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Citizens Thrift Loan

BUSINESS
March 9, 1999 | Daryl Strickland
Although two subsidiaries of Dallas-based FirstPlus Financial Group filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy recently, the move will not affect the Tustin-based banking affiliate, the lender's president said Monday. The two divisions, FirstPlus Financial Inc. and FirstPlus Special Funding Corp., have filed for protection from creditors. But FirstPlus Bank is "well capitalized and very profitable," said president Mike McGuire, adding that the bank has $246 million in deposits.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1992 | AJOWA IFATEYO
A man brandishing a phony remote-control bomb walked into a Citizens Thrift & Loan office on Monday afternoon and robbed it of an undisclosed amount of money, authorities said. The FBI believes that the robber, described as a white male 45 to 55 years of age with a grizzled mustache, is the same man who last Thursday robbed a Security Pacific National Bank in Downey using a similar technique. On Monday he departed in a late-model, silver-gray Cadillac.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1997 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A fast-growing Dallas finance company that agreed two weeks ago to buy a Tustin thrift and loan said Tuesday it has acquired a Laguna Hills mortgage banker in a stock swap. RAC Financial Group Inc. said it bought Capital Direct Funding Group Inc. and will operate the company as a separate subsidiary. RAC wouldn't disclose the value of the stock.
REAL ESTATE
August 25, 1991 | DAVID W. MYERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Would you like to fix up your house or condominium, but you don't have enough equity to qualify for a loan? If so, an FHA "Title I" home-improvement loan can help. Any credit-worthy person can borrow up to $17,500 under the little-known program. Although the loans are insured by the Federal Housing Administration, they're actually made by FHA-approved banks, savings and loans, credit unions, mortgage bankers and mortgage brokers.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1995 | DON LEE and DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
S outhern Californians are taking on increasing loads of debt this year, boosting their balances on everything from credit cards to personal loans to equity lines. Experts worry that consumer debt is being pushed to alarming new levels, leaving consumers vulnerable if there is a serious economic downturn. The trend especially affects the housing market. Bad credit or meager savings make it hard for first-time buyers to achieve the American dream of homeownership.
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