YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCities


August 31, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores and Marisa Gerber
Saturday was supposed to be a big day for Billy DePalma. He envisioned a ribbon cutting and then a steady stream of new customers perusing colorful, pen-shaped electronic cigarettes behind glass cases. They'd gawk at his impressive selection of liquid nicotine - flavors like Hubba Bubba Grape, Gummy Bear and Orange Cream Soda - as he fielded questions about the fast-growing trend of "vaping," so-called because users inhale the vapor produced when the liquid is heated. Instead, drywall litters the floor of his dark shop.
January 23, 2011 | By Sharon Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Architect Stefanos Polyzoides is a godfather of the hugely influential movement in architecture and urban planning known as the New Urbanism. All those suburbs that decided to put in little downtowns and walkable areas? The whole loft thing? Infill development that puts condos in empty lots instead of sprawl out in the exurbs? Credit Polyzoides, his wife, Elizabeth Moule, and a small group of colleagues for co-founding the influential movement ? and Polyzoides for giving it a name.
May 31, 2012 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
A Sacramento County Superior Court judge Wednesday ruled against a group of California cities in their battle with the state over hundreds of millions of property tax dollars that used to flow to local redevelopment agencies. Judge Timothy M. Frawley said he would not grant the request from Glendale, Pasadena, Huntington Beach and other cities for an injunction that would have prevented the payout of property taxes on Friday to schools and counties. Cities believe some of the money belongs to them and should be used to pay for such projects as parks, affordable housing and freeway intersections that had been agreed upon before Gov. Jerry Brown won his battle to eliminate California's 400 municipal redevelopment agencies late last year.
April 8, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores, Los Angeles Times
Eight years ago, a Los Angeles County government oversight panel examined the string of small working-class cities along the 710 Freeway and gave them a relatively clean bill of health. Then a series of corruption scandals in southeast L.A. County roiled the region and made national headlines. Prosecutors filed public-corruption charges in Bell, Vernon, Commerce, Cudahy and Lynwood. Investigations are ongoing in Maywood and in at least one water district. Now the Los Angeles County Local Agency Formation Commission is taking another look.
December 15, 2013 | By Jen Leo
This app provides a quick visual take on popular destinations - it's like having a concierge in the palm of your hand. Name: Jetpac City Guides Available for : iPhone, iPad What it does: Analyzes public Instagram photos and turns their research into fun, bite-sized, list-driven guides to 5,000 cities around the globe. Cost: Free What's hot: It's a wild, refreshing destination guide using Instagram photos - whether you're looking for Hipster Hangouts, Bars That Women Love, Top Outdoor Places, Top Urban Spaces, Top Places to Stay or more.
June 7, 2013 | By Cale Ottens
Looking for a cheap fixer-upper? You might check the list of the 15 best cities for do-it-yourself housing bargains, published this week by RealtyTrac, the Irvine-based real estate data firm. Shocker: No California cities made the list. The five best cities to find a bargain home are in the Rust Belt: Detroit, Chicago, Cleveland, St. Louis and Cincinnati.  The rankings come from the number of bank-owned homes that were built before 1960 and are valued under $100,000.  There are 3,773 such homes in Detroit, which is more than double Chicago's inventory, which is ranked just below the Michigan city.  Phoenix is the closest city to Southern California that made the list and ranks No. 8 on the list with 763 such homes.
August 20, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Coastal flooding could cost big cities more than $60 billion a year by mid-century, with losses jumping even more dramatically if nothing is done to counter rising sea levels and subsiding land, a new study has found. A team of researchers analyzed data on flood exposure in 136 of the world's largest coastal cities to project steep increases in economic losses, from an estimated $6 billion a year in 2005 to $52 billion by 2050 based on changes in population, economic growth and urbanization.
September 25, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Home prices in the nation's largest cities rose 1.6% in July to their highest level in nearly two years, according to a leading index released Tuesday, adding to recent data showing the housing market finally has begun its rebound from the deep recession. The Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller index of prices in the 20 biggest U.S. cities rose for the fourth straight month. And in a sign the rebound is broad-based, it was the third consecutive month that prices rose in all 20 cities from the previous month.
April 12, 2013 | By Lauren Williams
A 16-year partnership that provided police helicopter patrols to Newport Beach and neighboring Costa Mesa has officially been dissolved, a victim of budget-tightening. Both cities instead are contracting with Huntington Beach to provide helicopter patrol at $700 an hour. In a final move Thursday, Airborne Law Enforcement board members -- who represented the two Orange County cities -- voted to dissolve the program. They'd earlier agreed to sell off three remaining police helicopters and dispose of 5,000 gallons of unused fuel.
Los Angeles Times Articles