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Cia Officer

OPINION
October 4, 2004
In the Sept. 30 editorial, "New 'Security' Target: the Press," you lay the blame in this episode on the Justice Department, which could not impartially investigate leaks by the White House, or on the Chicago prosecutor named to take on the task. This is not an investigation of the press, but an attempt to identify administration officials who may have sought to sway opinion by leaking the identity of a CIA officer to a conservative journalist in the expectation that he would go to print and undermine the views of a former ambassador who believed that a part of the evidence for war later presented by the secretary of State to the U.N. was false.
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NATIONAL
September 23, 2004 | Bob Drogin, Times Staff Writer
The Senate voted overwhelmingly Wednesday to approve Rep. Porter J. Goss (R-Fla.) as director of central intelligence, handing him a post with an uncertain future and the task of taking over America's battered spy services as they confront their worst crisis since the CIA was created after World War II.
NATIONAL
September 15, 2004 | Bob Drogin, Times Staff Writer
Under sharp questioning from Senate Democrats, Rep. Porter J. Goss (R-Fla.) pledged Tuesday to shed his partisan past and to embrace reform if he is named chief of America's beleagured intelligence community.
WORLD
June 26, 2004 | Ken Silverstein, Times Staff Writer
After nearly two decades on the sidelines, Duane "Dewey" Clarridge, the legendary CIA officer who played a key role in the Reagan administration's secret war in Nicaragua, is back in the game -- this time in Iraq and as a private citizen. Clarridge has launched his own self-financed investigation into alleged prewar financial dealings between Saddam Hussein's regime and France and Russia. And he has arranged to keep U.S. intelligence agencies briefed on what he uncovers.
WORLD
February 20, 2004 | Greg Miller and Bob Drogin, Times Staff Writers
Confronting problems on critical fronts, the CIA recently removed its top officer in Baghdad because of questions about his ability to lead the massive station there, and has closed a number of satellite bases in Afghanistan amid concerns about that country's deteriorating security situation, according to U.S. intelligence sources. The previously undisclosed moves underscore the problems affecting the agency's clandestine service at a time when it is confronting insurgencies and the U.S.
OPINION
October 3, 2003 | Philip Agee, Philip Agee, a CIA operations officer from 1957 to 1969, published "Inside the Company: CIA Diary" in 1975, in which he exposed hundreds of CIA operations and personnel in Latin America. He now runs an online travel services business based in Havana.
The current brouhaha over the outing of an undercover CIA officer brings to mind vivid memories and comic ironies. The 1982 law that now threatens Karl Rove, or whoever it was who leaked the officer's name, is the Intelligence Identities Protection Act -- and it was adopted to silence me. I was a CIA agent for 11 years in Latin America, but I quit in 1969 and wrote a book that told the true story of my life in the agency.
OPINION
October 2, 2003
Re "Bush Says Leak Probe Is Job for Justice Dept.," Oct. 1: It looks like the cover-ups and lies will continue, as long as President Bush and his cronies dodge an independent counsel investigation regarding the leak of the CIA officer's identity. I figure if an independent counsel was good enough to entrap President Clinton, then it is good enough to catch the real crooks and liars in the present administration. Allowing them to handle their own investigations is beyond absurd and, once again, they will find a scapegoat to shift the blame off Dubya, Vice President Dick Cheney, Karl Rove and the other unethical, pertinent players in this administration.
WORLD
February 7, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
CIA officer Helge Boes was killed and two others were injured when a grenade detonated prematurely during a training exercise in eastern Afghanistan, agency officials said. The injuries to the two officers were not believed to be life-threatening. Boes, 32, who lived in the Virginia suburbs of Washington, was an operations officer assigned to the CIA's Counterterrorism Center, the agency said.
OPINION
July 28, 2002 | DAVID WISE, David Wise is the author of "The Spy Who Got Away" and of "Spy: The Inside Story of How the FBI's Robert Hanssen Betrayed America," to be published in October.
In the gathering dusk of a cold, wet September day, we were sitting on the rear covered balcony of Edward Lee Howard's dacha near Moscow when he finally told me the truth, or some of it. I thought of that afternoon with a spy a decade ago when reports out of Moscow last week said that Howard had died of a broken neck in a fall in that dacha on July 12. I immediately thought of the steep staircase that led up to a small loft overlooking the spacious living...
NATIONAL
July 20, 2002 | MICHELLE MUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secrecy is its business, but the International Spy Museum opened very publicly Friday with news crews swarming the first day of the nation's only museum devoted to divulging the tricks of the Stasi, the KGB and the CIA. A placard in the museum quotes Winston Churchill: "In wartime, truth is so precious that she should always be attended by a bodyguard of lies." And spies, apparently, should be attended by a few cool gizmos to get the job done.
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