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NEWS
March 20, 2014 | By Ken Schwencke
A shallow magnitude 2.7 earthquake was reported Thursday evening six miles from Universal City, California, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The temblor occurred at 7:17 p.m. Pacific time at a depth of 0 miles. According to the USGS, the epicenter was six miles from Beverly Hills, California, eight miles from West Hollywood, California and eight miles from San Fernando, California. In the past ten days, there has been one earthquake magnitude 3.0 and greater centered nearby.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | By F. Kathleen Foley
Although a bit hyperbolic at times, Pearl Cleage's period drama, “Flyin' West,” now at the International City Theatre in Long Beach, is nonetheless a ripping good yarn that excites our sympathies throughout. The action transpires in the historical setting of Nicodemus, Kansas - an all-black enclave that was settled in the aftermath of the Civil War, as freed slaves fled the atrocities of the Jim Crow south. It's here that feisty, gun-toting Sophie (Cheri Lynne VandenHeuvel)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By David Zahniser
The Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday voted unanimously to pay $185,000 to end a lawsuit over a rear-end collision involving a city car driven by Councilman Jose Huizar. On a 14-0 vote, council members signed off on the payout to David Ceja, a former Huntington Park police officer whose vehicle was struck by Huizar's city-owned SUV in 2012. The council approved the agreement without comment. Because the settlement was treated as a consent item, lawmakers did not discuss the case -- either in open session or behind closed doors -- during the meeting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc
The oil-rich city of Carson has imposed an emergency moratorium on all new drilling, halting efforts by a petroleum company to bore more than 200 wells near homes and a state university. The drilling ban, which runs for 45 days but could be extended up to two years, was driven by a fear that Occidental Petroleum would employ hydraulic fracturing to coax oil from one of the city's vast oil fields. Occidental has repeatedly denied it will use fracking, an extraction technique that involves blasting a mix of water, chemicals and sand deep into the ground to fracture rock formations and free trapped oil. Critics contend the practice can contaminate groundwater or even trigger earthquakes when water is injected underground.
SPORTS
March 18, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
 Paid attendance for the City Section Division I finals in basketball at L.A. Southwest two weeks ago was 1,517, according to the City Section athletics office. Division III and V finals at Roybal was 1,298. Division II at Roybal was 1,376. Division IV at Roybal was 662.   Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2014 | By David Zahniser
One year after Los Angeles voters rejected a sales tax increase, the City Council is looking at trying again - this time by tying the money to the repair of the city's deteriorating network of streets. Two high-level City Hall policy advisors recommended Tuesday that lawmakers place a half-cent tax hike on the November ballot that would generate $4.5 billion over 15 years. The proceeds, they said, would pay to fix the most severely damaged roads and sidewalks. Passage of a tax could add momentum to Mayor Eric Garcetti's "back to basics" campaign, which focuses on upgrading basic services.
NATIONAL
March 18, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK -- The main pipeline running beneath Park Avenue on the block where a blast killed eight people was leaking outside one of the buildings destroyed, investigators said Tuesday, but they have not determined the cause of the leak. It also is too soon to know whether that leak is what caused the massive March 12 explosion in East Harlem, which destroyed two buildings between 116th and 117th streets. The discovery of the leak came as officials from the National Transportation Safety Board, which investigates pipeline blasts, conducted pressure tests on the cast iron gas main and the smaller feeder lines that serve buildings on the block.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By David Zahniser and Emily Alpert Reyes
L.A.'s top budget official on Monday advised the city's elected leaders to resist the temptation to expand services, saying they should work toward eliminating a recurring deficit by 2018 instead. In a 37-page report, City Administrative Officer Miguel Santana said a rebounding economy and greater stability in the city's own finances have created new pressure to add or expand local government. He recommended that council members focus on other initiatives, such as reducing entry-level city salaries and securing new health-care concessions from the workforce.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By David Zahniser
Los Angeles' top budget official Monday advised city leaders to resist the temptation to expand services, saying they should work instead toward eliminating a recurring deficit by 2018. In a 37-page report, City Administrative Officer Miguel Santana said a rebounding economy and greater stability in the city's finances have created new pressure to add or expand local government. He recommended that council members focus on initiatives to stabilize the budget, such as reducing entry-level city salaries and securing new healthcare concessions from the workforce.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2014 | By Meg James
Time Warner Cable Inc. has stirred anger over its hike in subscription rates for customers and its efforts to extract hefty fees from rivals to air the L.A. Dodgers channel. Now it has incurred the wrath of city officials. On Friday, the city of Los Angeles sued the cable giant, alleging it stiffed the city on franchise fees over four years through 2011. The city seeks nearly $10 million in fees, money it said could have helped ease its budget problems during the financial crisis.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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