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SPORTS
April 26, 1990 | From Reuters
Fewer bettors went to Churchill Downs race track last year, helping to cut the pay out for the famous home of the Kentucky Derby by 5.7%, although it still reported its second best year in history Wednesday. Profits for Churchill Downs Inc. slumped to $4.16 million from the previous year, marking the first time that earnings declined at the track in six years. Profits were hurt by a 10% slump in attendance to 1,039,112 and a 14% drop in on-track betting.
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SPORTS
May 6, 2005 | Bill Christine
One of the differences between the old and the rebuilt Churchill Downs can be found at the men's rooms. The lettering on the doors now reads, "Gentlemen." "How clever," said a wag from California. "Naming them after a Hollywood Gold Cup winner [1997]." There's more, of course, to the $121 million in improvements that Churchill has made on an ambitious project that began in July 2002.
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SPORTS
May 19, 1988 | Bill Christine
Paul Berube, who heads the Thoroughbred Racing Protective Bureau, a national security organization based in New York, was asked what he thought of the first race at Churchill Downs on Kentucky Derby day this year. With heavy sarcasm, Berube said: "No matter what's uncovered or not uncovered, I imagine this whole thing will go down as another chapter in American racing folklore."
SPORTS
February 16, 2005 | Bill Christine
Churchill Downs, where 14 jockeys walked out in November, protesting that they were underinsured, announced Tuesday that it would pay most of the costs for new riders' accident coverage that will top out at $1 million. Churchill also said that it would buy the increased coverage for five other tracks that it owns. At another Churchill track, Hollywood Park, jockeys are covered by workers' compensation insurance, which is paid for by trainers and owners of the horses.
SPORTS
November 2, 1991 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The defection of In Excess from today's $3-million Breeders' Cup Classic has given horse-of-the-year hopes to trainers who would appear to be thinking wishfully. Bobby Frankel lobbies for Marquetry, who is not even an afterthought in most horse-of-the-year talk. "This is the championship race," Frankel said. "You can't win the championship if you pull out of the seventh game of the World Series."
SPORTS
May 7, 1999 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Churchill Downs, fresh from running the Kentucky Derby for the 125th time, bought Hollywood Park on Thursday--lock, stock and nearby casino--and in discussing the dynamics of the $140-million deal, Tom Meeker, president of Churchill Downs, used an analogy about two drivers arriving at an intersection at the same time. "We're both stopped," Meeker said of the two cars. "[R.D.
SPORTS
May 6, 2001 | GRAHAME L. JONES and BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Churchill Downs track was so fast Saturday that track records were broken in three of the first four races. The Bob Baffert-trained and Gary Stevens-ridden Love At Noon broke the track record for 6 1/2 furlongs by four-tenths of a second, winning the first race in 1:14 1/5, bettering Bet On Sunshine's mark set in July of last year.
SPORTS
February 16, 2005 | Bill Christine
Churchill Downs, where 14 jockeys walked out in November, protesting that they were underinsured, announced Tuesday that it would pay most of the costs for new riders' accident coverage that will top out at $1 million. Churchill also said that it would buy the increased coverage for five other tracks that it owns. At another Churchill track, Hollywood Park, jockeys are covered by workers' compensation insurance, which is paid for by trainers and owners of the horses.
SPORTS
October 29, 2000 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the 17th edition of the Breeders' Cup races returns to Churchill Downs for a record fifth time next Saturday, the 100-plus horses running will be hard-pressed to match what has gone on before at Louisville's historic twin-spired track. The previous Breeders' Cups at Churchill have been stuffed with scintillating races, record-breaking performances and, for the suffering horseplayers, a nice sprinkling of longshot payoffs. Not to mention sometimes uncomfortable conditions.
SPORTS
June 22, 1995 | BOB MIESZERSKI
Following experiments already done in Pennsylvania and New York, Churchill Downs and ODS Technologies have agreed to test an interactive wagering system enabling players to watch and bet races from their homes. The Kentucky State Racing Commission gave its approval Wednesday to the project, scheduled to begin in Louisville by the middle of the summer and conclude by the end of 1995.
SPORTS
November 19, 2004 | Bill Christine, Times Staff Writer
Shane Sellers and Eddie King are the contrasting faces of the Jockeys' Guild. Sellers, loyal to the core, is asking for greater unity among guild members. King, a former guild officer and ousted board member, is suing the organization that represents more than 1,200 jockeys. "What would happen," Sellers wondered from his home in Kentucky, "if on Jan. 1 all the guild riders told the tracks that they were going fishing? No matter what happens, we're the ones who put on the show.
SPORTS
May 6, 2001 | GRAHAME L. JONES and BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Churchill Downs track was so fast Saturday that track records were broken in three of the first four races. The Bob Baffert-trained and Gary Stevens-ridden Love At Noon broke the track record for 6 1/2 furlongs by four-tenths of a second, winning the first race in 1:14 1/5, bettering Bet On Sunshine's mark set in July of last year.
SPORTS
October 29, 2000 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the 17th edition of the Breeders' Cup races returns to Churchill Downs for a record fifth time next Saturday, the 100-plus horses running will be hard-pressed to match what has gone on before at Louisville's historic twin-spired track. The previous Breeders' Cups at Churchill have been stuffed with scintillating races, record-breaking performances and, for the suffering horseplayers, a nice sprinkling of longshot payoffs. Not to mention sometimes uncomfortable conditions.
SPORTS
May 5, 2000 | BILL CHRISTINE
In 1895, a young architect, taken with a single spire atop a nearby mental institution, designed two spires that were built on the roof of the new grandstand at Churchill Downs. The twin spires, the brainchild of Joseph Baldez, have become the most recognizable feature of Churchill and the Kentucky Derby, and one of the most recognizable landmarks in sports. They've been called towers, cupolas and steeples by visitors to the Derby, but to the locals they can only be the spires.
SPORTS
May 7, 1999 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Churchill Downs, fresh from running the Kentucky Derby for the 125th time, bought Hollywood Park on Thursday--lock, stock and nearby casino--and in discussing the dynamics of the $140-million deal, Tom Meeker, president of Churchill Downs, used an analogy about two drivers arriving at an intersection at the same time. "We're both stopped," Meeker said of the two cars. "[R.D.
SPORTS
May 7, 1999 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marje Everett, ousted as the head of Hollywood Park when R.D. Hubbard took over in 1990, welcomed the arrival of Churchill Downs as the new owner of the Inglewood track, while remaining deeply critical of the Hubbard regime. Everett, a veteran racing executive in Chicago--her father owned Arlington Park--by the time she arrived at Hollywood Park in 1970, is still a Hollywood Park shareholder.
SPORTS
November 2, 1991 | JOHN CHERWA, TIMES ASSOCIATE SPORTS EDITOR
The National Pick Seven, the first attempt to form a nationwide betting pool, is off to a fast start, causing some racing officials to speculate that the final pool will approach $20 million. At mid-afternoon Friday, Churchill Downs announced that an estimated $1.5 million had been bet on the wager, which requires picking the winners of all seven Breeders' Cup races.
SPORTS
November 2, 1991 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A look at today's seven Breeders' Cup races at Churchill Downs: $1-MILLION SPRINT--SIX FURLONGS Housebuster suffered an irritated hoof in a workout at Keeneland last week, but trainer Jimmy Croll said that there is no infection and the minor injury won't affect the colt's performance. Injury kept Housebuster out of last year's Breeders' Cup, but he still was voted champion sprinter, and now he has three consecutive victories to take him into his career finale.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1999 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Odds are Hollywood Park Inc. soon will be changing its name. By entering talks to sell its namesake horse-racing track in Inglewood to Kentucky Derby host Churchill Downs Inc., Hollywood Park is taking its boldest step yet away from its racing roots and toward its main business of today--gaming. Never mind that Hollywood Park Chairman Randall D. Hubbard also personally owns racehorses.
SPORTS
April 23, 1999 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With agents from Churchill Downs skulking around, kicking the tractor tires and checking the barn roofs for leaks, Hollywood Park may have an ownership change before the spring-summer season is too far along. The 66-day meet opens tonight under the stewardship of chairman R.D. Hubbard, but Churchill Downs is in the wings, hoping to make a deal. The Louisville track, which will run the 125th Kentucky Derby a week from Saturday, announced April 1 that it was trying to buy Hollywood Park.
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