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Cinematographer

ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
When Gore Verbinski was directing his upcoming movie, "Rango," a spaghetti western-like tale set in a desert town overrun by bandits, he did what he typically does: have his principal actors, led by Johnny Depp and fellow cast members that include Harry Dean Stanton, Abigail Breslin and Ray Winstone, act out key scenes. The actors wore western costumes ? Depp sported a giant cowboy hat and bandana and Winstone packed a sidearm. They had the usual array of props, including whiskey glasses and sawhorses, on a stage at Universal that also featured a saloon with a 40-foot-long wooden bar and the requisite swinging doors and even a chuckwagon.
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NEWS
December 9, 2010 | By Robert Abele, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Usually, two names under a screen credit for cinematography means either the first person was fired or (gulp) died. But for "127 Hours," about real-life mountain climber Aron Ralston's grueling experience trapped in a Utah canyon, director Danny Boyle deliberately sought to use two cinematographers simultaneously: his Oscar-winning "Slumdog Millionaire" cameraman Anthony Dod Mantle and Enrique Chediak, who shot Boyle's "28 Weeks Later. " If one man was filming star James Franco, the other would be shooting a flashback scene or landscape shot, and vice versa.
NEWS
December 7, 2010
For Lights, Camera ? we ask a craftsperson to talk about a specific scene in his or her latest film. This week, cinematographer Danny Cohen writes about creating tension in "The King's Speech" and the tricky lighting issues of filming in a recording booth. In the climax of "The King's Speech," Colin Firth comes within 2 inches of a microphone to deliver a speech announcing the outbreak of war. Public speaking is something the monarch he plays has always dreaded due to a paralyzing speech impediment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
N. Paul Kenworthy Jr., a camera-systems inventor and cinematographer whose captivating wildlife footage was featured in Walt Disney's Academy Award-winning True-Life Adventure films "The Living Desert" and "The Vanishing Prairie," has died. He was 85. Kenworthy, who co-invented the Snorkel Camera System, died of thyroid cancer Oct. 15 at a senior living facility in Ventura, said his son Kirk. The cancer had spread to his lungs. A World War II veteran, Kenworthy earned a postwar master's degree in cinematography at UCLA, shooting a documentary on desert wildlife that centered on the battle between a pepsis wasp and a tarantula.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2010 | Richard Verrier
William A. "Bill" Fraker, a cinematographer who was nominated for six Academy Awards including for "Looking for Mr. Goodbar," "Heaven Can Wait" and "1941," died Monday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. He was 86 and had cancer. Fraker, a larger-than-life figure, was one of America's most respected cinematographers, known as much for the enduring images he crafted on classic movies like "Rosemary's Baby" and "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" as for his efforts to mentor young camera operators.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2010
Cinematography "Avatar" Mauro Fiore In tribute to the film's groundbreaking visuals -- a combination of live-action and computer-generated images -- the award for cinematography went to Mauro Fiore for his work on director James Cameron's "Avatar." The film was shot using high-definition digital cameras and a system for creating 3-D effects invented specifically for the film. "I want to thank the academy for this unbelievable honor," said the 45-year-old Italian-born Fiore, who received his first Oscar nomination for "Avatar."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2010 | By Susan King
Christian Berger won the top feature film honor for "The White Ribbon" Saturday evening at the 24th Annual American Society of Cinematographers Outstanding Achievement Awards. The German film, which is Oscar-nominated for best cinematography and foreign language film, was the only black-and-white film among the five nominees. The last time the ASC gave its feature film award to a black-and-white production was eight years ago for Roger Deakins for "The Man Who Wasn't There." The ASC winners were announced Saturday during a gala at the Hyatt Regency Century Place Hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2010 | By Susan King
The nominees in the feature film category of the 24th annual American Society of Cinematographers Outstanding Achievement Awards announced Monday have a distinctly international flavor. The lone American -- Robert Richardson for "Inglourious Basterds" -- is joined by Briton Barry Ackroyd, who is nominated for "The Hurt Locker"; Aussie Dion Beebe, for "Nine"; Mauro Fiore of Italy, for "Avatar"; and Austrian Christian Berger for "The White Ribbon," the only black-and-white film in the group.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2010
ASC taps five cameramen The American Society of Cinematographers' list of nominees for outstanding achievement in a feature film for 2009 has a distinctly international flavor. Only one American was among the five cinematographers named Monday: Robert Richardson, for "Inglourious Basterds." He was joined by Briton Barry Ackroyd, for "The Hurt Locker"; Aussie Dion Beebe, for "Nine"; Mauro Fiore, of Italy, for "Avatar"; and Austrian Christian Berger for "The White Ribbon," the only black-and-white film in the group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan
Joseph M. Wilcots, a trailblazing African American cinematographer whose credits include the landmark 1970s TV miniseries "Roots" and "Roots: The Next Generations," has died. He was 70. Wilcots died Dec. 30 at Antelope Valley Hospital in Lancaster of complications from a stroke he suffered in 2008, said his manager, Phyllis Larrymore Kelly. The first African American to join the International Cinematographers Guild -- in 1967 -- Wilcots initially worked on camera crews for TV series such as "The F.B.I."
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