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ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
The documentary "The Human Scale" explores and celebrates the successful pedestrianization of various cities around the globe, particularly those that have been modified under the visionary eye of Danish architect and urban planner Jan Gehl. However, writer-director Andreas M. Dalsgaard takes such a low-key approach to presenting the film's vital, potentially involving topic that viewers may find themselves more inspired to take a snooze than a stroll. Dalsgaard, who also provides the movie's quiet, clipped-voiced narration, travels to such far-flung spots as Chongqing, China; Siena, Italy; Melbourne, Australia; Christchurch, New Zealand; Dhaka, Bangladesh (the world's fastest-growing city)
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BUSINESS
January 6, 1995
Each month, companies across California send sales tax revenue to the state. The state then rebates 1% of the funds back to the cities where the companies are based. The money is then channeled to local governments.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2010 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
One more good reason to drive safely in California: If you cause an accident, you may be on the hook to pay the police and firefighters who show up to help. At least 50 cities in the state have adopted so-called crash-tax laws allowing local governments to seek reimbursement from insurance companies for the costs of sending public emergency crews to accident scenes. The fees can amount to hundreds or even thousands of dollars. If insurers don't pay, cities can hire collection agents to seek payment from the motorists involved.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
In the wake of the Great Recession, rich and poor households are separated by stark geographical divides. Most of the country's rich live in cities, while households below the poverty line are concentrated in the countryside and in some inner-city enclaves, according to an analysis by the Institute for Spatial Economic Analysis at the University of Redlands. The middle class creates buffer zones between the two. A map of income distrubution shows a sea of pink in rural America and the South, representing the bottom 25% of earners, while bright orange, representing the 10% of the highest earners, dots the Eastern Seaboard and coast of California.
SPORTS
April 24, 2010 | By Sam Farmer
Could part of the three-day NFL draft be coming to Los Angeles next year? Commissioner Roger Goodell said the league is looking into staging the event in multiple cities next year, in light of the success of its first prime-time opening round. "We have talked about whether you move to a location, or maybe you move one day of the draft," Goodell told Richard Deitsch of SI.com. "If we are successful doing the draft on three days, that may be one alternative, to take one of those days and move it to a different location."
BUSINESS
August 12, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
What makes for a popular convention city? Is it the size of the population or the quality of local attractions? No. It's all about the amount of meeting space. That's why Orlando, Fla., and Las Vegas attract the really big gatherings, while Los Angeles continues to struggle to draw the mega-conventions. It's the conclusion of Cvent, one of the nation's largest convention management and technology firms, based on the company's analysis of a year's worth of its bookings and other sales.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2011 | By Sharon Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Architect Stefanos Polyzoides is a godfather of the hugely influential movement in architecture and urban planning known as the New Urbanism. All those suburbs that decided to put in little downtowns and walkable areas? The whole loft thing? Infill development that puts condos in empty lots instead of sprawl out in the exurbs? Credit Polyzoides, his wife, Elizabeth Moule, and a small group of colleagues for co-founding the influential movement ? and Polyzoides for giving it a name.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2012 | By David Colker, Los Angeles Times
Ever wonder what the typical cost of an airport taxi ride is for major cities around the world? The Associated Press sent reporters out with a tourist's itinerary on a weekday in June in five cities around the world to compare various costs. Here's what they found in regard to taxi rides from major airports into cities: Tokyo, $82.40; 20 minutes from Haneda Airport, which is being used by a growing number of international tourists. Fare from Narita International Airport runs $300.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2011 | By Joseph SernaLos Angeles Times
Barred by the courts from slashing its payroll by outsourcing city jobs to private companies, Costa Mesa is now exploring forming partnerships with neighboring cities to share municipal services. City officials said they are looking into sharing such things as police SWAT teams, emergency dispatch operations and animal control. Costa Mesa has become a flash point in California in the debate over government finances for its plan to reduce expenses and pension costs by cutting more than 200 workers, a drastic proposal that has caught the attention of political and labor interests throughout the state.
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