The Fantastical Worlds of Ray Harryhausen" and "Chuck Jones: An Animator's Life From A to Z-Z-Z-Z" — will display sketches, animation...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chuck Jones, 65, an actor and vocal coach who worked with Edie Falco, William Hurt and Stanley Tucci, among others, died of heart failure Aug. 14 at his home in Kingston, N.Y. Born Charles Albertson Jones, he spent more than a decade acting in theater, television and films. He appeared in more than 40 productions on stages in New York and London from 1963 to 1974.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1995 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 32 years after the fabled Warner Bros. animation unit was shut down, leaving Chuck Jones hanging in midair, the veteran animator is once again turning out theatrical cartoons for the studio that gave birth to Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig and dozens of other familiar characters. First out of the gate from Chuck Jones Film Productions: "Chariots of Fur," the first Wile E. Coyote and Roadrunner cartoon directed by Jones in more than three decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
"If you were a young art student in 1931, the only thing you could really conceive of doing was graduating, going to Paris, getting a place among the chimney pots, painting and dying at some ancient age like 37--sort of like a male Camille," says Chuck Jones with a characteristic laugh. "But I came to the horrid realization that it costs money to die poor: You've got to get to Paris, rent an apartment, buy all those cobwebs--the whole bit."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2003 | Michael Mallory, Special to The Times
Turning any classic Hollywood film into a television series is not a challenge for the faint of heart. But when the film in question is one of the best-loved short cartoons of all time, it takes the most determined artisans who are willing to face the wrath of unforgiving toon-heads. Even so, Warner Bros.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2002 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Second of three parts ALLENSWORTH, Calif. -- Chuck Jones had heard the stories growing up in Oklahoma. Grapes as big as jade eggs and fields of cotton that didn't quit. Row after row, mile upon mile, it was all there for the picking in a giant valley in the middle of California. The son of a black tenant farmer, he could already taste the bitter that came with the Oklahoma land.
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