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Cia Officer

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NEWS
January 23, 2012 | By Ken Dilanian
A former CIA officer is facing decades in prison after being charged Monday with disclosing classified information to journalists, the latest in an unprecedented Obama administration crackdown against national security leaks. John Kiriakou, who made news in 2007 when he became one of the first CIA operatives to speak publicly about water boarding, is accused of providing secrets, including the name and activities of one his undercover colleagues, to reporters. One reporter is alleged to have turned over the name of the covert CIA officer to lawyers for Guantanamo Bay prisoners, who were seeking to identify CIA employees involved in coercive interrogations.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
August 21, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - The budget ax has fallen on a CIA office that focused on declassifying historical materials, a move scholars say will mean fewer public disclosures about long-buried intelligence secrets and scandals. The Historical Collections Division, which has declassified documents on top Soviet spies, a secret CIA airline in the Vietnam War, the Cuban missile crisis and other major operations, has been disbanded. The office that handles Freedom of Information Act requests will take over the work.
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NATIONAL
January 25, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - A former CIA officer was sentenced Friday to 30 months in federal prison for disclosing classified information to journalists in a case that underscored the Obama administration's harsh crackdown on national security leaks. John Kiriakou, a 14-year CIA veteran, pleaded guilty in October to identifying an undercover operative who was involved in the use of severe interrogation techniques, including waterboarding, on terrorism suspects during the George W. Bush administration.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2013 | By Lucy Kellaway
The prospect of a business book written by a former CIA officer fills one with dread at the inevitable 007 anecdotes and labored corporate parallels. But "Work Like a Spy: Business Tips From a Former CIA Officer," published by Portfolio, turns out to be rather different. There are no gadgets, few cloaks and fewer daggers: Instead it is a bracingly realistic book about people at work. It is short. It is sharp. Better still, it is sensible. It is also about spying, though only enough to lend a sprinkle of glamour and danger.
NATIONAL
October 24, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - A veteran former CIA officer pleaded guilty Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Alexandria, Va., to disclosing information identifying a covert agent. Under terms of a plea agreement with prosecutors, he is to be sentenced to 30 months in federal prison and ordered to pay a $250,000 fine. John C. Kiriakou, a CIA officer from 1990 to 2004, was arrested in January and charged in April with unmasking a 20-year covert agent to a Washington journalist who then shared that information with defense lawyers for terrorist detainees at the U.S. naval base on Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, authorities said.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
WASHINGTON - A former CIA officer was sentenced Friday to 30 months in federal prison for disclosing classified information to journalists in a case that underscored the Obama administration's harsh crackdown on national security leaks. John Kiriakou, a 14-year CIA veteran, pleaded guilty in October to identifying an undercover operative who was involved in the use of severe interrogation techniques, including waterboarding, on terrorism suspects during the George W. Bush administration.
NATIONAL
January 7, 2011 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
A former CIA officer was arrested Thursday on charges of illegally disclosing classified material and obstructing justice after authorities said he assisted a newspaper reporter and book author with information about highly classified covert operations. Jeffrey A. Sterling, who was terminated by the CIA after nearly nine years and who then sued alleging racial discrimination, was arrested in St. Louis after a federal grand jury indictment was unsealed in Alexandria, Va., charging him with 10 counts, including the "unlawful disclosure of national defense information.
NEWS
December 2, 2001 | Reuters
The body of slain CIA officer Johnny "Mike" Spann, who was killed during a prison uprising near the northern Afghan city of Mazar-i-Sharif, will arrive in the United States today, the CIA announced. Spann, killed Nov. 25, is the only known American combat death in the U.S. military campaign in Afghanistan. His remains will arrive at Andrews Air Force Base this afternoon, the CIA said. The agency said burial details have not been finalized.
OPINION
April 26, 2006
Re "CIA Officer Sacked for Leaking Detention-Site Secrets to Media," April 22 I wish I could nominate former CIA officer Mary O. McCarthy for the Nobel Peace Prize for informing the American press about this administration's secret, illegal torture chambers (call them what they are). McCarthy put this country's honor, integrity and the rule of law above her own personal concerns. I found the comments by "one U.S. official" particularly heinous: "When liaison countries agree to do things with us and we can't keep that secret, that is damaging.
NEWS
October 26, 1987 | Associated Press
Appointment of a CIA officer to a political science department teaching post at the University of California, Santa Barbara, was challenged by faculty organizations. A.E. Keir Nash, chairman of the university faculty's governing body, the Academic Senate, said Sunday that the hiring of George A. Chritton Jr., a senior-level officer for the Central Intelligence Agency, is being reconsidered because it was made without a vote by the political science department's faculty members.
NATIONAL
February 17, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Facing growing pressure to lift the veil of secrecy around targeted killings overseas, the Obama administration is considering shifting more of the CIA's covert drone program to the Pentagon, which operates under legal guidelines that could allow for more public disclosure in some cases. John Brennan, whom President Obama has nominated to run the CIA, favors moving the bulk of drone killing operations to the military, current and former U.S. officials say. As White House counter-terrorism advisor for the last four years, Brennan has overseen the steady increase in targeted killings of suspected militants and Al Qaeda operatives.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
WASHINGTON - A former CIA officer was sentenced Friday to 30 months in federal prison for disclosing classified information to journalists in a case that underscored the Obama administration's harsh crackdown on national security leaks. John Kiriakou, a 14-year CIA veteran, pleaded guilty in October to identifying an undercover operative who was involved in the use of severe interrogation techniques, including waterboarding, on terrorism suspects during the George W. Bush administration.
NATIONAL
January 25, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - A former CIA officer was sentenced Friday to 30 months in federal prison for disclosing classified information to journalists in a case that underscored the Obama administration's harsh crackdown on national security leaks. John Kiriakou, a 14-year CIA veteran, pleaded guilty in October to identifying an undercover operative who was involved in the use of severe interrogation techniques, including waterboarding, on terrorism suspects during the George W. Bush administration.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
PARK CITY, Utah -- Since opening in theaters last month, the Osama bin Laden manhunt film “Zero Dark Thirty” has intrigued audiences with its inside look at how CIA officers do their jobs. But the employees of the agency who tracked the Al Qaeda leader say that while they understand the need for dramatic license, the  Kathryn Bigelow film gets a number of details about their professional and personal lives wrong. “The individual hunches [are what] came through on 'Zero Dark,' and that's not exactly how it happens,” said Nada Bakos, who spent years as a CIA target officer, gathering intelligence that helped lead to the elimination of suspected terrorists.
NATIONAL
January 7, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
In June 2011, in a major speech on anti-terrorism efforts, John Brennan made the startling claim that there hadn't been a "single collateral death" in more than 100 covert U.S. drone strikes in Pakistan over a 12-month period. Yet just three months earlier, American missiles had rained down on what senior Pakistani officials said was a tribal council over a mining dispute in North Waziristan, killing as many as 45 men, most of whom the Pakistanis insist were neither members of the Taliban nor Al Qaeda.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Zero Dark Thirty" does focus on, as the ads insist, "the greatest manhunt in history," but once you've seen this film, a woman - or maybe two - will be on your mind. Following up on her Oscar-winning "The Hurt Locker," director Kathryn Bigelow proves herself once again to be a master of heightened realism and narrative drive in this retelling of the decade-long search for Osama bin Laden. The film's concluding section - a crisp re-creation of the Navy SEAL assault on the Pakistani compound where the wily mastermind lived and died - has been much-publicized, and the film's depiction of torture has already become a tempest in a teapot.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
President Bush, filling a key overseas post, has decided to nominate a former CIA officer as ambassador to China, sources said Wednesday. The choice is James R. Lilley, a career intelligence officer who served as CIA station chief in China when Bush headed the U.S. liaison office there in 1974-75.
NATIONAL
October 24, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - A veteran former CIA officer pleaded guilty Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Alexandria, Va., to disclosing information identifying a covert agent. Under terms of a plea agreement with prosecutors, he is to be sentenced to 30 months in federal prison and ordered to pay a $250,000 fine. John C. Kiriakou, a CIA officer from 1990 to 2004, was arrested in January and charged in April with unmasking a 20-year covert agent to a Washington journalist who then shared that information with defense lawyers for terrorist detainees at the U.S. naval base on Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, authorities said.
NATIONAL
October 23, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - A former U.S. intelligence officer with a long history at CIA headquarters and the agency's Counterterrorism Center pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Alexandria, Va., to a single count of disclosing information identifying a covert agent. He faces a 30-month federal prison sentence and $250,000 fine under a plea agreement with federal prosecutors. John C. Kiriakou, a CIA officer from 1990 to 2004, was charged in April with unmasking the 20-year covert agent to a Washington journalist who then shared that information with defense lawyers for terrorist detainees at the U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
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