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Chuck Yeager

NEWS
May 23, 1986 | From a Times Staff Writer
Brig. Gen. Chuck Yeager's name will be on the report of the presidential commission investigating the Challenger space shuttle tragedy, commission Chairman William P. Rogers said Thursday. Two days after the retired general confirmed to a reporter that his name would not be on the report, his wife indicated that, although the hero of "The Right Stuff" gets quickly to the point, he is sometimes purposely off the point. "He's even told people: 'Yes, I've resigned,' " Glennis Yeager told UPI.
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NEWS
October 28, 1997
With all due respect to Col. Chuck Yeager and his many accomplishments, and I'm sure he has many besides breaking the sound barrier ("An American Ace," Oct. 8), there is not nearly enough credit given to the designers and builders of the X-1 rocket-powered plane. One man was lucky enough to be at the stick that day over the Mojave, but many hundreds more were responsible for the team effort that put his butt in that seat. In particular, it was liquid-fueled rocket technology that made the flight possible in 1947, a time when turbojet technology was still in its infancy.
NEWS
September 23, 1990 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Everyone in the aeronautics community knew they had the right stuff, and now the city of Lancaster has made it official. Chuck Yeager, Jimmy Doolittle, A. Scott Crossfield, Tony LeVier and Pete Knight--pilots who achieved dizzying heights in the early days of flight testing--became the first Saturday to be honored in Lancaster's Aerospace Walk of Honor. "They're sure a different breed of cat from the rest of us," said George Root, vice mayor of Lancaster.
NEWS
February 9, 1986 | ANN HEROLD
--Calling the flight "a piece of cake," legendary test pilot Chuck Yeager added three more speed records to his string, including coast-to-coast nonstop flight time for a class of turboprop plane. Yeager, who was the first man to break the sound barrier, piloted a Piper Cheyenne 400 LS from Burbank Airport to La Guardia Airport in New York in 5 hours, 23 minutes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2000 | RICHARD FAUSSET, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On Oct. 14, 1947, test pilot Chuck Yeager made this barren patch of desert one of the most hallowed spots in aviation history by breaking the sound barrier in a Bell X-1 research rocket aircraft. On Saturday, the 77-year-old retired brigadier general brought his flying skills and his aw-shucks West Virginia manner back to Edwards, where he and a fellow aerospace pioneer, Maj. Gen. Joe Engle, broke the sound barrier again in a pair of F-15s to kick off the base's annual Open House and Air Show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1997 | DARRELL SATZMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Almost 50 years to the day after he became the first person in history to pilot a jet faster than the speed of sound, retired Brig. Gen. Charles "Chuck" Yeager flew his final military mission Sunday, re-creating for tens of thousands of spectators the historic flight that helped launch the space age. At precisely 10 a.m.
NEWS
March 19, 1995
Hollywood's Walk of Fame and other landmarks may honor actors who play heroes with the right stuff. But Westchester celebrates the real thing. Westchester's "Flight Path"--a sort of Walk of Fame for the pioneers of aviation--is about to land at the, er, glamorous intersection of Sepulveda Boulevard and 89th Street. Or at least organizers would like it to.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1997 | DARRELL SATZMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Almost 50 years to the day after he became the first man in history to pilot a jet faster than the speed of sound, retired Brig. Gen. Charles "Chuck" Yeager flew his final military mission Sunday, re-creating for tens of thousands of appreciative spectators the historic flight that helped launch the Space Age. At precisely 10 a.m., a resounding boom rolled across an expansive dry lake bed, as Yeager, at the controls of an F-15 fighter jet, broke the sound barrier for the last time.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | DAVID NELSON
It may be the experience as a World War II flying ace and as the first man to break the sound barrier that gives one the toughness to comfortably slip on shoes previously worn by Sir Edmund Hillary and Jacques Cousteau and face 460 informed, eager listeners. Then again, this sort of fortitude may come naturally to Chuck Yeager, the retired Air Force brigadier general and aviation pioneer who came through with flying colors at Saturday's 10th annual "An Evening With . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2008 | Claire Noland, Times Staff Writer
Leo Janos, a former speechwriter for President Johnson whose ghostwriting talents were displayed in legendary test pilot Chuck Yeager's best-selling autobiography, has died. He was 74. Janos died of cancer Friday at his home in Brentwood, his wife, Bonnie, said Saturday. A longtime correspondent for Time magazine and a freelance nonfiction writer, Janos (pronounced Janice) sent his career into the stratosphere in 1985 with "Yeager: An Autobiography."
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