Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCitrus Industry
IN THE NEWS

Citrus Industry

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2011 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
By the time he was 16 in 1936, Sam Perricone was picking and packing lemons in Corona and Riverside and then hauling them to Los Angeles in his small pickup truck to sell at the Grand Central Market. Perricone, who became a giant of the citrus industry, died of congestive heart failure July 8 at Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian in Newport Beach, said his daughter Lucy Perricone. He was 91. A resident of the Orange County community of Sunset Beach, Perricone owned or was a partner in approximately 25 businesses related to agriculture.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 3, 2013 | By David Pierson
California's $2-billion citrus industry is bracing for an Arctic chill later this week that could wreak havoc across the San Joaquin Valley. Temperatures are expected to reach lows of around 30 degrees in the Fresno area starting Thursday and last several days. Citrus growers are preparing to soak their groves with water to raise ground temperatures. Farmers are also readying wind machines to circulate the warm air if necessary. “Citrus will be the main crop under threat,” said Dave Kranz, a spokesman for the California Farm Bureau Federation.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
August 26, 2009 | Jerry Hirsch
The discovery in Santa Ana of a tiny insect that typically carries a tree-killing disease has brought California's $1.6-billion citrus industry one step closer to an agricultural disaster, experts said. State agricultural officials said Tuesday that they recently trapped five adult Asian citrus psyllids on a lemon tree at a home in Santa Ana. They have sent the insects off to a lab to see whether they carry the bacteria that causes citrus greening, a disease that has ravaged groves in Florida and wiped out much of the citrus industries in China, India, Saudi Arabia, Egypt and Brazil.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2012 | By Rosanna Xia, Los Angeles Times
Area homeowners are responding to agricultural officials' call to action to help save the state's $2-billion citrus industry and their beloved backyard trees from a bacterium that the Citrus Research Board has referred to as "a death sentence for California citrus. " About 100 worried homeowners buzzed with questions during an information session last week in the San Gabriel Valley. State agricultural inspectors have enacted a quarantine in a five-mile radius around the neighborhood where Huanglongbing, or yellow dragon disease, was first confirmed March 30 in a citrus tree in Hacienda Heights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2001 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John V. Newman, a longtime Ventura County citrus grower and businessman who was the founding president of the Council of California Growers as well as a longtime chairman of Sunkist Growers Inc., has died. He was 91. Newman, who also served from 1973 to 1977 as chairman of the board of the Irvine Co., the giant Orange County-based development and investment firm, died of congestive heart failure Aug. 23 at his home in Westlake Village.
NATIONAL
August 25, 2005 | John-Thor Dahlburg, Times Staff Writer
For more than 40 years, grapefruit grew juicy and ripe on this 1,200-acre grove inland from the Atlantic. Now there is little left but the jagged branches of torn-up trees, and spicy smoke fills the hot midday air as one by one, they are burned to powdery ash. "This just makes me sick," said John E. Quigley II, an environmental supervisor with the Florida Bureau of Pest Eradication and Control, who looked on as flames at least 15 feet high consumed yet another grapefruit tree.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2012 | By Rosanna Xia, Los Angeles Times
Area homeowners are responding to agricultural officials' call to action to help save the state's $2-billion citrus industry and their beloved backyard trees from a bacterium that the Citrus Research Board has referred to as "a death sentence for California citrus. " About 100 worried homeowners buzzed with questions during an information session last week in the San Gabriel Valley. State agricultural inspectors have enacted a quarantine in a five-mile radius around the neighborhood where Huanglongbing, or yellow dragon disease, was first confirmed March 30 in a citrus tree in Hacienda Heights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1999 | PATRICK GRAHAM, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Art Freeman knows his years are numbered as a citrus grower. Freeman owns and tends a 300-acre spread of lush green groves some 20 miles east of downtown Phoenix, far removed from the urban sprawl. But that may not be the case much longer. The development that has swallowed up so much of the surrounding desert is steadily advancing on the farm he established 30 years ago. "Farming is done here, but we have no place to go," he lamented. "We don't fit in anymore."
BUSINESS
January 12, 1990 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nothing has had more impact on the orange juice industry in Brazil than the Florida thermometer. When it registered freezing temperatures in 1962, it made juice processors look south for oranges. They found Sao Paulo. When it heralded another tree-killing freeze in 1977, it handed Brazil an estimated 50% of the U.S. juice market for the first time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2011 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
By the time he was 16 in 1936, Sam Perricone was picking and packing lemons in Corona and Riverside and then hauling them to Los Angeles in his small pickup truck to sell at the Grand Central Market. Perricone, who became a giant of the citrus industry, died of congestive heart failure July 8 at Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian in Newport Beach, said his daughter Lucy Perricone. He was 91. A resident of the Orange County community of Sunset Beach, Perricone owned or was a partner in approximately 25 businesses related to agriculture.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2010 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
An insect known to carry a disease that has been devastating to Florida's citrus industry has been found in a bug trap in a citrus grove in Ventura County. The Asian citrus psyllid, which is the size of a fruit fly, feeds on the leaves of lemon and orange trees. It is also known to carry citrus greening disease, also called Huanglongbing or HLB, that ruins the taste of citrus fruit and juice and then kills the trees. The disease does not affect humans. This is the first time an Asian citrus psyllid has been found in Ventura County, a key producer of California citrus.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2010 | By Mary Forgione
Ann Thompson still marvels at the sliver of ranchland she has lived on for the last eight years. "I fell in love with the house," she says of the Spanish Colonial-style home known as the DeWenter Mansion that sits in the quiet foothills of La Verne. "For my husband, it was the property. " Thompson is the most recent resident of an enduring landmark that recalls the heyday of the orange and lemon industry that brought millions of dollars to La Verne in the early 20th century. Many of the original citrus trees still surround the house at this onetime ranch.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2009 | Jerry Hirsch
A tiny insect that threatens California's $1.6-billion citrus industry has been found near one of the state's commercial citrus growing regions. The Asian citrus psyllid, which has ravaged orchards in Florida as well as overseas, was found in Valley Center in rural San Diego County, the closest the bug has come to a major concentration of citrus groves. Northern San Diego County has about 2,500 acres of commercial citrus trees and is home to the largest concentration of organic citrus farmers in the nation, which will complicate efforts to control the insect, said Ted Batkin, president of the Citrus Research Board.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2009 | Jerry Hirsch
An international coalition of citrus farming and agriculture officials are launching a cross-border plan to suppress the march of a tiny insect that threatens California's $1.6-billion citrus industry. The insect often carries a disease that kills citrus trees and has ravaged orchards both in Florida and overseas. Following a series of meetings in Monterrey, Mexico, this week, the coalition said today that the nations agreed to work together to develop strategies to hold down the population of the insect, impose quarantines on the movements of plants and conduct more tests to see how the disease is spreading.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2009 | Esmeralda Bermudez
It's the stuff professional bug trappers dream of. As he peered at the first fly trap of the day, Ignacio Velazquez spotted his mottled foe, wriggling frantically under the magnifying lens. "I think I actually found one," said the 13-year veteran of the state's Department of Food and Agriculture, a hint of caution in his voice. "At this point, we'd call it a suspect." With 10,000 traps set statewide and about 200 trappers on the prowl, it was a needle-in-a-haystack discovery for Velazquez, an agriculture technician hunting for crop-destroying psyllids in the fruit-tree-lush neighborhood of Echo Park.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1989 | From Reuters
Just a few years ago, when icicles hung from Florida's fruit trees and strange spots sprouted on their leaves, there were doubts whether the state's citrus industry would survive the decade. But despite the losses of millions of trees to wintry weather and disease, growers now are gearing up for a bumper crop that is expected to herald growth and prosperity in the 1990s.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2009 | Jerry Hirsch
Another discovery of a tiny disease-carrying insect disclosed by state agriculture officials today demonstrates that California's citrus industry is fighting a war on two fronts. TheCalifornia Department of Food and Agriculture said a detection dog working with inspectors on Wednesday found a package at a FedEx depot in Sacramento that contained at least 100 live Asian citrus psyllids, including juveniles and adults. Officials find that the insect is making its way into the state as a passenger on packages, even as colonies of the bug establish themselves in Southern California after flying north from Mexico.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|