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City Lights

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NEWS
April 30, 1991 | BETTY GOODWIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I have a message for my dad," Jane Chaplin said in a shaky voice from the podium of UCLA's Royce Hall Sunday night. "I love you very much and I'm thinking of you. And welcome home." The screening of Charlie Chaplin's film classic, "City Lights," with score performed live by the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra under the direction of Carl Davis, was an emotional experience. People exited the theater awed by Chaplin, the ultimate hyphenate: star-writer-director-composer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Susan King
Albert Dupontel is a popular French comedy actor and film director whose heroes are Charlie Chaplin and "Monty Python's Flying Circus. " Katell Quillévéré, one of the France's up-and-coming filmmakers, lists among her influences Douglas Sirk and John Cassavetes. Dupontel and Quillévéré are making their first appearance at the City of Lights, City of Angels film festival, which will showcase the diversity of contemporary French cinema at the Directors Guild of America in Los Angeles through Monday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2004 | Ann Conway, Times Staff Writer
He came for the free removal of tattoos. He left with hope. Since then, Marco Munguia -- ex-gang member, drug addict, convict -- has become a volunteer counselor at the facility he says saved him from "life imprisonment or death": the Southern California Counseling Center. "When I went to the center to have my tattoos removed, there was so much pain in me, I felt like a throwaway citizen," the 31-year-old said at the center's May 20 awards dinner at the Beverly Hilton hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2014 | By Susan King
The 18th City of Lights, City of Angels French film festival, which takes place April 21-28 at the Directors Guild of America, will present 41 feature films including three international premieres, 17 North American or U.S. premieres and 16 West Coast premieres. COLCOA, which is presented by the Franco-American Cultural Fund, will also include 20 new shorts, restoration premieres of classic French films such as Jean Cocteau's 1946 "Beauty and the Beast" and a tribute to the seminal New Wave director Francois Truffaut with a special program and a screening of his 1977 film, "The Man Who Loved Women.
MAGAZINE
April 22, 2007 | Lynell George, Lynell George is a senior writer for West.
All this was before--before Adler Alley had been rechristened Kerouac, before the Condor Club tossed its kitschy sign (complete with stripper Carol Doda's flashing red pasties) and long before anyone, anywhere, would have the temerity to open a "Beat Museum."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1996 | From Associated Press
Virginia Cherrill Martini, a former wife of Cary Grant whose acting debut came as a blind flower girl in Charlie Chaplin's silent classic "City Lights," has died. She was 88. Martini died late Thursday at a hospital in Santa Barbara. She was in few movies after the 1931 classic and stopped acting after marrying Grant in 1933. She met Grant at the premiere of "Blonde Venus," in which he had the lead. Their two-year marriage ended in divorce. Born on a farm in Carthage, Ill.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1998 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Had things gone as originally planned, symphony-goers would have encountered a fount of Russian angst and seminal cinema last week in Thousand Oaks. As it turned out, instead of a performance of Shostakovich's score to Eisenstein's silent film classic "Battleship Potemkin," the New West Symphony substituted the lighter fare of Charlie Chaplin's "City Lights." The upshot: pure joy, and a lesson in the beauties of simplicity and virtuosic rhythm.
TRAVEL
February 3, 2002 | EILEEN OGINTZ
Enough nesting! Get off the couch! Turn off the TV and the computer. Grab the kids and head for the city lights. Wherever you live, there's nothing like a winter weekend to explore museums, historic sites, zoos, aquariums, shops and theaters. Here's your chance to do something different with the kids and get a new perspective on a city you may already know well. Maybe they can hone their table manners by having tea in a fancy hotel or expand their taste buds at inexpensive ethnic eateries.
NEWS
January 22, 1996 | DAVID L. ULIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
City Lights Bookstore occupies a narrow triangle of space in North Beach, wedged between Broadway and Jack Kerouac Alley, across Columbus Avenue from the original site of A.P. Giannini's Bank of Italy. In a very real sense, it stands at the crossroads of this city--just a few hundred feet east of Chinatown's Grant Avenue and catty-corner to the Condor Club, where in 1969 Carol Doda became the first bottomless dancer in the United States.
NEWS
August 14, 2000 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like its rumpled poet-owner, the famed City Lights bookstore has always been a bit of an eccentric. Wedged into a cramped corner of Columbus Avenue, the shop founded by renowned Beat Generation poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti has an oddball pie-slice shape, slanted checkered floors and triangular rooms, not to mention slipshod lighting with wiring running every which way. "This is a wonderful old building," says Ferlinghetti, 81. "I love the place.
TRAVEL
March 30, 2014
Thank you, Pico Iyer ["Still Shining," March 23]. Brilliant article about City Lights Bookstore. I have made many a pilgrimage there since college and made sure my kids visited it too. Isn't it encouraging that it is still going strong? Happy birthday, Lawrence Ferlinghetti. I once saw you speak at the L.A. Times Festival of Books. Cynthia Fox Los Angeles :: The story about the City Lights Bookstore was perfectly delightful. What a joy to read a beautifully written piece, impeccably punctuated with nary a misspelled word, and sprinkled with enough multiple syllable words to perk up one's brain.
TRAVEL
March 21, 2014 | By Pico Iyer
SAN FRANCISCO - To get to one of the spiritual centers of San Francisco - a perfect microcosm of the city of evergreen revolutions - turn left after the high-rising office buildings downtown, saunter past Francis Ford Coppola's emerald-shaded seven-story American Zoetrope mock pagoda and halt just past the spot where Columbus Avenue meets Jack Kerouac Alley. Or perhaps approach the official historical landmark by way of Grant Avenue, at the heart of San Francisco's Chinatown, wander past a long line of slightly kitschy tourist shops displaying quotes from Lao Tse and Jimi Hendrix and try to ignore the eco-conscious green Hello Kittys in store windows.
SCIENCE
December 13, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
The Geminid meteor shower is peaking Friday night, and you won't want to miss it. It is one of the most prolific showers of the year -- and also one of the weirdest. Under perfect viewing conditions, skywatchers can hope to see 100 to 120 meteors per hour during the Geminid peak. Unfortunately, conditions are not perfect this year. The moon is getting close to full and its light wll block out some of the dimmer meteors.  But don't let that stop you from taking in the show. NASA says Geminid meteors are so bright that about half of them will still be visible even by the light of the moon.
SCIENCE
November 15, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Comet ISON is brightening, and if you look up to the sky around dawn, you just may be able to see it without a telescope or binoculars. "It kicked up its brightness like crazy in the past couple days," said Carey Lisse, coordinator of NASA's Comet ISON observing campaign. "We now have a naked-eye object. " As of Friday morning, astronomers around the world were reporting that the comet was around 4.8 magnitude. Most people can see stars that shine at fifth magnitude -- the lower the magnitude, the brighter the object.
TRAVEL
November 10, 2013 | By Brady MacDonald
Ah, Paris. The food. The art. The sights. The hotel bill. It was the little matter of finding a place to stay that kept an international vacation off our radar, especially in wake of a recession that had put a king-size crimp in our international travel plans. As we discussed a European getaway, we realized that a hotel stay for my wife, Nancy, our daughter, Hannah, and me would cost us as much as our airline tickets. I had read about house exchanges, but Nancy was hesitant to let strangers into our home, despite my continuing campaign about the savings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2013 | By Jason Wells
Not long after the Dodgers revived their standing in the National League Championship Series with a 3-0 victory Monday night over the St. Louis Cardinals, a call came down from the L.A. mayor's office: Flip the switch. And just like that, the tower of Los Angeles City Hall downtown was awash in blue light, and remained so into the early morning hours Tuesday. The lighting switch doesn't happen often. Since Mayor Eric Garcetti took office, it's happened only once -- for his inauguration.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
A box of tissues should be required equipment for those attending the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra's 14th annual Silent Film Gala on Saturday evening at UCLA's Royce Hall. This year the gala will be showing a new print of Charlie Chaplin's 1931 masterwork, "City Lights" -- one of cinema's all-time weepers. With Chaplin one of the best-loved and funniest screen comedians of the 20th century, it may be odd to think of a film of his causing audiences to cry uncontrollably.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2003 | Shawn Hubler, Times Staff Writer
The gallery where Allen Ginsberg first read his seminal poem "Howl" is now a rug store, and the Vesuvio Cafe draws more out-of-towners than bohemians. Taggers have misspelled Neal Cassady's name in Jack Kerouac Alley. The Cellar, where jazzmen backed poets in the 1950s, is just another restaurant basement. But for the most part, San Francisco does not turn loose of its heritage gently, and this year's case in point is the landmark bookstore at Broadway and Columbus Avenue.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2013 | By Alice Short
Patricia Engel sets her first novel in late '90s Paris, where recent college graduate Lita del Cielo arrives to take language classes for a year. It's a respite of sorts as she attempts to forestall the expectations of her Colombian immigrant parents, who arrived in the U.S. with nothing and built a Latin food empire in short order. Twenty-year-old Lita is to live in the House of Stars, a crumbling old mansion on the Left Bank. Her landlord, an elderly onetime countess named Séraphine, props herself up on a huge sleigh bed to receive visitors and dispense advice to the "well-bred debutante boarders" who have come to Paris to "study" but seem to spend most of their time in pursuit of love.
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