Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCities
IN THE NEWS

Cities

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 16, 2001
Re "Retailers See Gold in Poor Areas," May 12: This article proves the readiness of inner-city shoppers. Now, bring the stores that will have the most impact on lives: Bring bookstores to the inner city. Bring the biggest and best bookstores. Bring Borders, Barnes & Noble, Brentano's, Bookstar and any others that truly believe in the power of their product. They will thrive in this vital, untapped market. And as inner-city neighborhoods become print-rich environments, remarkably, test scores will rise in "failing" inner-city schools.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 27, 2014 | By Homero Aridjis
The first time I met Gabriel García Márquez, then an unknown writer in Mexico, was on July 6, 1962, in the office of the producer of Luis Buñuel's movie "Viridiana. " I remember the date well because after noticing the headline, Gabo asked to borrow the evening paper I had just bought, exclaiming "Dammit, today my master died," referring to William Faulkner. Faulkner famously detested intrusions in his private life, and the funeral in his native Oxford, Miss., was sparsely attended by several dozen family members, his publishers and a few writers.
Advertisement
SPORTS
April 18, 1989
Six cities have made official bids for the 26th Summer Olympic Games in 1996, the International Olympic Committee said. Bids received from national Olympic organizations by the April 15 deadline were for Atlanta; Athens; Belgrade, Yugoslavia; Manchester, England; Melbourne, Australia, and Toronto. The IOC said that the host city will be chosen at a meeting of all members in Tokyo in September of 1990.
OPINION
April 27, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
The recent revelation that the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department secretly conducted aerial surveillance of the entire city of Compton for nine days in 2012 prompted outrage from the city's mayor, its residents and civil liberties groups. The Sheriff's Department justified the surveillance by saying it was only a brief test of a program provided by a private security company. A small, manned Cessna plane equipped with an array of cameras flew six hours a day and only in daylight, beaming video information back to the local sheriff's station.
MAGAZINE
April 2, 2006 | Debra J. Miller, Debra J. Miller teaches English at a private high school in Los Angeles.
On Thursday, Oct. 8, 1964, the day the police decided my mother killed my father, I woke up late, the kind of late that snaps you out of your favorite dream, the one where you're wrapped in the arms of your favorite TV hunk--mine was Dr. Kildare--and he's just about to . . . when bang your unconscious tells you the sun is out, the lights are on all over the house and you're going to be late for school because nobody got you out of bed. We were a family of five. I was 14 and the oldest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1998 | AGNES DIGGS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you drove down the center of Hurstview Avenue heading east, you would be in the city of Monrovia. But your passenger would be in Duarte. Or hop on South Myrtle Avenue in Monrovia. As you cross Altern Street, you are under county jurisdiction for about half a mile. Pass Wayland Way and you return to Monrovia, but only for about 350 feet. Then it's back to the county again--for another three-eighths of a mile.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles is at a disadvantage competing with Las Vegas, New York and Miami for tourists who want a lively nightclub scene because of a California law that cuts off alcohol sales at 2 a.m., a state lawmaker contends. State Sen. Mark Leno (D-San Francisco) has introduced legislation that could extend the last call for alcohol in some California cities until 4 a.m. "This legislation would allow destination cities like San Francisco, Los Angeles and San Diego to start local conversations about the possibility of expanding night life and the benefits it could provide the community by boosting jobs, tourism and local tax revenue," Leno said.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
A couple of recent news articles about local approaches to housing issues offer a pretty stark contrast in smart policy and, well, not-so-smart policy. In the smart category, cities such as Washington and Philadelphia have long struggled with trying to strike an economic balance in reviving high-poverty, high-crime neighborhoods. The usual progression is that a battered area attracts some adventurous and dedicated residents who buy property and work hard to improve their new neighborhoods.
NEWS
June 29, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
In terms of sedentary lifestyle, Lexington, Ky., has some explaining to do, or perhaps, some light jogging and yard work. It topped the online list of “least active” cities by Men’s Health. The city joins Indianapolis; Jackson, Miss.; and Charleston, W.Va., as the nation’s top couch potato cities. In the ranking of 100 U.S. cities, the most active one was Seattle, followed by San Francisco and Oakland. Washington was fourth, with Western cities Salt Lake City and Reno right behind.
NEWS
August 8, 2012 | By Ben Benoit, Jeff DeGrandpre, John Denver, Ronald O. Loveridge, Laura Roughton and John F. Tavaglione
We cannot even begin to say how disappointed we are by The Times' Aug. 3 editorial regarding the Inland Empire and our four recently incorporated Riverside County cities of Jurupa Valley, Eastvale, Wildomar and Menifee. The implication that all other California cities are subsidizing our communities is not remotely true. To the contrary, we have been subsidizing other communities for years as unincorporated areas when our locally paid tax dollars left our area because we weren't cities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2014 | By a Times staff writer
The industrial city of Vernon in southeast Los Angeles County has long been known for its small number of residents and voters - just 42 turned out for a municipal election last year, for example. So on Friday, when city leaders and state and national elected officials announced the groundbreaking of a new apartment complex in the city, it was hailed as a good governance reform that will bring more voters to the city. The 45-unit Vernon Village Park is hailed as an environmentally conscious, energy-efficient facility that, as city officials put it, "will make the concept of a live/work community a reality in Vernon.
SPORTS
April 26, 2014 | By Bill Shaikin
You're the mayor. A guy walks into City Hall and offers to spend half a billion bucks to revitalize property owned by the city, at no cost to the city. What do you say? If you're Anaheim Mayor Tom Tait, you call it a taxpayer giveaway. This is not a knock at Tait. This is a tip of the cap toward a mayor who has been so incredibly successful in framing the debate surrounding the Angels' stadium lease negotiations that the process has ground to a dead halt. It has been six months since the Anaheim City Council voted to approve the framework of a deal designed to keep the Angels in town for the long term, and to determine how to cover the estimated $150 million needed to keep Angel Stadium up and running for the long term.
WORLD
April 26, 2014 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Tom Kington
Tens of thousands of pilgrims were gathering here Saturday in heady anticipation of Sunday's dual canonization of two of the most influential popes of recent times, John Paul II and John XXIII. It will mark the first time in the long history of the Roman Catholic Church that two ex-popes are made saints on the same day. On Saturday, the Vatican confirmed another first - retired Pope Benedict XVI will assist Pope Francis during the sainthood ceremony. That means two living popes will help canonize a pair of their predecessors in a singular celebration of four pontiffs, alive and dead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2014 | Steve Lopez
Let me state my bias up front. I like hot sauce. I like it on eggs. I like it in ramen. I like it on stir-fry dishes and Mexican food, and I don't think you can honestly call yourself a Californian if you're not a hot sauce lover. And so I went to Irwindale last week to investigate the Sriracha sauce standoff. As you may have heard, city officials are waging battle against the manufacturer, responding to citizen complaints that jalapeño-scented air blowing out of the hot sauce plant can irritate your throat and make your eyes water, especially during the late summer, which is pepper-grinding season.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | By Bob Pool
Los Angeles' chief surveyor stood above the newly unearthed brick and mortar pipe and carefully opened a 127-year-old leather book. "Here is the pipe. It's exactly where they said it was in 1887," said Tony Pratt, carefully pointing to a hand-drawn map in the ancient field guide. Freddie Eaton was the chief surveyor back then, the field guide noted. Eaton would eventually go on to become the city's mayor and a prominent figure in the expansion of L.A. Pratt pulled the old city surveyor's field report from city archives this week after reading a news account about the discovery of a remnant of the original Zanja Madre - the town's original water network - beneath a Chinatown construction site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | By David Zahniser
A grass-roots group that has been railing against Los Angeles' parking ticket policies has agreed to team up with Mayor Eric Garcetti to look at changes to the enforcement system. Steven Vincent, founder of the Los Angeles Parking Freedom Initiative, said Garcetti invited members of his organization to participate in an official city working group. The panel, Vincent said, will look at an array of possible changes, such as reducing certain fines, expanding parking hours in key locations, making no-parking signs less confusing and halting the practice of using ticket revenue as a tool to balance the city's budget.
OPINION
July 29, 2012
Re "A tale of two cities," Opinion, July 25 Harold Meyerson blames banks and big business for the collapse of our economy, especially for the bankruptcies of California cities hit hard by the bursting of the housing bubble. Rather, the federal government encouraged the irresponsible lending to increase homeownership. Banks would never have been successful in making so many subprime loans if Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae weren't buying them. Wall Street also bought these toxic loans and rated them as AAA securities.
OPINION
August 3, 2012
If communities in California have the desire and the tax base to make it on their own as independent cities, without increasing the resource burdens on their county governments or their neighbors or the state, then as a rule of thumb they ought to be able to give it a go. Self-governance and home rule are integral parts of American liberty. But in their first few years after incorporation, cities are likely to need a financial boost from the rest of us, and right now, well - sorry, Jurupa Valley, Menifee, Wildomar and Eastvale, but we can't afford you. With three much more established cities already in bankruptcy (Stockton, San Bernardino and Mammoth Lakes)
BUSINESS
April 25, 2014 | Marc Lifsher
State lawmakers have come up with a way to help California cities deal with a proliferation of massage parlors with suspected links to prostitution and human trafficking. New legislation is aimed at fixing an inadvertent loophole created by a 2008 law that created a state-sponsored council to oversee the regulation of legitimate massage therapy businesses, such as spas and clinics. The loophole led to an explosion of massage parlors in many cities. For example, their number grew by nearly 500% to 75 in the city of Huntington Beach between 2009 and 2013.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The ride-sharing service Lyft launched in 24 more cities Thursday, growing its total presence to 60 cities across the U.S. The company also cut the price of fares by 10% in all markets as it seeks to continue increasing ridership. Thursday's announcement is easily the company's most aggressive expansion so far, and for the next two weeks, users in the new cities will be able to take rides with Lyft for free. The bulk of the new areas added Thursday were mid-size cities around the country.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|