Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCia
IN THE NEWS

Cia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 12, 1985 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Veteran network correspondent Sam Jaffe, who was forced to spend the final years of his life denying that he was a Soviet spy, is dead of cancer. Jaffe was 55 when he died Friday at his home in Bethesda, Md., a suburb of Washington. Jaffe had been a correspondent for Life magazine and CBS before joining ABC television in 1960.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 16, 2014
Re "Declassify, debate, move on," Opinion, April 11 Jeffrey H. Smith, a former CIA general counsel, predictably thinks that agency officers who conducted waterboarding and other acts of torture should not be prosecuted for "activities that were properly authorized and executed. " Those in the Bush administration and the CIA who authorized and carried out torture and other illegal acts should not hide behind dubious "legal" opinions written by people who knew or should have known the actions were illegal under U.S. and international law. Yes, declassify all, not just part, of the Senate's report on the CIA's rendition, detention and interrogation programs.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1994
Now we know why NASA has never been able to relocate the lost Mars space probe. They hired the CIA to look for it. BOB MILLS Studio City
NATIONAL
April 11, 2014 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - A secret Senate report on the CIA's treatment of Al Qaeda detainees from 2001 to 2006 concludes that the spy agency used brutal, unauthorized interrogation techniques, misrepresented key elements of the program to policymakers and the public, and actively sought to undermine congressional oversight, officials who have read the report say. Contrary to previous assertions by President George W. Bush and CIA leaders, the use of harsh interrogation...
OPINION
February 2, 2013
Re "Former CIA officer sentenced in leak case," Jan. 26 The Justice Department will not prosecute CIA officials who approved or conducted "enhanced interrogations," and yet it goes after the man who blew the whistle on these practices. I suppose it is too much to hope that Obama will commute the sentence of John Kiriakou, as President George W. Bush did for I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby. Jean Koch Los Angeles ALSO: Letters: Researching marijuana Letters: Women deserve a fighting chance Letters: Who should pay for illegal immigration?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2013 | By Alan Eyerly
It's nearly two months after America's “second 9/11,” a horrific bombing at the Central Intelligence Agency in Langley, Va., that left 219 people dead and sparked a global manhunt for the person believed responsible. That's the setup for “Tinman is Down,” the Season 3 premiere of Showtime's “Homeland” series starring Claire Danes, winner of two consecutive Emmy Awards for her portrayal of bipolar CIA case officer Carrie Mathison. In last season's finale, Carrie bid farewell at the Canadian border to her lover, Marine Sgt.-turned-Congressman Nick Brody (Damian Lewis)
OPINION
April 16, 2014
Re "Declassify, debate, move on," Opinion, April 11 Jeffrey H. Smith, a former CIA general counsel, predictably thinks that agency officers who conducted waterboarding and other acts of torture should not be prosecuted for "activities that were properly authorized and executed. " Those in the Bush administration and the CIA who authorized and carried out torture and other illegal acts should not hide behind dubious "legal" opinions written by people who knew or should have known the actions were illegal under U.S. and international law. Yes, declassify all, not just part, of the Senate's report on the CIA's rendition, detention and interrogation programs.
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian and Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON   - The Senate voted Thursday to confirm John Brennan as director of the Central Intelligence Agency, ending weeks of delay as lawmakers sought access to secret Obama administration documents about the targeted killing of militants overseas and the Sept. 11 attacks last year that killed four Americans in Benghazi, Libya. The 63 to 34 vote came a day after Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) launched a rare and dramatic form of filibuster - talking for nearly 13 hours Wednesday on the Senate floor  - to express concerns that the Obama administration had not categorically ruled out authority to use a drone to target an American on U.S. soil.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1996
Crackgate: The CIA made me do it. GEORGE H. McCARTY Highland
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | by Jenny Hendrix
Amazon can already track your book purchases, recommend titles based on your latest browsing history, and is annoyingly great at peppering the websites you see with ads based on your shopping habits.  So would it surprise you to learn that the online bookseller is getting into the intelligence game? Federal Computer Week, a magazine that covers technology and the federal government, is reporting that Amazon has signed a contract with the CIA , agreeing to help the agency develop cloud computing technology over the next decade.  While the magazine's anonymous sources confirmed the $600-million deal, Amazon, America's largest online book retailer, and the CIA both declined to confirm it.  "As a general rule, the CIA does not publicly disclose details of our contracts, the identities of our contractors, the contract values, or the scope of work," a CIA spokesperson told FCW. If the details reported are true, it will be a game-changer for both the online retailer and the Central Intelligence Agency.  Amazon Web Services will help the CIA to build a "private cloud," which means the computing technologies will be hosted at the CIA's own data center, allaying fears about the security of intelligence information online.  The Amazon-built cloud will help the CIA keep up with emerging technologies.  While these specifics are a bit confusing for the non-computer-literate, suffice it to say the deal is big news for both entities.  There is a lot of competition...
OPINION
April 10, 2014 | By Jeffrey H. Smith
Last week, the Senate Intelligence Committee, led by Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), voted to declassify parts of its report on the CIA's rendition, detention and interrogation program. The White House, the CIA and the Senate still have to negotiate which portions of the report will be redacted before it is made public. But this is an important step in resolving the ugly dispute that has erupted between the intelligence committee and the intelligence agency. The dispute presents two very serious questions.
REAL ESTATE
April 8, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
More than a year after it approved a report critical of the CIA's interrogation and detention policies, the Senate Intelligence Committee has voted to make a portion of the document public. It's now up to President Obama to ensure that the agency doesn't mount a rear-guard attempt to censor or sanitize the committee's findings in the name of national security. Thanks to news reports and a report by the CIA's inspector general, Americans long have been aware of both the broad outlines and some abhorrent details of the Bush administration's mistreatment of suspected terrorists after 9/11.
NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Cathleen Decker
Hillary Rodham Clinton's comment last week that women face a double standard in politics raised eyebrows. And then came former CIA and NSA director Michael Hayden to prove her point. It happened in reference to Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, who has been embroiled in a battle with the CIA over a Senate report that detailed the spy agency's actions in the wake of the Sept. 11 attacks. “If the Senate can declassify this report, we will be able to ensure that an un-American, brutal program of detention and interrogation will never again be considered or permitted,” Feinstein, who as head of the Senate Intelligence Committee has certainly been privy to the report's findings, said last month.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2014 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - The CIA's chief of Iran operations was placed on paid administrative leave and sent home from agency headquarters after an internal investigation found he had created an abusive and hostile work environment that put a crucial division in disarray, according to current and former officials. Officers and analysts in the Iran operations division, which coordinates spying on Iran and its nuclear program, were informed at a meeting last week at CIA headquarters in Langley, Va., of the decision to suspend Jonathan Bank, a veteran officer and member of the senior intelligence service.
WORLD
March 15, 2014 | By Zulfiqar Ali
PESHAWAR, Pakistan - A Pakistani tribal court on Saturday reduced the prison sentence for the doctor identified as helping the CIA track down Osama bin Laden from 33 years to 23 years. Shakil Afridi, convicted in 2012 of links to a banned militant group, was cleared of one of the charges against him: that he sought to wage war against Pakistan. Afridi was arrested by Pakistani authorities shortly after U.S. commandos killed the former Al Qaeda chief in a town outside Islamabad in May 2011.
NEWS
March 13, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - A bitter public fight between Sen. Dianne Feinstein and CIA Director John Brennan has got President Obama caught between a powerful political ally and a trusted senior advisor - and on Wednesday he showed what an uncomfortable place that is. In his first public remarks on the clash, Obama tried not to take sides in the dispute that has erupted over whether Senate staffers improperly removed a sensitive document from CIA files, as...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1994
In view of the Soviet Union's collapse while having the CIA on its side, perhaps we should consider renting the CIA to the North Koreans for a while. CLINT EVERETT San Diego
NATIONAL
March 13, 2014 | By David Horsey
California Sen. Dianne Feinstein's accusation that the CIA has illegally spied on Congress has caused everyone from South Carolina's hawkish Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham to on-the-run whistle-blower Edward Snowden to weigh in. Feinstein, a Democrat, chairs the Senate Intelligence Committee. She claims there is evidence that the CIA conducted surveillance on committee staffers who were looking through classified documents related to the spy agency's interrogation and detention practices during the administration of President George W. Bush.
NATIONAL
March 12, 2014 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - This is not Robert Eatinger's first run through a full-blown CIA controversy. But it's his most public ordeal. For most of his career, few outside the world of espionage knew of Eatinger, 56, who has spent 22 years moving up the ranks to become the CIA's top lawyer. But in a scathing speech Tuesday, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the head of the Senate Intelligence Committee, accused him of trying to impede a Senate investigation into a notorious CIA detention and interrogation program that Eatinger had helped manage.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|