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Chukchansi Indians

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May 24, 1994 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scattered by a century of dispossession, the Chukchansi Indians barely cling to this mountain below Yosemite that was once homeland. They have no reservation or rancheria. Not quite squatters and not quite homesteaders, a few dozen families live on federal land allotted to them. In the language of bureaucrats, they are known as "allottees."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Madera County and the Chukchansi Indian tribe said the courts would have to decide their months-long argument over the tax status of the land on which the Chukchansi Gold Resort & Casino rests -- and the multimillion-dollar property tax bill that could go with it. Tax Assessor Thomas Kidwell says the land has the same designation that applies to the average homeowner, and property tax should be assessed the same way. It was appraised at $401 million.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Madera County and the Chukchansi Indian tribe said the courts would have to decide their months-long argument over the tax status of the land on which the Chukchansi Gold Resort & Casino rests -- and the multimillion-dollar property tax bill that could go with it. Tax Assessor Thomas Kidwell says the land has the same designation that applies to the average homeowner, and property tax should be assessed the same way. It was appraised at $401 million.
NEWS
May 24, 1994 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scattered by a century of dispossession, the Chukchansi Indians barely cling to this mountain below Yosemite that was once homeland. They have no reservation or rancheria. Not quite squatters and not quite homesteaders, a few dozen families live on federal land allotted to them. In the language of bureaucrats, they are known as "allottees."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2009 | Shelby Grad
Indian casinos in California will be allowed to add more than 3,000 new slot machines, a state commission has decided. The state's gaming commission agreed to the new slot machines after a federal court ruled that some Indian casinos were due them under contracts signed with the state. Most of the new slots will go to Northern California tribes, but some new machines will go to casinos in northern San Diego County and the Inland Empire. According to the California Gambling Control Commission, the machines are going to: Big Sandy Band Rancheria of Mono Indians, 1,650; Blue Lake Rancheria, 40; Cabazon Band of Mission Indians, 44; Cachil Dehe Band of Wintun Indians of the Colusa Indian Community, 427; Middletown Rancheria of Pomo Indians, 100; Mooretown Rancheria of Maidu Indians, 45; Paskenta Band of Nomalki Indians, 27; Picayune Rancheria of Chukchansi Indians, 200; Rincon Band of San Luiseno Mission Indians, 400; San Pasqual Band of Diegueno Mission Indians, 428; Tuolumne Band of Me-Wuk Indians, 187. Some officials hope the new slots will increase revenue to the cash-strapped state.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2004 | Michael Hiltzik
To any outsider looking in on California Indian politics, the apparent surge in tribal membership disputes over the last few years seems ugly in the extreme. Tribes with multimillion- dollar casinos are ejecting members by the score, questioning ties of heritage and blood that hadn't been challenged in three or four generations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2007 | David Kelly, Times Staff Writer
When Pechanga Indian leaders hired anthropologist John Johnson in 2004, they had one request: find out if the Madariaga clan were truly members of the tribe. Generations of them had grown up on the reservation. Family patriarch Lawrence Madariaga, 90, had built his home there, erected the local clinic, served on tribal committees and lived on Hunter Lane, named after his great-grandmother, Paulina Hunter. He even received a lifetime achievement award from the tribe.
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