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Chumash Indians

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1995 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Skene has big plans for his piece of Malibu. On five wind-swept acres, he envisions a $1-million chateau with rose gardens overlooking the winding coastline. But Skene, 43, has yet to break ground more than a year after buying the vacant site for his dream home. The mortgage broker has been battling the city over a law requiring property owners to conduct archeological studies before construction.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2004 | Glenn F. Bunting, Times Staff Writer
Chumash Indians here tried to run Santa Barbara County Supervisor Gail Marshall out of office last year by actively supporting her recall election and again in March by demanding her resignation, accusing her of making derogatory remarks about the tribe. Marshall, a liberal Democrat whose stepson is married to a Chumash member, has criticized the tribe for using its sovereign powers to run roughshod over local zoning laws and land-use requirements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2003 | William Overend, Times Staff Writer
As law enforcement officials praised them for their community spirit, leaders of the Santa Ynez band of Chumash Indians announced Thursday that they are donating more than $158,000 in sophisticated crime lab equipment to police agencies throughout Santa Barbara County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2005 | Glenn F. Bunting, Times Staff Writer
State and federal authorities will investigate fresh concerns about casino regulation by the Chumash Indians after learning that the chairman of the tribe's gaming commission is a convicted felon. Gilbert Cash pleaded no contest in November to a felony charge of beating and choking his estranged wife. He was sentenced to 60 days in county jail and five years' probation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1989 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, Times Staff Writer
Chester King and Lynn Gamble hate the sound of bulldozers. As practicing archeologists, the Topanga Canyon couple know that where bulldozers go, Indian artifacts disappear. "We're talking about something that can never be regrown, that can never be brought back once it's gone," King said. Like Gamble, King would like to save all of California's archeological sites. "We want that data to be preserved," Gamble said, "or at least excavated in such a way that archeologists can use the data in the future."
NEWS
June 1, 1989 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, Times Staff Writer
Chester King and Lynn Gamble hate the sound of bulldozers. As practicing archeologists, the Topanga Canyon couple knows that where bulldozers go, Indian artifacts disappear. "We're talking about something that can never be regrown, that can never be brought back once it's gone," King said. Like Gamble, King would like to save all of California's archeological sites. "We want that data to be preserved," Gamble said, "or at least excavated in such a way that archeologists can use the data in the future."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2004 | Julie Tamaki and Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writers
It is a place of lush beauty, of rolling hills dotted by oaks and flanked by vineyards and mountains in the Santa Ynez Valley. There, the Chumash Indians and a private developer want to build as many as 500 luxury homes. There is just one problem. The 745-acre site is zoned for only about seven homes. So the Santa Ynez Band of Mission Indians plans to petition the federal government to convert the property to reservation land.
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, Times Staff Writer
Chester King and Lynn Gamble hate the sound of bulldozers. As archeologists, the Topanga Canyon couple know that where bulldozers go, Indian artifacts disappear. "We're talking about something that can never be regrown, that can never be brought back once it's gone," King said. Like Gamble, King would like to save all of California's archeological sites. "We want that data to be preserved," Gamble said, "or at least excavated in such a way that archeologists can use the data in the future."
NEWS
December 28, 1997 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Chumash descendant Teresa Raitt had been a bit more experienced researcher, or if curator John Johnson had been a bit less inquisitive, perhaps the sketches never would have been found. But thanks to Raitt's overzealous research at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History and Johnson's sharp eye, the two of them have unearthed crude sketches of the original floor plan of the historic San Buenaventura Mission--sketches Johnson calls one of a kind.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2005 | Steve Chawkins, Times Staff Writer
In a newly published paper, two scholars have revived the controversial and long-dead theory that Polynesian sailors visited the California coast centuries before the first European explorers planted their flags here. It might still be too soon, however, to swap out the Eureka on the state seal with an Aloha.
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