Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCinco De Mayo
IN THE NEWS

Cinco De Mayo

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1998 | KARLA PEREZ-VILLALTA
For a boastful French commander who invaded Puebla, Mexico, in 1862, Cinco de Mayo meant an unexpected trouncing by Mexican troops. But for a handful of Valley communities, the day means good food, fine music and a lot of family fun. Celebrations will include: * St. Finbar Catholic Church and School will host a fiesta from 6 to 10 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday at 2120 Olive Ave., Burbank. Information: (818) 846-6251.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1998
More than 300,000 people are expected to attend what is billed as the largest Cinco de Mayo celebration in the nation, being held today in downtown Los Angeles. The ninth annual AT&T Fiesta Broadway will feature recording artist and film performer Chayanne, Banda Arkangel R-15 and more than 40 other acts, including mariachis, ballet folkloricos and ranchero bands, performing on six concert stages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2000 | AGUSTIN GURZA
Well, it's that time of year again. I've got them over-hyped, beer-guzzling, hot-and-dusty Cinco de Mayo Blues. Some people get depressed at Christmas. I get in a funk over a Mexican holiday I never even heard of until I was in college. I ask you: How can a holiday have magic or meaning without childhood memories? I remember Thanksgiving feasts, egg hunts on Easter Sunday, paper shamrocks on St. Patrick's Day and family barbecues on the Fourth of July.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2000 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One could make a satisfying afternoon out of music by Mexican composers, but the Young Musicians Foundation Debut Orchestra took a more generalized approach in its Cinco de Mayo celebration at the Wilshire-Ebell Theatre. Most of Sunday afternoon's program revolved around a hodgepodge of pieces that incorporated, in jazzman Jelly Roll Morton's words, the "Spanish tinge"--which made for a colorful menu, if not exactly a genuine Cinco de Mayo feast.
NEWS
April 30, 1992 | GREG HERNANDEZ, Greg Hernandez is a free-lance writer who regularly contributes to The Times Orange County Edition.
Tickets are now on sale for San Clemente's annual outdoor Cinco de Mayo Fiesta, which will be held Saturday at the city's Community Center. The event, which runs from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., will feature an array of activities including games, an arts and crafts exhibit, a low-rider car show and sporting demonstrations in karate, wrestling and gymnastics. Children in attendance will also have the opportunity each hour to break several large pinatas filled with candy and toys.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1996 | DAVID E. BRADY
"Viva Mexico!" went the cry from an outdoor stage at Cal State Northridge on Thursday. "Viva!" came the enthusiastic reply from a few hundred students scattered across the University Student Union for CSUN's first Cinco de Mayo festival. The hearty sound was coming not from a fiery student but from a 7-year-old girl. On stage, singer Tatiana Bolanos danced, gestured and sang with all the fury of a veteran performer as she closed out a three-song set.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1997 | KARIMA A. HAYNES
Strains of ancient Indian music filled the air as Montezuma, the last Aztec emperor of Mexico, emerged from behind stone sculptures adorning the outdoor Plaza of Mexican Heritage at Forest Lawn-Memorial Park. Montezuma--dressed in a flowing gold lame cape, feathered headdress and beaded breastplate, loincloth and boots--strode to the edge of the plaza and introduced himself to 200 students from Valley Alternative Magnet School in Van Nuys. "I am Mexico's last great emperor! Montezuma!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1997 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came, thousands of them, to taste and celebrate a bit of 19th century Mexican history that reverberates today. On Olvera Street in downtown L.A., people jammed the narrow passageways between the shops, eyeing gifts, sampling delicacies and moving to the rhythm of mariachi music. Sunday marked the finale of weekend celebrations for Cinco de Mayo--a day that represents the 1862 victory of the Mexican army against the better armed French.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1988 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
An attempt by a prominent black community group to reach out to Latinos by staging a Cinco de Mayo celebration has backfired, leading to public charges by a Latino group of racial insensitivity, and increased tension between black and Latino county employees.
NEWS
May 5, 1991 | CHARISSE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first Cinco de Mayo festival to be held in the community they share, Latinos and African-Americans came together on the streets of Watts Saturday to celebrate each other's culture and Mexico's long-ago victory over the French. Three children--two Latino and one black--held the banner that proclaimed the Cinco de Mayo Watts Parade, and they led marching bands, dancers and carloads of local politicians and celebrities through the heart of Watts as an estimated 10,000 people cheered them on.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|