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Citizen Kane

ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2012 | By Patrick Kevin Day
The TV ads for director Steven Soderbergh's "Magic Mike" are calling it the "Citizen Kane" of stripper movies, and who knows, maybe it is? (The reviews for the movie have been generally positive.) But if "Magic Mike" is the "Citizen Kane" of stripper movies, then what does that make all the stripper movies that came before? Where does "Showgirls" fall in the cinematic canon? How about "Zombie Strippers?" There can be only one "Citizen Kane" of stripper movies, but not all stripper movies are built the same.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
When the film "Citizen Kane" came out in 1941, William Randolph Hearst gave it an unequivocal two thumbs down. The press lord kept ads for the film out of his many newspapers. Just before its release, one of his allies in Hollywood tried to buy the footage in order to burn it. Another approached FBI chief J. Edgar Hoover, who launched a decade-long investigation of Orson Welles, the film's 26-year-old director, producer, co-writer and star. But rosebuds bloom in unlikely places.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2011
The Academy Award statuette that Orson Welles won for the original screenplay of "Citizen Kane" was auctioned for more than $861,000 in Los Angeles. The 1942 Oscar was thought to be lost for decades. It surfaced in 1994 when cinematographer Gary Graver tried to sell it. The sale was stopped by Beatrice Welles, Orson's youngest daughter and sole heir. Welles, who wrote the screenplay for "Citizen Kane" with Herman Mankiewicz, also directed and starred in the film, considered by most critics to be one of the best of all time.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2009 | By Roger Moore
Christian McKay didn't like the comparison the first time he heard it. The words "You look a bit like Orson Welles" could send any young actor screaming back to his personal trainer. "It was at RADA [the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art], and I was incredibly upset," the British actor recalls. "My generation remembers the older Orson being interviewed on ' Merv Griffin' and 'Parkinson' [a long-running BBC chat show]. And selling sherry. And being enormous, 350 pounds! I thought anybody seeing a resemblance was having a go at my weight."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2009 | By Saul Austerlitz
There are not one but two legends of Orson Welles, overlapping but contradictory. In the first, a brilliant wunderkind is undermined by studio skulduggery and a certain naiveté, never fulfilling his exorbitant talent; in the second, that same wunderkind is a boozy blowhard who betrays his talent with alcohol, easy pleasures and a fatal lack of artistic rigor. Both bear some resemblance to the director of "Citizen Kane," but alone, neither is enough to convey the vastness of the larger-than-life character.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2009 | Susan King
It's a tough call for classic film lovers on Friday -- Kurosawa or Welles? The beautifully restored print of Akira Kurosawa's landmark 1950 drama "Rashomon" visits the Nuart Theatre for a one-week engagement beginning Friday. Toshiro Mifune, Masayuki Mori and Machiko Kyo star in this groundbreaking examination of human nature that revolves around four people's differing accounts of a man's murder and the rape of his wife. www.landmarktheatres.com Effects pioneer Meanwhile, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is featuring a newly struck print of Orson Welles' 1941 masterwork "Citizen Kane" on Friday at the Linwood Dunn Theater.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2009 | Reed Johnson
Of all the myths enshrouding Michael Jackson's too-brief life, none was more potent than his image as the isolated artist, the tormented creative soul cut off from ordinary mortals. It's an archetype with a strongly American pedigree, as grizzled and hoary as Citizen Kane clutching his snow globe while he sits alone in Xanadu, brooding on happier days. Thoreau took to his cabin in the woods. Howard Hughes hid out naked in germ-free hotels. Elvis holed up in Graceland under the sway of drugs and a byzantine retinue of friends and false comforters.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2009 | Susan King
Celebrating its 15th anniversary today, Turner Classic Movies, the commercial-free cable network specializing in vintage and contemporary classic films, has never altered its modus operandi. The channel, which reaches 80 million homes, shows 400 different films each month and augments them with TCM-produced documentaries on actors, genres and directors, as well as interviews, guest programmers and franchises such as silent films on Sundays.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2009 | Kenneth Turan
Orson Welles, at least in my house, is at the top of the list of great American directors, so the chance to see a selection of his key films on the big screen -- which is what's on tap for the American Cinematheque's Aero Theatre in Santa Monica -- is always welcome. The series, titled "Rogue Genius: An Orson Welles Retrospective," starts Wednesday with "Confidential Report/Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2008 | Dennis Lim, Special to The Times
A ROUTINE genre assignment that its beleaguered director turned into the most Shakespearean film noir of all time, "Touch of Evil" was primed to be Orson Welles' comeback, the movie that revived his Hollywood career after a long period in the wilderness. Instead, this 1958 masterpiece, a vision of human fallibility as grand as it is seedy, was the last film he made for a major studio. Welles was first hired not as director but as an actor, to play the villain in a Universal movie based on a pulp novel titled "Badge of Evil.
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