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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2001 | WILLIAM LOBDELL and JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Long before this week's controversial Supreme Court decision, hundreds of public schools across Southern California had been renting space to churches without fanfare or controversy. Religious groups have rented rooms in 126 Los Angeles schools this year; Jehovah's Witnesses used 61 schools as their sanctuaries in April. Sixty percent of the campuses in a south Orange County school system turn into makeshift churches on Sunday mornings.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2001 | Deniene Husted, (714) 966-5908
Members of St. Philip Benizi Catholic Church, forced out of their sanctuary in August when arson gutted the 50-year-old structure, will be able to worship in relative comfort by the end of the month, church officials said. Congregants have withstood bitter cold and violent winds while observing Mass in a large tent set up on the Gilbert Avenue church yard. "We almost blew out of the tent during Mass on Christmas Day," Father Ignatius M. Kissel said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2000 | DENIENE HUSTED, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Worshipers at St. Philip Benizi Catholic Church often shudder during the early morning Masses delivered by Father Ignatius M. Kissel. The message of God's love is inspiring, but it's the biting chill in the air that gets to them the most these days. "It's cold," said Dorothy Flowers, a 20-year member of the parish, "particularly when it's 42 degrees outside. I don't know how long we can stand it."
NEWS
November 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
A pastor who challenged the authority of the Internal Revenue Service braced along with his congregation for the seizure of their Baptist church today for refusal to pay a $6-million tax debt. Experts have said they believe the case is the first in which the federal government has confiscated a church in a tax dispute. Last month, a federal judge ordered the Rev. Greg A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2000 | ANA BEATRIZ CHOLO and HECTOR BECERRA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The parishioners of Fullerton's St. Philip Benizi Catholic Church don't know whether it was a hate crime that gutted their sanctuary Thursday. The fire is the second at the church in four months. But to the many people whose history is inextricably tied to the church, it hardly matters--it hurts all the same. "I went to grade school here. I had my sacraments here. I was married here," said Diane McCard, weeping outside the fire-raked church as her husband and 4-year-old daughter stood near.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2000 | THUY-DOAN LE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Arson is suspected in a fire that gutted a Fullerton church Thursday, the second blaze to strike the church in four months. Officials at St. Philip Benizi Church declared the sanctuary to be a total loss. A dozen firefighting vehicles responded to the four-alarm fire at 235 S. Pine St. The blaze was reported at the back of the sanctuary at 2:21 p.m. and was contained at 3:22 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2000 | LEX WOODBURY, Lex Woodbury teaches Greek at Fuller Theological Seminary's extension site in Irvine. He can be reached at wdbrymin@deltanet.com
Turn the other cheek! Does that mean I am supposed to let people beat me up and not defend myself? That was my question when I first heard Matthew 5:39 in church school: "Do not resist evil. If someone strikes you on the right cheek, turn to him the other also."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1999 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Candice Kerns, an all-star student athlete at Los Angeles Baptist High School who had compassion for people and a love for animals, died Tuesday after a brief illness. She was 15. Candice, who would have celebrated her 16th birthday Friday, had been hospitalized with leukemia since Dec. 7, according to Father Gregory Safchuk of St. Innocent Orthodox Church in Tarzana, where the Kerns family worships.
NEWS
September 18, 1999 | CLAUDIA KOLKER and ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The vague profile of Larry Gene Ashbrook, who authorities say killed seven churchgoers, wounded seven more, then killed himself, developed more dimensions Friday, even as this city fought for perspective on the havoc Ashbrook wrought. The man most people first learned of after his Wednesday rampage at Wedgwood Baptist Church called and wrote to newspapers, feared imagined persecutors--and may have mingled with Texas hate groups, people who had met him said.
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