Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsChurches San Fernando Valley
IN THE NEWS

Churches San Fernando Valley

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1998 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of St. Mark's Lutheran Church, which is down to fewer than 60 aging members, decided more than a year ago to close its doors with dignity and give the bulk of its assets to a fledgling church St. Mark's helped to start in the Santa Clarita Valley seven years ago. At 3 p.m. June 28, after nearly 50 years in existence, St. Mark's will hold a final service in its church at the corner of 5th Street and Hubbard Avenue.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2000 | BOBBY CUZA
A victim of the Columbine High School shootings will speak about his terrifying experience and remarkable recovery at two Valley churches this weekend. Mark Taylor, 16, who survived seven bullets to the torso, thigh and arm, will speak to congregations at Calvary Church in West Hills at 6:30 p.m. Saturday and New Hope Church in Westlake Village at 10 a.m. Sunday. Also speaking will be his physician, William Deagle, who, like Taylor, is a born-again Christian.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1994 | ERIC SLATER
In a musical show of Christian solidarity, members of a Shadow Hills church will gather to sing and raise money for another congregation, whose North Hollywood sanctuary was shaken to its foundations by the Northridge earthquake. Damage from the Jan. 17 temblor left the main worship hall of the First Presbyterian Church a shambles, and the small congregation, about 140 of whom attend services on an average Sunday, facing a $1-million bill to rebuild.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1998 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of St. Mark's Lutheran Church, which is down to fewer than 60 aging members, decided more than a year ago to close its doors with dignity and give the bulk of its assets to a fledgling church St. Mark's helped to start in the Santa Clarita Valley seven years ago. At 3 p.m. June 28, after nearly 50 years in existence, St. Mark's will hold a final service in its church at the corner of 5th Street and Hubbard Avenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1994 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Demolition work has begun on the First Presbyterian Church of North Hollywood, the first house of worship in the San Fernando Valley to be torn down because of damage from January's earthquake. Several other local congregations, facing varying amounts of damage, are still trying to decide between repairing or rebuilding their churches. Dust and debris filled the red-tagged Presbyterian church building as about 80 members of the congregation, led by the Rev.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1995 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To outsiders, the cathedral-like, gold-domed Greek Orthodox church sitting on a knoll in Northridge appeared unshaken by the January, 1994, earthquake. But, in fact, St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church sustained $1.7 million in interior damage to its soaring mosaics, walls and windows. Only this month has its 1,100-family congregation been able to worship without scaffolding blocking the view of its Byzantine-style artwork.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1995 | FRANK MANNING
Our Lady of the Valley Catholic Church in Canoga Park, which was badly damaged in the Northridge earthquake, will be rededicated today, church officials said. Since the earthquake, Mass has been celebrated in the parish hall and in a large tent, the Rev. John D. Murray, the church's pastor, said. "There was a certain intimacy to those settings," he said, "but after a while, that began to get old, as they say, and people were anxious to get back into the church."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1995 | FRANK MANNING
Spirited by a $693,500 federal loan, Emerson Unitarian Church's congregation is dreaming of the day when, like the mythical phoenix, their earthquake-devastated church will rise again. The money, they say, has given wings to plans to build a new church to replace the 70-year-old building in Canoga Park that has been their home for a quarter-century. The structure, built in the classical Greek style, replaced another church that was gutted by fire in 1921.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1994 | JOHN DART
Checks totaling more than $325,000 for repairing earthquake-damaged church buildings were mailed recently to 20 San Fernando Valley-area congregations of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). "The pastors of the churches are calling us and saying the checks were a real shot in the arm," said the Rev. Robert Fernandez, a church administrator based in Panorama City. Denominational officials in Louisville, Ky.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1995 | ERROL A. COCKFIELD Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
As President Clinton joined the nation in mourning the victims of the Oklahoma City bombing Sunday, parishioners at San Fernando Valley churches added their prayers in hopes that some might still be saved from the wreckage of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building. But as rescuers continued for a fourth day their dismal mission of scouring the nine-story wreck, answers to prayers seemed unlikely. Still, they prayed, many filled with the anger of a nation outraged by the slaughter of innocents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1995 | FRANK MANNING
Our Lady of the Valley Catholic Church in Canoga Park, which was badly damaged in the Northridge earthquake, will be rededicated today, church officials said. Since the earthquake, Mass has been celebrated in the parish hall and in a large tent, the Rev. John D. Murray, the church's pastor, said. "There was a certain intimacy to those settings," he said, "but after a while, that began to get old, as they say, and people were anxious to get back into the church."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1995 | FRANK MANNING
Spirited by a $693,500 federal loan, Emerson Unitarian Church's congregation is dreaming of the day when, like the mythical phoenix, their earthquake-devastated church will rise again. The money, they say, has given wings to plans to build a new church to replace the 70-year-old building in Canoga Park that has been their home for a quarter-century. The structure, built in the classical Greek style, replaced another church that was gutted by fire in 1921.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1995 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To outsiders, the cathedral-like, gold-domed Greek Orthodox church sitting on a knoll in Northridge appeared unshaken by the January, 1994, earthquake. But, in fact, St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church sustained $1.7 million in interior damage to its soaring mosaics, walls and windows. Only this month has its 1,100-family congregation been able to worship without scaffolding blocking the view of its Byzantine-style artwork.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1995 | ERROL A. COCKFIELD Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
As President Clinton joined the nation in mourning the victims of the Oklahoma City bombing Sunday, parishioners at San Fernando Valley churches added their prayers in hopes that some might still be saved from the wreckage of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building. But as rescuers continued for a fourth day their dismal mission of scouring the nine-story wreck, answers to prayers seemed unlikely. Still, they prayed, many filled with the anger of a nation outraged by the slaughter of innocents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1994 | JOHN DART
Checks totaling more than $325,000 for repairing earthquake-damaged church buildings were mailed recently to 20 San Fernando Valley-area congregations of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). "The pastors of the churches are calling us and saying the checks were a real shot in the arm," said the Rev. Robert Fernandez, a church administrator based in Panorama City. Denominational officials in Louisville, Ky.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1994 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Demolition work has begun on the First Presbyterian Church of North Hollywood, the first house of worship in the San Fernando Valley to be torn down because of damage from January's earthquake. Several other local congregations, facing varying amounts of damage, are still trying to decide between repairing or rebuilding their churches. Dust and debris filled the red-tagged Presbyterian church building as about 80 members of the congregation, led by the Rev.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2000 | BOBBY CUZA
A victim of the Columbine High School shootings will speak about his terrifying experience and remarkable recovery at two Valley churches this weekend. Mark Taylor, 16, who survived seven bullets to the torso, thigh and arm, will speak to congregations at Calvary Church in West Hills at 6:30 p.m. Saturday and New Hope Church in Westlake Village at 10 a.m. Sunday. Also speaking will be his physician, William Deagle, who, like Taylor, is a born-again Christian.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1994 | ERIC SLATER
In a musical show of Christian solidarity, members of a Shadow Hills church will gather to sing and raise money for another congregation, whose North Hollywood sanctuary was shaken to its foundations by the Northridge earthquake. Damage from the Jan. 17 temblor left the main worship hall of the First Presbyterian Church a shambles, and the small congregation, about 140 of whom attend services on an average Sunday, facing a $1-million bill to rebuild.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|