Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCia Officials
IN THE NEWS

Cia Officials

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
November 25, 2004 | From Associated Press
Two chiefs of overseas divisions at the CIA are leaving, a federal official said Wednesday night -- the latest changes at the spy agency that has been in turmoil since new Director Porter J. Goss took over. The chiefs of the Europe and Far East divisions -- two critical regions of the world for the spy agency -- are retiring, an official told the Associated Press on condition of anonymity. Their names were not released because they work undercover.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
February 12, 2014 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON -- An effort by a powerful U.S. senator to broaden congressional oversight of lethal drone strikes overseas fell apart last week after the White House refused to expand the number of lawmakers briefed on covert CIA operations, according to senior U.S. officials. Sen. Carl Levin (D-Mich.), who chairs the Armed Services Committee, held a joint classified hearing Thursday with the Senate Intelligence Committee on CIA and military drone strikes against suspected terrorists.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 19, 1994 | WALTER PINCUS, THE WASHINGTON POST
The CIA inspector general has identified more than a dozen active or retired officials who either ignored warnings or overlooked complaints against onetime counterintelligence officer Aldrich H. Ames during the nine years he spied for Moscow, according to sources familiar with the report. Chiefs, deputies and operating personnel in the Office of Security reportedly come under fire in a 400-page report for their failure to follow up on information about Ames' lavish spending in 1990.
OPINION
May 2, 2013 | By Sarah Chayes
In a time when the whetted and arbitrary deficit-reduction knife is cutting bone out of critical U.S. government programs, the image of shopping bags stuffed with CIA cash handed off on a monthly basis to Afghan President Hamid Karzai - who reigns over one of the most corrupt governments on the planet - has outraged many Americans. The New York Times, which revealed the years of payoffs this week, noted that "there is little evidence the payments bought the influence the CIA sought.
NEWS
May 30, 1987 | KAREN TUMULTY and SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writers
The CIA's former Costa Rica station chief, portrayed by the agency as a "renegade" for his efforts to help Nicaragua's contra rebels after Congress had banned government aid, testified Friday in a closed session with congressional investigating committees that he kept CIA officials informed of his activities, committee members said. "I gather that people in the agency were notified," said Rep. Henry J. Hyde (R-Ill.), a member of the House committee. Marine Lt. Col. Oliver L.
NEWS
January 16, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS and MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writers
The CIA recalled its chief officer in Costa Rica last week for aiding the private airlift of weapons to Nicaraguan rebels during a ban on U.S. military aid to the contras, Administration and congressional sources said Thursday. The intelligence agency told the Senate Intelligence Committee this week that it recalled its station chief from the U.S.
NEWS
January 22, 1987 | Associated Press
A CIA station chief recalled from Costa Rica for aiding a Nicaraguan rebel arms resupply mission has been cleared of wrongdoing by two internal investigations that did not examine broader questions of CIA involvement, intelligence sources say. Despite the legal findings, CIA superiors feel the station chief, known by the pseudonym Tomas Castillo, exercised poor judgment in relaying the messages from then-White House aide Oliver L. North, said the sources, who spoke on condition of anonymity.
NATIONAL
November 16, 2004 | Greg Miller, Times Staff Writer
The resignations of two more senior CIA officials Monday fueled debate in the intelligence community over whether the agency was tumbling into turmoil under new Director Porter J. Goss, or was taking painful but necessary steps toward fixing serious problems. In the latest in a series of high-profile departures, the top two officials in the CIA's clandestine service quit after clashing with one of Goss' senior aides. Stephen R.
NEWS
October 13, 1990 | From The Washington Post
Independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh said Friday he will drop attempts to prosecute former CIA operative Joseph F. Fernandez after Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh announced that he will continue to refuse to permit classified CIA information sought by the defense to be used in the trial.
NATIONAL
December 20, 2007 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
The chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, chafing at the Justice Department's handling of a probe into missing CIA interrogation tapes, threatened Wednesday to subpoena two top CIA officials to jump-start the panel's own investigation. The department, which is conducting a criminal inquiry with the CIA inspector general into revelations that a CIA official destroyed videotapes of two terrorism suspects being interrogated in 2005, asked the panel last week to defer its inquiry.
OPINION
February 2, 2013
Re "Former CIA officer sentenced in leak case," Jan. 26 The Justice Department will not prosecute CIA officials who approved or conducted "enhanced interrogations," and yet it goes after the man who blew the whistle on these practices. I suppose it is too much to hope that Obama will commute the sentence of John Kiriakou, as President George W. Bush did for I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby. Jean Koch Los Angeles ALSO: Letters: Researching marijuana Letters: Women deserve a fighting chance Letters: Who should pay for illegal immigration?
NATIONAL
January 7, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Nearly a decade after the last Al Qaeda detainee was waterboarded, Americans still know little about what the CIA did to its prisoners, or whether it worked. President Obama decided against an investigation to hold accountable George W. Bush administration and CIA officials who conceived and carried out what he and others believed were acts of torture. And a criminal investigation ended last year with no charges and no public report. But now, a Hollywood movie has put renewed pressure on CIA officials to reveal whether simulated drowning and other harsh techniques elicited valuable intelligence, as the agency has long contended.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian and Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - After complaining for weeks that the movie “Zero Dark Thirty” erroneously implies that torture yielded key information in the hunt for Osama bin Laden, a trio of senior senators now want to know whether CIA personnel deliberately misled the filmmakers on that point. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee, along with Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Sen. Carl Levin (D-Mich.), said Thursday that they had sent two letters to acting CIA chief Michael Morell.
NATIONAL
November 9, 2012 | By Ken Dilanian and David S. Cloud, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - CIA Director David H. Petraeus abruptly resigned Friday after a brief but troubled tenure as head of America's clandestine spy service, citing his "extremely poor judgment" for engaging in an extramarital affair that the FBI had uncovered in an unrelated investigation. The scandal threw the CIA into turmoil three days after the presidential election and caused consternation at the White House, which had assumed the widely respected former war commander in Iraq and Afghanistan would keep his national security position in the second Obama administration.
NEWS
June 13, 2012 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - Disputing allegations by some Republican lawmakers, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta denied Wednesday that any classified information or material was given to the Hollywood producers of a planned film about the Navy SEAL raid that killed Osama bin Laden in Pakistan last year. Panetta, who previously headed the CIA, told the defense subcommittee of the Senate Appropriations Committee that director Kathryn Bigelow and screenwriter Mark Boal were given the same kind of access as other Americans who seek help from the Pentagon.
WORLD
May 1, 2012 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Mistakes were made, but on balance waterboarding of terrorism suspects made the world safer. That is the conclusion of Jose Rodriguez, a key CIA architect of the harsh measures used to elicit intelligence from prisoners snatched from the streets of foreign countries and flown to a globe-spanning network of secret prisons for interrogation. But in Europe, where leaders of developing democracies like Poland, Lithuania and Romania allowed the CIA to conduct counter-terrorism activities the Council of Europe defines as torture, Rodriguez's position is unlikely to dampen the quest for accountability for those who welcomed U.S. agents.
NEWS
November 26, 1987 | MICHAEL WINES and DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writers
The Central Intelligence Agency's top covert operations official and its inspector general--both casualties of damaging revelations in the Iran-Contra scandal--are resigning, apparently beginning a long-anticipated housecleaning, sources said Wednesday. Deputy Director for Operations Clair George, a 32-year agency veteran who served undercover in Africa, Lebanon and Europe, announced his resignation at a senior CIA staff meeting Wednesday morning, sources said.
NEWS
November 29, 1985 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
Accused spy Larry Wu-tai Chin, far from being merely a low-level translator for the CIA, had access to virtually every top-secret U.S. intelligence report on Asia for at least two decades and is thought to have funneled most of them to the Chinese government, senior U.S. intelligence officials said Thursday.
NEWS
May 2, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
The operation that killed Osama bin Laden was led by the CIA, although most of those conducting the raid were military special operations troops, a U.S. official said today. CIA Director Leon Panetta gave the go-order about midday Sunday, after President Obama had signed off on it. Panetta and other CIA officials monitored the raid via live video on the 7th floor of CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia. When an operator was overheard confirming that bin Laden was killed, cheers erupted.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2010 | By Ken Dilanian
When CIA Director Leon Panetta gathered reporters recently to discuss mistakes that allowed a suicide bomber to kill seven personnel in Afghanistan, he didn't mention a separate disclosure the agency made that day: that it had sued a retired officer who wrote an unapproved memoir. To some CIA veterans, the developments are related in ways that do not reflect well on the agency. An internal investigation blamed the December attack by an Al Qaeda double agent on "systemic failures" in CIA training, management, information sharing and vetting of sources.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|