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BUSINESS
February 3, 2012 | By Roger Vincent
Asia - most notably Beijing - is experiencing a boom in office rents fueled by rising demand and increasingly limited supply, a real estate brokerage said. Rents for prime office space in Beijing rose 75% last year to $130 per square foot per year, the highest increase of any city in the world in 2011, according to Cushman & Wakefield. Hong Kong remains the most expensive city for office space in terms of total occupancy costs at $244 per square foot, followed by London's West End at $239 a square foot and Tokyo at $197 a square foot.
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NEWS
June 29, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
In terms of sedentary lifestyle, Lexington, Ky., has some explaining to do, or perhaps, some light jogging and yard work. It topped the online list of “least active” cities by Men’s Health. The city joins Indianapolis; Jackson, Miss.; and Charleston, W.Va., as the nation’s top couch potato cities. In the ranking of 100 U.S. cities, the most active one was Seattle, followed by San Francisco and Oakland. Washington was fourth, with Western cities Salt Lake City and Reno right behind.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2012 | By David Lazarus
Here's your fortunate-son Friday roundup of consumer news from around the Web: --Are there better cities for singles? Our friends at Kiplinger's Personal Finance crunched the numbers and found that there are, based on such stats as how many households are single versus married, whether those households are affluent enough to date, and just what a date might cost. The top city in the country to be single turns out to be Ann Arbor, Mich. More than half of the city's population is single, thanks in part to proximity to the University of Michigan.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1995
Each month, companies across California send sales tax revenue to the state. The state then rebates 1% of the funds back to the cities where the companies are based. The money is then channeled to local governments.
SPORTS
April 24, 2010 | By Sam Farmer
Could part of the three-day NFL draft be coming to Los Angeles next year? Commissioner Roger Goodell said the league is looking into staging the event in multiple cities next year, in light of the success of its first prime-time opening round. "We have talked about whether you move to a location, or maybe you move one day of the draft," Goodell told Richard Deitsch of SI.com. "If we are successful doing the draft on three days, that may be one alternative, to take one of those days and move it to a different location."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2009 | Alexandra Zavis and Cara Mia DiMassa
Some cities have decided the best way to use their federal stimulus funds is to barter with other municipalities, prompting a warning Tuesday that some of these transactions are prohibited. At least three Southland cities are proposing to swap their anticipated share of federal money earmarked for highway improvements for funds that they could use as they see fit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores, Los Angeles Times
Eight years ago, a Los Angeles County government oversight panel examined the string of small working-class cities along the 710 Freeway and gave them a relatively clean bill of health. Then a series of corruption scandals in southeast L.A. County roiled the region and made national headlines. Prosecutors filed public-corruption charges in Bell, Vernon, Commerce, Cudahy and Lynwood. Investigations are ongoing in Maywood and in at least one water district. Now the Los Angeles County Local Agency Formation Commission is taking another look.
OPINION
June 22, 2009 | GREGORY RODRIGUEZ
The Obama administration is reportedly considering backing a radical plan to shrink deteriorating American cities by bulldozing entire neighborhoods and returning the land to nature. The idea, which originated in Flint, Mich. -- cratered by the auto industry implosion -- is to persuade disintegrating and depopulated cities to embrace their shrinkage, destroy abandoned infrastructure, save money and thereby stave off fiscal ruin. The plan makes sense on some level, but it's disturbing on another.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
What makes for a popular convention city? Is it the size of the population or the quality of local attractions? No. It's all about the amount of meeting space. That's why Orlando, Fla., and Las Vegas attract the really big gatherings, while Los Angeles continues to struggle to draw the mega-conventions. It's the conclusion of Cvent, one of the nation's largest convention management and technology firms, based on the company's analysis of a year's worth of its bookings and other sales.
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