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June 2, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Time Warner Inc. began selling films including "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire" and TV shows such as "The Dukes of Hazzard" over the Internet using download service CinemaNow Inc. Beginning with "Firewall" on Tuesday, the company's Warner Bros. studio also will make films available on CinemaNow the same day they are released on DVD, Marina del Rey-based CinemaNow said.
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BUSINESS
June 2, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Time Warner Inc. began selling films including "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire" and TV shows such as "The Dukes of Hazzard" over the Internet using download service CinemaNow Inc. Beginning with "Firewall" on Tuesday, the company's Warner Bros. studio also will make films available on CinemaNow the same day they are released on DVD, Marina del Rey-based CinemaNow said.
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BUSINESS
May 31, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Disney films such as "Glory Road" and the animated "Chicken Little" will soon be available to own via computer download from the Internet-based movie distributor CinemaNow Inc. The companies were expected to announce today that CinemaNow will sell the films for $19.95 and allow customers to transfer the downloaded content to portable devices that use Microsoft Corp.'s Windows Media software. In a deal similar to others announced in April, Walt Disney Co.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Disney films such as "Glory Road" and the animated "Chicken Little" will soon be available to own via computer download from the Internet-based movie distributor CinemaNow Inc. The companies were expected to announce today that CinemaNow will sell the films for $19.95 and allow customers to transfer the downloaded content to portable devices that use Microsoft Corp.'s Windows Media software. In a deal similar to others announced in April, Walt Disney Co.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2003 | Jon Healey
Broadening its efforts to attract viewers on the Internet, MGM Home Entertainment, a subsidiary of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc., has agreed to license its movies to CinemaNow Inc., an online movie distributor in Marina del Rey. The two firms are expected to announce the deal today. It would give privately held CinemaNow access to MGM's films for streaming or downloading as soon as they are released to pay-per-view services on cable and satellite TV.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2003 | Jon Healey
News Corp. subsidiary 20th Century Fox plans to make its movies available online for the first time, offering downloadable versions of selected titles through Marina del Rey-based CinemaNow Inc. Financial terms of the deal, which is expected to be announced today, were not disclosed. Fox announced an Internet movie joint venture in 2001 with Walt Disney Co., but that project was shelved last year because of antitrust concerns before it got off the ground.
BUSINESS
January 3, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Online movie download site CinemaNow Inc. has struck a deal with software maker Macrovision Corp. aimed at making it easier for manufacturers of media players and other devices to make their products compatible with CinemaNow's on-demand movie service. CinemaNow, based in Marina del Rey, has been pushing to make its movie service available beyond users' computers, with the goal of enabling users to easily transfer movie downloads for viewing on TV sets.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2007 | Dawn C. Chmielewski and Abigail Goldman, Times Staff Writers
Wal-Mart Stores Inc. today begins selling films online as the leading seller of DVDs stakes a claim in the emerging market of movie downloading. The store, at www.walmart.com/videodownloads, makes Wal-Mart the first major retailer to offer downloadable digital movies from all the major Hollywood studios. The online DVD market is crowded with competitors, including Apple Inc.'s iTunes store, online retailer Amazon.com Inc.'
BUSINESS
November 29, 2006 | Dawn C. Chmielewski, Times Staff Writer
Onetime file-swapping pariah BitTorrent Inc. is expected to announce deals today with 20th Century Fox, Paramount Pictures and MTV Networks to deliver popular movies and television shows as it tries to reshape itself into a legitimate distribution outlet. San Francisco-based BitTorrent plans to harness the same technology used by millions of people to illicitly trade copyrighted movies and television shows to create a marketplace for downloading all forms of licensed entertainment content.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2007 | Dawn C. Chmielewski, Times Staff Writer
Amazon.com Inc. and TiVo Inc. are trying to bridge the gap between the PC and television. The two companies plan today to announce an alliance that will enable some TiVo Inc. customers to use their TVs to watch movies and television shows purchased through Amazon's nascent online video store, Unbox. The service addresses one of the greatest impediments to the growth of Internet video -- viewers can't watch it on their living room TVs.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2003 | Jon Healey
Broadening its efforts to attract viewers on the Internet, MGM Home Entertainment, a subsidiary of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc., has agreed to license its movies to CinemaNow Inc., an online movie distributor in Marina del Rey. The two firms are expected to announce the deal today. It would give privately held CinemaNow access to MGM's films for streaming or downloading as soon as they are released to pay-per-view services on cable and satellite TV.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2007 | Dawn C. Chmielewski, Times Staff Writer
A long-anticipated technology that will let consumers burn downloaded movies to DVDs is expected to be announced today, representing a potential milestone in the development of online movie services. Sonic Solutions Inc. of Novato, Calif., said it had won approval for its technology, which makes it possible for people to record homemade DVDs containing the same copy protection found on professionally made DVDs. The approval came after protracted negotiations with the DVD Copy Control Assn.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2006 | Chris Gaither, Times staff writer
Amazon.com Inc. on Thursday started selling downloadable movies and TV shows, hoping to introduce online movie watching to the masses the way it did online shopping. Amazon Unbox features thousands of movies -- current releases and classics -- from suppliers that include six major Hollywood studios. The online store's selection of TV shows comes from such networks as CBS, Fox, A&E and MTV. The films, including "V for Vendetta" and "Ben Hur," generally cost $7.99 to $14.99.
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