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OPINION
April 3, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
If you drive down Buckeye Road at the southern edge of Lima, Ohio, you'll pass an industrial complex where General Dynamics makes armored vehicles for the U.S. military. But if you stop and take a photograph, you just might find yourself detained by military police, have your camera confiscated and your digital photos deleted. Which is exactly what happened to two staffers for the Toledo Blade newspaper on Friday, in an unacceptable violation of the 1st Amendment and common sense. According to the Blade, staff writer Tyrel Linkhorn and photographer Jetta Fraser had just covered a news event at another Lima-area factory and decided to take photos of other businesses for future use, a common media practice.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 8, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
It's hard to get executions right. This week, the Supreme Court denied appeals by Louisiana and Missouri death row inmates who argued that they were entitled to know the source of the drugs with which they are to be executed, and that denial of that information compromises their right to due process. It's unclear why the court refused to hear the cases, but the underlying argument remains potent. Another challenge is underway in Oklahoma, where two inmates are seeking stays of execution because state officials have revised protocols on the fly as the lethal drugs they usually use have become more difficult to obtain.
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OPINION
March 20, 2013
It's a familiar story: Out of an exaggerated concern about potential election fraud, a state adopts procedures that have the effect of disenfranchising perfectly qualified voters. In this case, the state of Arizona is demanding that would-be voters provide proof of citizenship beyond what Congress has required. The Supreme Court, which heard arguments about Arizona's policy on Monday, should strike the requirement down. In 1993, Congress enacted the National Voter Registration Act, popularly known as the "motor voter" law because, among other provisions, it allows citizens to register to vote when they apply for a driver's license.
OPINION
April 3, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
If you drive down Buckeye Road at the southern edge of Lima, Ohio, you'll pass an industrial complex where General Dynamics makes armored vehicles for the U.S. military. But if you stop and take a photograph, you just might find yourself detained by military police, have your camera confiscated and your digital photos deleted. Which is exactly what happened to two staffers for the Toledo Blade newspaper on Friday, in an unacceptable violation of the 1st Amendment and common sense. According to the Blade, staff writer Tyrel Linkhorn and photographer Jetta Fraser had just covered a news event at another Lima-area factory and decided to take photos of other businesses for future use, a common media practice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
Legal residents who are not citizens would be able to serve as volunteer poll workers during California elections under legislation approved Monday by the state Senate. Assemblyman Rob Bonta (D-Alameda) introduced the measure to address a shortage of bilingual poll workers and increase civic engagement by residents who are ineligible to vote because they are not yet citizens. “As our country moves closer towards comprehensive immigration reform, it is important for states to create opportunities for lawful permanent residents to participate in our democratic process and encourage them to continue on the pathway towards citizenship," Bonta said.
WORLD
July 17, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
The flowing robes and abayas shrouding the people of the oil-rich United Arab Emirates can't hide the truth of a federation-wide weight problem. So the city of Dubai, famous for its opulent shopping centers and towering skyscrapers in the desert, on Friday will launch a public drive to get UAE residents on a diet, the Emirates24/7 website reports. The “Worth Your Weight in Gold” program will pay those who shed at least 2 kilograms in the next month - 4.4 pounds - the equivalent of $45 per kilo and give the top weight-losers a shot at a $5,000-plus jackpot.
OPINION
January 8, 2013
Re "On family plan," Jan. 4 Can someone please explain to me how someone born in the U.S. to non-citizens is automatically deemed to be an American citizen? I looked up the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, and Section I reads, "All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the state wherein they reside. " As I read it, being born here then going back to China or wherever certainly does not make one "subject to the jurisdiction thereof.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1994
I am sick and tired of seeing all the complaints and demonstrations of illegal aliens who (supposedly) can't get services or care. The truth is that people who are citizens of this country, who work 16 hours a day and still can't make it, are the ones who don't "qualify" for government assistance. Meanwhile, the illegal residents receive food, housing, shelter and education absolutely free, not to mention medical care. Why don't your articles tell the other side of the story? BELLA LEVEEN Camarillo
BUSINESS
December 28, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The Senate approved a five-year extension of a law that lets the government conduct electronic communication surveillance of suspected terrorists without obtaining a warrant. The bill reauthorizing the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, or FISA, passed by a vote of 73 to 23 early Friday. Passed by the House earlier this year, the measure now heads to President Obama, who is expected to sign it. Without the extension, FISA would expire Tuesday. The law allows the government to monitor phone calls, emails and other types of electronic communications between suspected terrorists and U.S. citizens.
SPORTS
February 5, 2014 | By David Wharton
SOCHI, Russia - With the opening ceremony scheduled for Friday, it seems that Russians have mixed feelings about hosting the 2014 Sochi Olympics. The RIA Novosti news agency reported that only 53% of the people polled by the Levada Center in Moscow believe their country did the right thing by bidding for the Games. Those in favor of the idea believe the massive sports competition will help unite the populace and improve the country's image. But 26% did not want the Games here. "Opportunity for graft" was the most common reason given.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores
In the wake of two controversial police shootings, Anaheim is launching a pilot citizens review board that would help monitor the city's Police Department. The nine-member board, appointed by the city manager, will be selected using a lottery system with representatives coming from four neighborhood council areas. The panel will provide recommendations to city officials, issue annual reports and conduct community outreach, according to the staff report. City Manager Marcie Edwards said she expects to have board members in place by summer -- two years after residents took to the streets in protest after the fatal shootings of Manuel Diaz and Joel Acevedo.
OPINION
February 12, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Reports that the United States may target another U.S. citizen for death because of his alleged involvement in terrorism are troubling, especially in light of unanswered questions about the drone attack in Yemen in 2011 that killed the U.S.-born Anwar Awlaki. This time, the potential target is said to be in Pakistan. If the United States is again to deliberately take the life of one of its citizens without due process of law, leaders from the president on down must, at the very least, offer specific and credible proof that such action was absolutely necessary to prevent imminent attacks on Americans and that capturing the suspected terrorist was impossible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2014 | By Nita Lelyveld
You could try to do it with speeches. You could try to do it with laws. Or you could go grass-roots with glue sticks, markers and red hearts. How do you bring the people of a big city together? Big Sunday prefers the making-friends-while-making-valentines approach. The nonprofit, which aims to build community through service, is best known for one big weekend a year when thousands of volunteers fan out to hundreds of projects. But how to keep all those people feeling part of something bigger than themselves all year long?
SPORTS
February 5, 2014 | By David Wharton
SOCHI, Russia - With the opening ceremony scheduled for Friday, it seems that Russians have mixed feelings about hosting the 2014 Sochi Olympics. The RIA Novosti news agency reported that only 53% of the people polled by the Levada Center in Moscow believe their country did the right thing by bidding for the Games. Those in favor of the idea believe the massive sports competition will help unite the populace and improve the country's image. But 26% did not want the Games here. "Opportunity for graft" was the most common reason given.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2014 | By Randall Roberts
Pete Seeger was best known as a folk singer, an archivist and writer, and the purveyor of such beamed-from-the-heavens standards as "We Shall Overcome," "If I Had a Hammer" and "Turn, Turn, Turn. " But among the musician's most important roles was one that's often overlooked: that of an American citizen who understood the power of song to serve as messenger, as Trojan horse, as lightning rod. It's hard to imagine a song steering and stirring more than "We Shall Overcome. " The work long ago became less the domain of Seeger, who helped popularize it when he published it in "People's Songs," than a sacred text owned by anyone longing for justice.
NATIONAL
January 22, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON - Texas executed a Mexican citizen late Wednesday despite objections from Mexico, a former Texas governor and U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry. Edgar Tamayo Arias, 46, was put to death at 9:32 p.m. Central time for killing a Houston police officer in 1994, according to Jason Clark, a spokesman for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice. Tamayo made no last statement, Clark said. Tamayo's attorneys fought until the last minute to save his life, appealing to the U.S. Supreme Court for a stay of execution.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2010
Seth Morris of "Curb Your Enthusiasm" and special guest Rob Huebel of "I Love You, Man" (filling in for Ed Helms) transform into their puppet alter egos to host this comedic live talk show. Guests perform, then chat with the felt hosts. Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre, 5919 Franklin Ave. 10 p.m. Sat. $8. (323) 908-8702. www.ucbtheatre.com.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1987
Oberg's article on putting common citizens in space is about as good idea as placing an actor in the White House. Is this guy lost in space? JOHN C. YOUNG Covina
NATIONAL
January 21, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
HOUSTON - A Mexican national facing execution in Texas this week has drawn support from Mexican officials, a former Texas governor and U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry, who appealed to Gov. Rick Perry and state courts for a reprieve - so far, unsuccessfully. Edgar Tamayo, 46, a Mexican citizen, is scheduled to be put to death Wednesday for fatally shooting Houston Police Officer Guy Gaddis in 1994. Gaddis, 24, had been flagged down near a nightclub by a man who accused Tamayo of robbing him. The officer arrested Tamayo, handcuffed him and put him in the back of his patrol car. The officer was driving away when Tamayo drew a pistol he had concealed and shot Gaddis three times in the back of the head.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2014 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Few regions were hit harder by the Great Recession than the Inland Empire, where foreclosures turned neighborhoods into ghost towns and real estate projects dissolved into weeds and broken dreams. So it's not surprising that four of the five largest banks in the region failed, sunk by risky subprime mortgages and failed construction loans. Citizens Business Bank was the exception. The bank, operated by holding company CVB Financial Corp., limited construction and land development loans to no more than 10% of its portfolio, far less than many of its peers.
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