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Cities Federal Aid

BUSINESS
October 3, 1990 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After watching the flow of federal assistance shrink in the past decade, community development officials see signs of a potential turnaround in the proposed federal budget, which would direct investment into poor communities and extend the life of low-income housing tax breaks. But officials are quick to point out that the assistance--primarily in the form of tax breaks--still falls short of what is needed to rejuvenate depressed communities and satisfy the demand for affordable housing.
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NEWS
June 17, 1991 | Associated Press
The nation's mayors warned Sunday that more cities could follow Bridgeport, Conn., into bankruptcy without an infusion of $12 billion in new federal aid to address urban problems. The aid request from big-city Democratic mayors cleared a key procedural hurdle at the U. S. Conference of Mayors' annual meeting despite warnings from Republicans and some other mayors that Congress and the Bush Administration were in no mood for an urban bailout.
NEWS
June 14, 1991 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An attempt by the Senate to pass a landmark transportation bill dissolved early today as an acrimonious fight broke out among the states over their shares of billions of dollars in federal aid for highways and mass transit systems. The failure to settle on a compromise aid allocation plan that would have permitted Senate passage of the bill clearly angered the measure's principal author, Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-N. Y.).
NEWS
July 17, 1991 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defending his decision not to adjust the 1990 census, Commerce Secretary Robert A. Mosbacher assured Congress Tuesday that statistical surveys may be used to adjust funding levels for federal programs before the next census in the year 2000. An adjustment would mitigate the effects of a low population count on cities and states with large minority populations. Such jurisdictions would be most affected by Mosbacher's decision not to add to census figures about 5.
NEWS
July 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Senate thwarted an attempt by Republicans to use the bulk of a $3.3-billion anti-crime bill to put more police officers on the streets. By a vote of 49 to 39, the Senate killed an amendment by Sen. Warren B. Rudman (R-N.H.) that would have set aside $2.2 billion for direct aid to help states, counties, cities and towns hire more officers. The money would have been disbursed on the basis of a community's population. Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. (D-Del.
NEWS
January 26, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. mayors called on the federal government to reverse a decade-long plunge in aid to cities despite the strain the Gulf War is putting on the nation's finances. The mayors, concluding their winter meeting, released a 50-city survey that found the federal contribution to city budgets dropped 64% from 1980 to 1990. Philadelphia Mayor W. Wilson Goode told a House panel: "Give us the tools we need to fight the war on drugs, against AIDS."
NEWS
June 12, 1988
Many of the nation's mayors at a conference in Salt Lake City urged an increase in federal aid to cities and greater local control over the spending of federal funds. Participants at the 56th annual U.S. Conference of Mayors, meeting for the third day of the six-day event, said more money is needed to combat drug abuse, AIDS and homelessness. They complained that federal policies under the Reagan Administration have given local governments little role to play in dealing with the nation's ills.
NEWS
December 8, 1988 | Associated Press
New York City Mayor Edward I. Koch challenged President-elect George Bush on Wednesday to give the nation's cities more help in dealing with AIDS, drug abuse, homelessness and job training. In a speech at the final session of the annual National League of Cities conference, Koch said the federal government must no longer "slough off its responsibilities" onto states and cities.
NEWS
July 13, 1988
Two of three U.S. cities increased fees for local services last year and two of five raised local property taxes as municipal governments continued struggling to find sources of revenue to compensate for increasingly scarce federal funds, a survey showed. More than half of the 347 cities that responded to a poll by the National League of Cities slowed the growth of their operating budgets and 44% reported reductions in spending on capital construction projects.
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