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Circumnavigation

TRAVEL
January 10, 1999 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arctic birds, Japanese snow monkeys and a solar eclipse--this could be an interesting year for you, if you take the right tour. For the sixth year, we've asked Ann Waigand, editor of the Educated Traveler newsletter, for a list of the 10 "thinking tours" that she finds most intriguing, of which many are sponsored by museums. Waigand's top 10 for 1999 follow, in calendar order. Note that prices are per person, based on double occupancy. Travelers should be sure they understand which meals and excursions are included (and excluded)
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BUSINESS
January 9, 2004 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
With laser-light glitz typically reserved for rock concerts, maverick British billionaire Richard Branson unveiled his latest big venture here Thursday: a Star Trek-like aircraft that will attempt to fly nonstop around the world in 80 hours. The GlobalFlyer, resembling a flying catamaran and powered by a single jet engine, will attempt to break what Branson called the "last great aviation record left here on Earth," as it circumnavigates the globe with a single pilot and a single load of fuel.
SPORTS
January 17, 1996 | RICH ROBERTS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By today, Steve Fossett planned to be high over India drifting toward China, halfway around the world in the first nonstop circumnavigation by balloon. Instead, he is back home in Colorado reflecting on his two days of troubled flight, down to earth and happy to be alive. At dawn nine days ago, Solo Challenger, Fossett's 200-foot-tall hot air and helium balloon, was a magnificent sight as it rose silently out of the Strato Bowl, a natural crater near Rapid City, S.D.
NEWS
March 21, 1999 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Balloonists Bertrand Piccard and Brian Jones in their shimmering silver Breitling Orbiter 3 descended safely today in a remote Egyptian oasis, completing the dream of becoming the first balloonists ever to circle the globe and accomplishing the longest nonstop flight ever without refueling. Their 9-ton, helium-and-hot-air craft, nearly as tall as a 20-story building, achieved the goal of circumnavigation that had eluded balloonists in at least 17 attempts since 1981.
NEWS
May 13, 2002 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
How many of you working stiffs, like me, stay freeze-dried to your office seats each day while dreaming of the Great Escape? You know, handing back the 9-to-5 job, thank you, selling the house, cashing in the 401(k) and risking that grand global adventure? If you're weak-willed like me (my wife would say--aaaack!--responsible), you submerge your wanderlust by reading travelogues and adventure novels while slouching off each summer on a three-week, over-in-a-heartbeat international vacation.
NEWS
February 1, 1988 | PAUL DEAN, Times Staff Writer
It was one small step for aviation, one giant stride for charity. "Although I must say this flight is a little more comfortable than that flight," smiled Neil Armstrong, first man on the moon, now a director of United Airlines. He is shirt-sleeved and sipping a Chateau Lalande-Borie in the controlled climate of a first-class cabin aboard one of his company's 747s west of the Azores and pointing at Lisbon. "Also, the service on Apollo 11 was pretty ratty."
NEWS
July 23, 1989 | JIM CARLTON and RICHARD BEENE, Times Staff Writers
Eleven-year-old Tony Aliengena landed his plane at John Wayne Airport on Saturday, after a sometimes treacherous 21,567-mile odyssey which made him the youngest pilot to circumnavigate the globe. The fourth-grader from San Juan Capistrano performed a low fly-by for a welcoming crowd of about 100, then bought the borrowed Cessna 210 Centurion to a landing by a red carpet on the airstrip where he and his family departed June 5. Tony's 2:28 p.m.
NEWS
July 20, 1989 | ERIC BAILEY and JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writers
With the spotlight focused squarely on his son's efforts to circumnavigate the globe, Gary Aliengena has remained largely in the background during the "Friendship Flight" of the boy aviator, 11-year-old Tony Aliengena. Until now. The crash of the expedition's plane during takeoff Tuesday evening from a remote Alaskan airstrip with the elder Aliengena at the controls has suddenly thrust the 39-year-old real estate investor onto center stage.
NEWS
January 10, 1998 | From Associated Press
Two balloonists parachuted into a cactus-studded pasture Friday after a tear doomed their round-the-world quest just an hour after launch. The pilotless balloon, laden with explosive fuel, floated east for about eight hours before landing in Texas. Dick Rutan and Dave Melton, hoping to become the first to fly nonstop round the world in a balloon, parachuted in 45-mph winds Friday morning. They landed a quarter-mile apart about 13 miles southeast of the town of Vaughn, N.M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Still on a roll after nearly three years and 15,000 miles, Fabrice Gropaiz coasted to a stop Thursday on the Santa Monica Pier to end a trip around the world on in-line skates. The 28-year-old Frenchman, who undertook the unique journey to raise money for AIDS research, chronicled his trip for thousands of readers by filing periodic updates and photographs on the Internet.
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