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BUSINESS
January 6, 1995
Each month, companies across California send sales tax revenue to the state. The state then rebates 1% of the funds back to the cities where the companies are based. The money is then channeled to local governments.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2010 | By Jessica Garrison, Kim Christensen and Doug Smith, Los Angeles Times
Cities across California have skirted or ignored laws requiring them to build affordable homes and in the process mismanaged hundreds of millions in taxpayer dollars, a Times investigation has found. At least 120 municipalities ? nearly one in three with active redevelopment agencies ? spent a combined $700 million in housing funds from 2000 to 2008 without constructing a single new unit, the newspaper's analysis of state data shows. Nor did most of them add to the housing stock by rehabilitating existing units.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
What makes for a popular convention city? Is it the size of the population or the quality of local attractions? No. It's all about the amount of meeting space. That's why Orlando, Fla., and Las Vegas attract the really big gatherings, while Los Angeles continues to struggle to draw the mega-conventions. It's the conclusion of Cvent, one of the nation's largest convention management and technology firms, based on the company's analysis of a year's worth of its bookings and other sales.
SPORTS
April 24, 2010 | By Sam Farmer
Could part of the three-day NFL draft be coming to Los Angeles next year? Commissioner Roger Goodell said the league is looking into staging the event in multiple cities next year, in light of the success of its first prime-time opening round. "We have talked about whether you move to a location, or maybe you move one day of the draft," Goodell told Richard Deitsch of SI.com. "If we are successful doing the draft on three days, that may be one alternative, to take one of those days and move it to a different location."
BUSINESS
July 15, 2012 | By Ken Bensinger, Kim Christensen and Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
The decision by three California cities to seek bankruptcy protection in the space of two weeks is unlikely to presage a wave of copycat filings. But it does underscore the mounting financial pressure facing local governments around the country. Collapsing property values and entrenched unemployment have pushed cities and counties to the economic brink. Tax receipts in some locales have shrunk more than 20% over the last three years, and soaring pension costs exceed funding levels by as much as $3 trillion nationwide.
OPINION
June 22, 2009 | GREGORY RODRIGUEZ
The Obama administration is reportedly considering backing a radical plan to shrink deteriorating American cities by bulldozing entire neighborhoods and returning the land to nature. The idea, which originated in Flint, Mich. -- cratered by the auto industry implosion -- is to persuade disintegrating and depopulated cities to embrace their shrinkage, destroy abandoned infrastructure, save money and thereby stave off fiscal ruin. The plan makes sense on some level, but it's disturbing on another.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
The documentary "The Human Scale" explores and celebrates the successful pedestrianization of various cities around the globe, particularly those that have been modified under the visionary eye of Danish architect and urban planner Jan Gehl. However, writer-director Andreas M. Dalsgaard takes such a low-key approach to presenting the film's vital, potentially involving topic that viewers may find themselves more inspired to take a snooze than a stroll. Dalsgaard, who also provides the movie's quiet, clipped-voiced narration, travels to such far-flung spots as Chongqing, China; Siena, Italy; Melbourne, Australia; Christchurch, New Zealand; Dhaka, Bangladesh (the world's fastest-growing city)
BUSINESS
April 10, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
Major wireless carriers are teaming up to combat cellphone theft, and there are some cities in the U.S. where smartphone owners should be doing cartwheels. The FCC on Tuesday morning announced a new effort with top wireless carriers, including AT&T, T-Mobile and Sprint, to create a central stolen-phone database. The move will likely benefit all cellphone users, but some cities in particular have a huge problem with phones that go missing -- Philadelphia tops the list. Seattle is second, followed by Oakland and Long Beach in California, according to a San Francisco-based mobile security firm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2011 | By Joseph SernaLos Angeles Times
Barred by the courts from slashing its payroll by outsourcing city jobs to private companies, Costa Mesa is now exploring forming partnerships with neighboring cities to share municipal services. City officials said they are looking into sharing such things as police SWAT teams, emergency dispatch operations and animal control. Costa Mesa has become a flash point in California in the debate over government finances for its plan to reduce expenses and pension costs by cutting more than 200 workers, a drastic proposal that has caught the attention of political and labor interests throughout the state.
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