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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2010 | Dennis McLellan
James Kavanaugh, a former Catholic priest who came to fame in 1967 with his controversial bestseller calling for reform in the church and later wrote bestselling books of poetry and other works, has died. He was 81. Kavanaugh, who underwent surgery for an aortic aneurysm in July, died Dec. 29 in a hospice in Kalamazoo, Mich., said his wife, Cathy. Ordained in 1954, Kavanaugh served as a parish priest in Lansing and Flint, Mich., and earned a doctorate at the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., before the publication of "A Modern Priest Looks at His Outdated Church" in 1967.
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OPINION
May 12, 2010 | Tim Rutten
"To live is to change," wrote the 19th century English Cardinal John Henry Newman, "and to be perfect is to have changed often." Pope Benedict XVI will preside over Newman's beatification — sainthood's honorific antechamber — when he visits Britain in September, but between now and then he's likely to hear growing demands for change in the governance of an ancient but scandal-ravaged institution In a stunningly blunt editorial, for...
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OPINION
March 25, 2002
Re "Priest Scandal Could Set History in Motion," Commentary, March 21: James Pinkerton's understanding of the current crisis within the Catholic Church, and indeed of the church itself, is so limited that I will find it hard to take him seriously on other issues in the future. That the church will suddenly change many of the doctrines that it has defended through fire and blood for 2,000 years because a vast minority of its priests have committed the sin and crime of pedophilia is just plain silly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2010 | Dennis McLellan
James Kavanaugh, a former Catholic priest who came to fame in 1967 with his controversial bestseller calling for reform in the church and later wrote bestselling books of poetry and other works, has died. He was 81. Kavanaugh, who underwent surgery for an aortic aneurysm in July, died Dec. 29 in a hospice in Kalamazoo, Mich., said his wife, Cathy. Ordained in 1954, Kavanaugh served as a parish priest in Lansing and Flint, Mich., and earned a doctorate at the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., before the publication of "A Modern Priest Looks at His Outdated Church" in 1967.
NEWS
October 13, 1988 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
The white-brick monastery across a busy street from a Shell service station seems an unlikely place for a confrontation that now involves Mother Teresa, the Nobel Peace Prize winner, and that ultimately may be decided by Pope John Paul II. It is a dispute so heated that police have been summoned twice to separate feuding nuns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2003 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
With prayers and sadness, the nation's Roman Catholic bishops convened Thursday for what one leading prelate called "a pretty sober gathering," determined to regroup after a tumultuous week of controversy. The bishops defended their record and accomplishments on fighting sexual abuse in the year since they met in Dallas and adopted a landmark set of rules to prevent priests from molesting children. They vowed to press ahead to fulfill their commitments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1988 | From United Press International
The head of one of the most prestigious Jesuit schools in the United States said declining numbers of men entering the priesthood means that the Roman Catholic Church either must consider having a married clergy, ordaining women or giving a greater role to lay people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1987 | Associated Press
The United Methodist hymnal committee put the finishing touches this week on a revised songbook for the 9-million-member denomination after almost three years of debate, research and prayer. Committee members weathered storms of controversy to produce the book of 624 hymns, which will be presented in April to the denomination's General Conference meeting in St. Louis. If the revised hymnal is approved by the General Conference, it will be published by December, 1989, church officials say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1999 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
The night before Pope John Paul II arrived this week in St. Louis, 500 Roman Catholic dissidents bundled themselves against the cold and listened quietly as a prayer leader intoned the names of saintly women of faith. As each name was read--Mary Magdalene, Joan of Arc, Edith Stein, Mother Teresa--the crowd responded, "Pray for us."
NATIONAL
December 19, 2002 | From Reuters
Bishop Richard G. Lennon, chosen by Pope John Paul II to temporarily replace Cardinal Bernard Law as leader of the Archdiocese of Boston, on Wednesday called for a truce in clergy sexual abuse litigation so that talks can proceed toward a settlement with victims.
NATIONAL
June 18, 2005 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
With little debate, the nation's Roman Catholic bishops Friday extended by five years safeguards to protect children and youth from sexual predators within the church. The decision by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, meeting here for their spring session, reaffirmed the U.S. church's "zero tolerance" policy hammered out at the height of the sexual abuse scandal in 2002.
NATIONAL
June 17, 2005 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
The nation's Roman Catholic bishops were expected today to reauthorize a 3-year-old "zero tolerance" policy to prevent the sexual abuse of minors and to weed offending clergy out of public ministry. But protesters outside the Fairmont Hotel, where the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops is holding its annual spring meeting, charged that proposed changes in the policy would weaken the church's commitment to safeguard children and youth from sexual predators.
NATIONAL
December 15, 2004 | From Associated Press
After months of resistance and round-the-clock vigils at several churches, archdiocese officials Tuesday reversed a decision to close one parish, and will reevaluate four other planned closings. Archbishop Sean Patrick O'Malley's decision to shutter or consolidate 83 churches by year's end came in response to declining attendance, a shortage of priests and financial pressure caused in part by the clergy sex abuse crisis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2004 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
Moving to assert control over three breakaway parishes, the Episcopal bishop of Los Angeles on Friday appointed two assistant bishops to serve the congregations and said he would appoint new lay governing boards. The move by the Rt. Rev. J. Jon Bruno, communicated in letters dated Sept. 1 but delivered Friday, escalated what probably will be a protracted legal battle over ownership of the parish property and Bruno's jurisdiction over the breakaway priests.
WORLD
February 24, 2004 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
A panel of scientists and psychiatrists, in a long-awaited report released Monday, offered recommendations for preventing the sexual abuse of children by Roman Catholic priests but emphatically rejected the U.S. church's "zero-tolerance" policy of defrocking offenders. The policy can discourage abusive clerics from seeking help or recklessly unleash pedophiles into society once they are ousted from the church, the report said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2003 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
The Mass -- the liturgical observance of the death and Resurrection of Christ -- is as familiar to Roman Catholics as it is central to their worship. But some things are changing, and they will become increasingly apparent in the next several weeks as 4.2 million Catholics in the Los Angeles Archdiocese are asked to adjust to new ways of doing things.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2002 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
The nation's Roman Catholic bishops overwhelmingly approved a policy on sexually abusive priests Wednesday that they say maintains their stance of "zero tolerance" but provides accused priests with procedural protections that Vatican officials had insisted on. The policy approved by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops will have the force of mandatory church law after it receives the final approval of the Vatican, which is expected to happen quickly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2002 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
Vatican officials are expected today to turn down central elements of the sexual abuse policy adopted by U.S. bishops last June. Pope John Paul II met privately Thursday with several leading U.S. bishops as the Vatican completed its long-awaited response to the "zero tolerance" policy that would discipline priests accused of sexually molesting minors.
NATIONAL
November 9, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The nation's Roman Catholic bishops are cooperating with the review board created to monitor their responses to clerical sexual abuse, the board's interim chairwoman said at a Milwaukee conference. Anne Burke, an Illinois appellate judge, said 76% of America's dioceses and other units of the church have reported information about sexual abuse victims and perpetrators for a survey sponsored by the National Review Board. The survey, based on the reports, is scheduled to be released in February.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"Rebel. Genius. Liberator." Who could those movie poster words possibly describe? A new Vin Diesel action hero? A different kind of secret agent? Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld? Good guesses, but wrong, wrong, wrong. The answer is "Luther."
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