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NEWS
May 16, 2001
Re "Retailers See Gold in Poor Areas," May 12: This article proves the readiness of inner-city shoppers. Now, bring the stores that will have the most impact on lives: Bring bookstores to the inner city. Bring the biggest and best bookstores. Bring Borders, Barnes & Noble, Brentano's, Bookstar and any others that truly believe in the power of their product. They will thrive in this vital, untapped market. And as inner-city neighborhoods become print-rich environments, remarkably, test scores will rise in "failing" inner-city schools.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By David Zahniser and James Rainey
Three months after it painted L.A. as a metropolis stumbling into decline, the Los Angeles 2020 Commission offered 13 recommendations Wednesday that it said would attract jobs and "put the city on a path to fiscal stability. " The group of prominent business, labor and civic leaders called on elected officials to enact a wide-ranging series of policy initiatives: increasing the minimum wage, combining giant twin harbors into a single port, altering oversight of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and bolstering efforts to promote regional tourism.
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SPORTS
April 18, 1989
Six cities have made official bids for the 26th Summer Olympic Games in 1996, the International Olympic Committee said. Bids received from national Olympic organizations by the April 15 deadline were for Atlanta; Athens; Belgrade, Yugoslavia; Manchester, England; Melbourne, Australia, and Toronto. The IOC said that the host city will be chosen at a meeting of all members in Tokyo in September of 1990.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Anh Do
When a city councilman in Irvine dreamed up the idea of forming a relationship with a coastal town in Vietnam, the leaders of this increasingly multicultural community got a quick, decisive lesson in foreign relations. Hundreds of Vietnamese Americans, many with wrenching stories of fleeing their homeland as communist forces took over the country, arrived by the busload at City Hall to tell city leaders they felt insulted and betrayed. By the time Tuesday's council meeting ended six hours later, city officials not only had dropped plans for a "friendship" pact with Nha Trang, they also had voted 3 to 2 to suspend Irvine's entire Friendship Cities Program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1998 | AGNES DIGGS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you drove down the center of Hurstview Avenue heading east, you would be in the city of Monrovia. But your passenger would be in Duarte. Or hop on South Myrtle Avenue in Monrovia. As you cross Altern Street, you are under county jurisdiction for about half a mile. Pass Wayland Way and you return to Monrovia, but only for about 350 feet. Then it's back to the county again--for another three-eighths of a mile.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles is at a disadvantage competing with Las Vegas, New York and Miami for tourists who want a lively nightclub scene because of a California law that cuts off alcohol sales at 2 a.m., a state lawmaker contends. State Sen. Mark Leno (D-San Francisco) has introduced legislation that could extend the last call for alcohol in some California cities until 4 a.m. "This legislation would allow destination cities like San Francisco, Los Angeles and San Diego to start local conversations about the possibility of expanding night life and the benefits it could provide the community by boosting jobs, tourism and local tax revenue," Leno said.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
A couple of recent news articles about local approaches to housing issues offer a pretty stark contrast in smart policy and, well, not-so-smart policy. In the smart category, cities such as Washington and Philadelphia have long struggled with trying to strike an economic balance in reviving high-poverty, high-crime neighborhoods. The usual progression is that a battered area attracts some adventurous and dedicated residents who buy property and work hard to improve their new neighborhoods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1998
From caves to castles to condominiums, people have lived in a variety of communities. Today's concerns about cities are the same as thousands of years ago, such as the need for a good water supply and an effective transportation system. Explore types of architecture, find out what planning goes into building a city and try creating one of your own through the direct links on the Times Launch Point Web site: http://www.latimes.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
In the wake of the Great Recession, rich and poor households are separated by stark geographical divides. Most of the country's rich live in cities, while households below the poverty line are concentrated in the countryside and in some inner-city enclaves, according to an analysis by the Institute for Spatial Economic Analysis at the University of Redlands. The middle class creates buffer zones between the two. A map of income distrubution shows a sea of pink in rural America and the South, representing the bottom 25% of earners, while bright orange, representing the 10% of the highest earners, dots the Eastern Seaboard and coast of California.
NATIONAL
June 28, 2012 | By Don Lee, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Since the advent of the automobile in the 1920s, America's suburbs have been growing faster than cities as people fled urban life for quieter, less-crowded expanses. But new Census Bureau data indicate that, in general, cities last year grew faster than suburbs, reflecting an urban renaissance accelerated by the Great Recession. For all 51 metro areas with a million or more people, cities as a whole grew by 1.1% from 2010 to 2011, while suburbs increased 0.9%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Kate Mather and Ruben Vives
The long-running Bell corruption scandal drew toward an end Wednesday when five former council members pleaded no contest to criminal charges and agreed to pay restitution to the small, cash-strapped city that could approach $1 million. The pleas end the prosecution of seven officials accused of bilking the city out of more than $10 million that they used for excessive salaries and perks. At one point, council members were receiving up to $100,000 a year for their part-time work, while the city's top administrator, Robert Rizzo, pulled in $1.5 million annually in total compensation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By David Zahniser and Emily Alpert Reyes
High-level Los Angeles officials were scrambling Wednesday after the City Council approved an ordinance that could have inadvertently boosted the pay of its top executives - a move portrayed by Council President Herb Wesson as "a mistake. " The council voted unanimously for a two-year salary plan covering non-union employees. A document prepared for the council suggested that there would be three increases over the next 15 months - 2.75% in June, 2.75% in December and 2.75% in June 2015 - for about three dozen department heads, including top executives at the police, planning, parks, library and transportation departments.
SPORTS
April 9, 2014 | By Ben Bolch
The word on Blake Griffin has changed. All he does is debunk. Lest anyone is still clinging to the ridiculous belief that he is just a dunking marvel, the Clippers forward offered another retort Wednesday night at Staples Center. He led fastbreaks. He made midrange jumpers. He flung smart passes to open teammates. Problem was, not enough of those teammates showed up during the Clippers' too-little, too-late 107-101 loss to the Oklahoma City Thunder. Griffin and Chris Paul came to play, but they aren't going to take the Clippers anywhere playing two on five.
OPINION
April 8, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
A story line has developed during Mayor Eric Garcetti's first nine months on the job, and it goes something like this: In stark contrast to his predecessor, Antonio Villaraigosa, who often held multiple news conferences a day and launched big initiatives, Garcetti has taken such a low-profile, behind-the-scenes approach that people wonder what he'll have to show for his first year in office. Though Garcetti hasn't avoided the limelight - he was on stage last week with former President Clinton, for instance - he often goes days without a public event, and he hasn't yet proposed a major program or policy change.
SPORTS
April 8, 2014 | By Broderick Turner
The Clippers know that their game against the Oklahoma City Thunder at Staples Center on Wednesday night is important. "It's a big game," Blake Griffin said Tuesday before practice. "You can't really dance around that. They are right in front of us. But at the same time, it's still going to go up to another level in the playoffs. It's not going to be quite like it is in the playoffs, but it will be an intense game. " If the Clippers defeat the Thunder, Los Angeles still has a chance to move past Oklahoma City in the ultra-competitive Western Conference.
SPORTS
April 7, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
 Elijah Stewart of Westchester has been selected the City Section basketball player of the year by a panel of coaches. Sam Sullivan of Fremont was named the coach of the year. First-team All-City: Serigne Athj, Birmingham, Jr.; Chance Comanche, View Park, Jr.; Devenir Duruisseau, Sylmar, Sr.; Layon Gooden, Westchester, Sr.; Maleke Haynes, El Camino Real, Sr.; Reverend Maduakor, Narbonne, Sr.; Uchenna Okeneme, Narbonne, Sr.; Stewart Ramirez, Eagle Rock, Sr.; Cesar Reyes, Poly, Jr.; Julian Richardson, El Camino Real, Sr.; Tramel Wilson, View Park, Jr.; Evan Wardlow, El Camino Real, Sr. All-Division I: Player of the year, Elijah Stewart.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Two Canadian cities, Vancouver and Montreal , have the world's best public library systems, according to a new survey by German researchers . Library mavens at the Heinrich Heine University in Dusseldorf studied libraries in 31 major world cities, from London and Los Angeles, and from Shanghai to Sao Paulo, Brazil. Los Angeles finished in the middle of the pack in the ranking (16th), which took into account the wide array of services that libraries provide to their readers, including availability of printed books and digital information.
BUSINESS
July 20, 2013 | By Cale Ottens
Thinking of escaping the summer heat? A new report lists the country's most "chill cities," based on daily high temperatures, humidity and nighttime low temperatures.  It's no surprise that sunny Southern California's weather means the region isn't represented in the top 10 list, but San Francisco came in at No. 3 and San Jose ranked No. 5.  Seattle topped the list, which ranks the largest U.S. metropolitan areas for summer comfort....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By David Zahniser
A veteran Los Angeles building inspector sentenced last month to prison in an FBI corruption case will continue to receive a yearly pension of more than $72,000, according to a high-level retirement official. Samuel In, 66, pleaded guilty last year, admitting as part of a plea agreement that he took more than $30,000 in bribes while working as a senior inspector. He was sentenced last month to 2 1/2 years in prison after a federal prosecutor argued against leniency, mentioning his "substantial" pension.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Anh Do
Of all the places in the world, why did Larry Agran have to choose Vietnam? That's what local Vietnamese Americans wondered after learning that the longtime Irvine councilman hoped to forge a relationship between the master-planned community and Nha Trang, a southern coastal city in Vietnam known for its beaches and scuba diving. To many who fled the country after it fell to communist forces, Agran's proposal seemed designed to cause hurt, and hundreds indicated they planned to confront Agran on Tuesday, when he was expected to propose that Irvine and Nha Trang form a "friendship city" relationship.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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