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OPINION
July 29, 2012
Re "A tale of two cities," Opinion, July 25 Harold Meyerson blames banks and big business for the collapse of our economy, especially for the bankruptcies of California cities hit hard by the bursting of the housing bubble. Rather, the federal government encouraged the irresponsible lending to increase homeownership. Banks would never have been successful in making so many subprime loans if Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae weren't buying them. Wall Street also bought these toxic loans and rated them as AAA securities.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Two Canadian cities, Vancouver and Montreal , have the world's best public library systems, according to a new survey by German researchers . Library mavens at the Heinrich Heine University in Dusseldorf studied libraries in 31 major world cities, from London and Los Angeles, and from Shanghai to Sao Paulo, Brazil. Los Angeles finished in the middle of the pack in the ranking (16th), which took into account the wide array of services that libraries provide to their readers, including availability of printed books and digital information.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
The denizens of San Jose, that Silicon Valley gem, haul in a median household income of $76,593, making the city the wealthiest in the country. That's compared with the national figure of $50,502, according to new data from the U.S. Census Bureau. In San Jose, 13.9% of residents go without health insurance coverage, compared with 15.1% nationally. Of the preschool-age population, 56.8% was enrolled in school, compared with 47.4% around the country. Fewer than three in 10 Americans over age 25 have a bachelor's degree; 36.6% of that demographic in San Jose have graduated from college.
NATIONAL
June 28, 2012 | By Don Lee, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Since the advent of the automobile in the 1920s, America's suburbs have been growing faster than cities as people fled urban life for quieter, less-crowded expanses. But new Census Bureau data indicate that, in general, cities last year grew faster than suburbs, reflecting an urban renaissance accelerated by the Great Recession. For all 51 metro areas with a million or more people, cities as a whole grew by 1.1% from 2010 to 2011, while suburbs increased 0.9%.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
In the wake of the Great Recession, rich and poor households are separated by stark geographical divides. Most of the country's rich live in cities, while households below the poverty line are concentrated in the countryside and in some inner-city enclaves, according to an analysis by the Institute for Spatial Economic Analysis at the University of Redlands. The middle class creates buffer zones between the two. A map of income distrubution shows a sea of pink in rural America and the South, representing the bottom 25% of earners, while bright orange, representing the 10% of the highest earners, dots the Eastern Seaboard and coast of California.
SPORTS
April 30, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
The United States Olympic Committee's executive board voted Friday for Atlanta over Minneapolis-St. Paul as the country's bid city for the 1996 Summer Olympics. The USOC would not reveal the count of the secret balloting, but reliable sources who were present for the vote at the Washington Hilton Hotel said it was 65-42 in favor of Atlanta. "The work just starts now," Atlanta Mayor Andrew Young said.
SCIENCE
January 30, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
The California Air Resources Board thinks a little friendly competition might inspire Californians to scale back their driving, cut electricity use and take other steps to reduce carbon emissions. The agency on Thursday announced a second round of the CoolCalifornia City Challenge , where cities compete to see how much they can cut their emissions of greenhouse gases that are causing climate change. On the line is $100,000 in prize money that will go to cities based on how many people they sign up and how many points they earn in an online tracking system.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2012 | By Roger Vincent
Asia - most notably Beijing - is experiencing a boom in office rents fueled by rising demand and increasingly limited supply, a real estate brokerage said. Rents for prime office space in Beijing rose 75% last year to $130 per square foot per year, the highest increase of any city in the world in 2011, according to Cushman & Wakefield. Hong Kong remains the most expensive city for office space in terms of total occupancy costs at $244 per square foot, followed by London's West End at $239 a square foot and Tokyo at $197 a square foot.
NEWS
June 29, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
In terms of sedentary lifestyle, Lexington, Ky., has some explaining to do, or perhaps, some light jogging and yard work. It topped the online list of “least active” cities by Men’s Health. The city joins Indianapolis; Jackson, Miss.; and Charleston, W.Va., as the nation’s top couch potato cities. In the ranking of 100 U.S. cities, the most active one was Seattle, followed by San Francisco and Oakland. Washington was fourth, with Western cities Salt Lake City and Reno right behind.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2012 | By David Lazarus
Here's your fortunate-son Friday roundup of consumer news from around the Web: --Are there better cities for singles? Our friends at Kiplinger's Personal Finance crunched the numbers and found that there are, based on such stats as how many households are single versus married, whether those households are affluent enough to date, and just what a date might cost. The top city in the country to be single turns out to be Ann Arbor, Mich. More than half of the city's population is single, thanks in part to proximity to the University of Michigan.
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