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Citrus Industry

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2005 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Homer D. Chapman once quipped that "the only experience I'd had before with citrus was oranges in the Christmas stocking." Chapman, whose initial citrus experience came as a small boy in Wisconsin during the first decade of the 20th century, grew up to make substantial contributions to citrus nutrition and soils research -- work that added to the economic growth of the citrus industry in California and around the world.
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BUSINESS
May 26, 1988 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
Sunkist Growers, responding to increased competition in the citrus industry, said Wednesday that it is slashing 66 jobs from a full-time work force of 460--including 30 at the cooperative's Sherman Oaks headquarters. The move is part of a cost-control program to trim more than $7 million in overhead by Oct. 31, the end of Sunkist's fiscal year, President Russell L. Hanlin told about 500 Ventura County grower members who gathered at Camarillo Grove County Park for a midyear review.
WORLD
December 22, 2008 | Chris Kraul
By the time orange grower Gabriel Simoes noticed symptoms of the incurable "greening" disease last year, it was too late to do anything about it. Now four of every five trees in his 1,000-acre orchard are dead or dying. Industry officials say it's only a matter of time before California's $1.2-billion citrus industry is threatened by the "mother of all citrus diseases," which has invaded thousands of acres here in Brazil's citrus belt with sickening speed.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2008 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
A tiny insect capable of carrying a disease that could devastate California's $1.2-billion citrus industry has been found in a lemon tree in San Diego, state agriculture officials said Friday. The identification of the bug as an Asian citrus psyllid in San Diego is preliminary, pending confirmation at a U.S. Department of Agriculture lab in Washington, officials said. The Asian citrus psyllid has become the primary carrier of citrus greening disease in Florida, where it has killed thousands of acres of orange groves, endangering that state's ranking as the largest U.S. producer of orange juice.
FOOD
January 10, 2001 | DAVID KARP
Most people won't read James Saunt's "Citrus Varieties of the World--Second Edition" (Sinclair International, $60) at a sitting, but it's more than a reference work. If you like citrus, it's fun to browse through, and it's the book if you're wondering what those big freaky lemons on the tree in the yard might be (Ponderosa); what's the difference between Mexican and Key limes (none); or what a bergamot is (cross of sour orange and sweet lime, used in perfumes and tea).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1998 | JENNIFER HAMM
The U.S. Department of Agriculture has approved a four-month delay on action concerning the importation of Argentine citrus, signaling a victory for Ventura County lemon growers. The USDA imposed the delay to consider ways to ensure that imported fruit does not contain medflies or other citrus pests. "We must make sure that we protect the California citrus industry from the medfly, citrus cancer, black spots, sweet orange scab and other pests and diseases," Rep.
NEWS
May 22, 1994 | IKE FLORES, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A microscopic Asian moth, the newest threat to Florida's citrus industry, is puzzling scientists and worrying growers. The citrus leafminer somehow hitchhiked into the Miami area almost a year ago and quickly established itself in much of Florida's 790,000-acre citrus belt. Officials believe it traveled to Florida from China, Thailand or Australia in a cargo shipment or in travelers' luggage. The insect derives its name from its habit of boring into leaves and then "mining" them for food.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2009 | Esmeralda Bermudez
It's the stuff professional bug trappers dream of. As he peered at the first fly trap of the day, Ignacio Velazquez spotted his mottled foe, wriggling frantically under the magnifying lens. "I think I actually found one," said the 13-year veteran of the state's Department of Food and Agriculture, a hint of caution in his voice. "At this point, we'd call it a suspect." With 10,000 traps set statewide and about 200 trappers on the prowl, it was a needle-in-a-haystack discovery for Velazquez, an agriculture technician hunting for crop-destroying psyllids in the fruit-tree-lush neighborhood of Echo Park.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2009 | Jerry Hirsch
A tiny insect that threatens California's $1.6-billion citrus industry has been found near one of the state's commercial citrus growing regions. The Asian citrus psyllid, which has ravaged orchards in Florida as well as overseas, was found in Valley Center in rural San Diego County, the closest the bug has come to a major concentration of citrus groves. Northern San Diego County has about 2,500 acres of commercial citrus trees and is home to the largest concentration of organic citrus farmers in the nation, which will complicate efforts to control the insect, said Ted Batkin, president of the Citrus Research Board.
SPORTS
June 21, 1989 | Mike Downey
It finally happened. I warned the boss it would happen, and it happened. We had a big argument about this, and he won. He won because he's the boss. But, let's see what the boss does now, and I don't mean Bruce Springsteen. Our argument began when a certain banking concern in California paid a pretty penny to buy an interest in a certain arena that is used for Laker basketball, King hockey, Lazer soccer, boxing, volleyball, tennis, various concerts and Ice Capade, Snoopy on Skates-type things.
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