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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2004 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
John Irving's novel "The Cider House Rules" was converted into a two-part stage epic in Seattle in 1997. The Mark Taper Forum presented a somewhat trimmed but still double-barreled version a year later. Yet after the material was transformed into a well-received, standard-length movie in 1999, the chances of again seeing Peter Parnell's ambitious stage adaptation -- which runs nearly six hours -- seemed slim.
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FOOD
December 31, 2003 | Valli Herman, Times Staff Writer
It's easy to assume that there's been a mix-up at the bar when your cocktail arrives in a teapot. But when you order the hot sake cider at G. Garvin's 3rd Street restaurant, the warm, fragrant drink is all the more charming presented on a white ceramic tray with a matching miniature teapot, two demitasse cups and a pretty garnish of sliced apple. The cider (which is not actually cider) is slightly sweet, potent and perplexing. Is that a hint of plum along with the ginger and nutmeg?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2000 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Apart from best picture recognition for "American Beauty" and "The Insider," surprises were about the only things that seemed inevitable in this year's wide-open Oscar race, and the nominations announced Tuesday didn't disappoint on that account. Perhaps the biggest shock was the strong showing (seven nominations) of "The Cider House Rules," which came on like a minor league player who hits a grand slam his first time at bat in the majors.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2000 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the ads showing cherubic children holding hands and a flirty blond riding piggyback on a young boy, it might appear that the film "The Cider House Rules" is just a sweet-natured, coming-of-age story set in the 1940s. It is a coming-of-age story--but that's only a part of it. The movie actually deals head-on with incendiary subjects like abortion and incest. Some audience members have come out of the movie theater saying they were unprepared for what they saw.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1999 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I used to do films where I got the girl," said Michael Caine with a roguish chuckle. "Now I just get the part." He's not complaining.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Cider House Rules," Lasse Hallstrom's superb film adaptation of the acclaimed John Irving novel of the same name, takes its title from a short, typed list posted on the wall of an old building on a New England apple farm. The barn-like structure serves as a dormitory for migrant workers, and the list is composed of simple requests, such as not climbing on the roof of the Cider House to take a sun bath.
FOOD
August 25, 1999 | CHARLES PERRY
In on-sale liquor retailing news, Ace Cider has opened the first cidery (cider bar) in the U.S. The Ace in the Hole is located at the Ace cider mill near Sebastopol--in Sonoma County, better known as wine country. In addition to the usual apple and pear hard ciders, it will serve specialty ciders including a mango cider and the traditional Devonshire unfiltered cider called scrumpy. Cider drinkers are evidently not late groovers, because this is a bar that opens at 10:30 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1999 | DON SHIRLEY, Don Shirley is The Times' theater writer
Angelenos who ignore local theater and then brag about all the shows they've seen in New York should pay attention: If you passed up the "The Cider House Rules" marathon when the show's two parts played the Mark Taper Forum on a rotating schedule last summer, chances are you won't be able to see the whole production in New York after all.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1998 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Cider House Rules," the epic, two-part stage adaptation of John Irving's 1985 novel, ruled the 1998 Theatre LA Ovation Awards nominees, which were announced Monday. It took 13 nominations, including best play at a larger theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1998 | Sean Mitchell, Sean Mitchell is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Movies are made from books all the time and no one thinks twice about it, but lately putting a novel on the stage seems somehow more unwieldy and unnatural, a great stunt if you can pull it off, as the Royal Shakespeare Company did with Dickens' "Nicholas Nickleby" back in the early '80s.
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