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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1988 | Associated Press
The Church of God In Christ, a Memphis-based denomination claiming 3.7 million members nationwide, has reelected Bishop J.O. Patterson Sr. as its leader and elected a Los Angeles bishop, Charles Blake, to its board. The predominantly black Pentecostal church selects a presiding bishop and a 12-member General Board every 4 years. The board is the administrative arm of the church.
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NATIONAL
September 24, 2009 | Peter Wallsten
For weeks, President Obama has tried to combat claims that his healthcare overhaul would mean tax dollars going toward abortions, calling the assertion a "myth." Today, his argument may gain some strength: A group of black church leaders who oppose abortion is set to endorse the president's health plan. The clergy -- led by Bishop Charles E. Blake Sr., a Los Angeles minister who heads the massive Church of God in Christ -- are scheduled to announce their support for the legislation at a news conference this morning.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1994 | JOHN DART
One of the last national church associations of overwhelmingly white denominations, the Pentecostal Fellowship of North America, plans to disband and form a racially mixed body. The new umbrella organization for as many as 25 denominations would end a longstanding religious division in a group that began, ironically, as an interracial movement in Los Angeles in 1906.
IMAGE
April 12, 2009 | Karen Grigsby Bates
This is going to date me, but it's true: When I was young, most black ladies wore hats to church. Easter was the true beginning of spring, the day when hats in spring colors blossomed throughout the congregation: yellow, peach, mint, lilac, pink. Even if the weather wasn't cooperating, the hats came out. At my home church, Dixwell Avenue Congregational in frosty New Haven, Conn., it wasn't unusual to see a lady wearing her spring finery beneath her mink coat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2007 | Rebecca Trounson, Times Staff Writer
Bishop Charles E. Blake, the influential pastor of one of Southern California's largest churches, has been named presiding bishop of his denomination, the Church of God in Christ, based in Memphis, Tenn. Blake, pastor of West Angeles Church of God in Christ in the Crenshaw district, was formally appointed this week to lead the Pentecostal, largely African American denomination, which claims about 6 million members in the United States and abroad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1987 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
When his bishop first introduced the Rev. Charles E. Blake, then 28, to his present congregation in Los Angeles, he faced hostility in the pews. The time was 1969, and the small West Angeles Church of God in Christ was engaged in a conflict with Bishop S. M. Crouch. Though the church pulpit was vacant after the death of its founding pastor, members had voted by a 4-1 margin to refuse any pastor appointed by Crouch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1996 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
With so much attention focused on Cardinal Roger M. Mahony's drive to build a new $45-million Roman Catholic cathedral downtown, it may surprise many that a major African American denomination is planning to build an equally costly cathedral of its own in the Crenshaw district. But that is precisely what Bishop Charles E. Blake, pastor of the West Angeles Church of God in Christ, has in mind. In fact, if all goes well, construction will begin early next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1998 | From Religion News Service
In what could signal a major breakthrough in ecumenical relations, the Church of God in Christ, the nation's largest black Pentecostal denomination, is considering an invitation to join the National Council of Churches, the nation's premier ecumenical agency. The invitation was offered April 15 by the Rev. Joan Brown Campbell, general secretary of the 34-member National Council of Churches at a meeting with the Pentecostal denomination's leaders during its general assembly in Memphis, Tenn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1992 | THUAN LE and ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A 23-year-old Riverside man was identified Wednesday as the suspected driver of a pickup truck that triggered the deadliest traffic accident in Orange County history. But police believe that the man, Fernando Hernandez Flores, might have fled to Mexico. At a 9 p.m.
NEWS
September 21, 1992 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Adelia Castro arrived at the hospital at 8 p.m. Sunday she did not know how much family she had left. Castro's husband, 4-year-old daughter, sister-in-law, niece and nephews had left Garden Grove three hours earlier in a van bound for church--as they did every Sunday afternoon. All she knew was that there had been a terrible accident. "No, no," she cried as she met another woman in the emergency waiting room of Coastal Communities Hospital. "All my family was there. I don't know."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2007 | Rebecca Trounson, Times Staff Writer
Bishop Charles E. Blake, the influential pastor of one of Southern California's largest churches, has been named presiding bishop of his denomination, the Church of God in Christ, based in Memphis, Tenn. Blake, pastor of West Angeles Church of God in Christ in the Crenshaw district, was formally appointed this week to lead the Pentecostal, largely African American denomination, which claims about 6 million members in the United States and abroad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
G.E. Patterson, the presiding bishop of the Church of God in Christ and a minister for almost 50 years, died of heart failure Tuesday in Memphis, Tenn., the church announced. He was 67. Patterson was hospitalized in January for an undisclosed illness and told his followers in 2005 that he had prostate cancer. The predominantly black Protestant denomination, with headquarters in Memphis, claims 6 million members worldwide and traces its origins to the late 1800s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2001 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Bishop Charles E. Blake Sr. can be forgiven his enthusiasm as he describes the moment an elderly African American man, pushing a shopping cart, recently paused in front of the huge, soon-to-open cathedral that Blake's church is building in Southwest Los Angeles. "He stood there for a long time," Blake said. When the passerby resumed his journey, it seemed to Blake that the old man's step was "a little more spry. He walked a little taller."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1998 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Openly defying his denomination's policy against women pastors, singer-minister Andrae Crouch will ordain his twin sister Aug. 1 as co-pastor of his church. "God told me to do it, regardless of who doesn't like it," said Crouch, who combines his careers as a minister and a popular gospel singer, composer and pianist, for which he has won nine Grammy Awards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1998 | From Religion News Service
In what could signal a major breakthrough in ecumenical relations, the Church of God in Christ, the nation's largest black Pentecostal denomination, is considering an invitation to join the National Council of Churches, the nation's premier ecumenical agency. The invitation was offered April 15 by the Rev. Joan Brown Campbell, general secretary of the 34-member National Council of Churches at a meeting with the Pentecostal denomination's leaders during its general assembly in Memphis, Tenn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1996 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
With so much attention focused on Cardinal Roger M. Mahony's drive to build a new $45-million Roman Catholic cathedral downtown, it may surprise many that a major African American denomination is planning to build an equally costly cathedral of its own in the Crenshaw district. But that is precisely what Bishop Charles E. Blake, pastor of the West Angeles Church of God in Christ, has in mind. In fact, if all goes well, construction will begin early next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1992 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The owner of a pickup truck that crashed into a church van Sunday, killing eight people and injuring 11, is believed to have left Southern California, authorities said Tuesday. David Martinez Palma, 23, who was initially identified as David Mendoza of Santa Ana, has not been seen by authorities since the crash, Orange County's most deadly accident, and may have gone to Phoenix. His wife, Cristina Mendoza, 21, left their rented home with their two children in a hurry Monday about 10 p.m.
NEWS
September 22, 1992 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pickup truck driver suspected of causing the deadliest automobile crash in Orange County history remained at large Monday after fleeing the accident, which left eight dead and 11 injured, most of them parishioners headed in a van to an evening church service. Authorities said the 1984 Chevrolet pickup, which slammed into a van carrying up to 18 people from the Non-Sectarian Church of God, was reported stolen Sunday night by the truck owner's wife.
NEWS
April 2, 1995
Bishop Louis Henry Ford, 81, leader of the 8.5-million-member Church of God in Christ. Ford began preaching in the countryside around Lexington, Miss., while attending college there in the early 1930s. He moved to Chicago in 1933 and preached on the street until founding St. Paul's in Chicago in 1935. Ford became bishop of Illinois in 1954 and in 1990 he was elected presiding bishop and chief executive of his Protestant denomination, headquartered in Memphis, Tenn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1994 | JOHN DART
One of the last national church associations of overwhelmingly white denominations, the Pentecostal Fellowship of North America, plans to disband and form a racially mixed body. The new umbrella organization for as many as 25 denominations would end a longstanding religious division in a group that began, ironically, as an interracial movement in Los Angeles in 1906.
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