Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsChumash Indians
IN THE NEWS

Chumash Indians

NEWS
March 21, 1991 | SUE REILLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Local square dancers were floored when they heard that Elaine's, the scene of their weekly do-si-dos in Granada Hills, was being turned into a bingo hall. Four groups affiliated with the Associated Square Dancers Assn. had used that floor for years, said Joy Myers, the association's senior director. "We didn't want them to have to break up, so we gave them a hand," she said. As it turned out, they gave many.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 13, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To Pilulaw Khus, a Chumash Indian spiritual leader, the weed-covered knoll near Niblick Road is a sacred place. She believes that buried in the mound are the remains of her ancestors, who lived here along the Salinas River for countless generations. But to Wal-Mart, the nation's largest retail chain, the knoll is an annoyance. Left alone, the little hill would obscure motorists' view of a planned Wal-Mart store and shopping mall.
NEWS
January 16, 1997 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Descending in a military helicopter, about 20 heavily armed federal agents and Santa Barbara County sheriff's deputies raided a Santa Cruz Island hunting ranch and arrested three workers on suspicion of crimes including destruction of Chumash grave sites and stealing human remains, officials said Wednesday.
TRAVEL
July 11, 2004 | Craig Nakano, Times Staff Writer
This valley of vineyards and horse ranches will get an injection of cosmopolitan flair this week with the grand opening of the Chumash Casino Resort's upscale hotel, the latest phase of a much-contested $150-million expansion. The interior of the 106-room hotel is a visual departure from the bustling, brassy casino next door, said John Martino, director of operations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1995 | KAY HWANGBO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Deep in the heart of Rocketdyne property in the Santa Susana Mountains, the Native American cave painting is so closely guarded that even the aerospace company's employees are not allowed to view it without special permission. Manny Tessier, a quality assurance manager for the firm, said the last time he saw the ancient, abstract drawings was in 1969, when he and a fellow worker visited the scooped-out rock formation on a whim.
NEWS
March 16, 2000 | From Associated Press
Three Chumash skeletal remains believed to be at least 200 years old were discovered near the carousel at the Santa Barbara Zoo. A zoo employee who was digging a ditch for a new electrical line uncovered part of a skull, jaw, leg bones and other remains about two feet below the surface. UC Santa Barbara forensic archeologist Phillip Walker determined they were Chumash remains belonging to a middle-aged woman, a man and a teenage male.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | JOHN McKINNEY
When Chumash leader Charlie Tiq Slo'w Cooke walks the trails of the Santa Monica Mountains, he walks where his ancestors walked thousands of years before him. He knows which plants nourish, which plants poison and which make good medicine. He knows the habits of birds and animals, the changes the seasons bring, the ceremonies that kept--and still keep--his people bonded to the earth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1991 | PSYCHE PASCUAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Chumash Indian group has criticized a developer for allowing excavation at an archeological site on the former MGM Ranch. Indians who visited the ranch last weekend found an eight-inch-deep trench at a site the Chumash consider one of the most significant in the Conejo Valley, said Richard Angulo, chairman of the California Indian Council Chumash. "The site was disturbed and left open," Angulo said. "It should have been covered up."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1994 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Authorities are investigating the apparently illegal grading of state parkland considered to have key historical and archeological significance as the site of a stagecoach route and a Native American settlement. State park officials said Friday they haven't determined who bulldozed up to five acres on the rocky slopes of the Santa Susana Mountains--in the process plowing across the Old Stage Coach Trail, which is on the National Register of Historic Places.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|