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City Manager John Lockwood

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NEWS
May 24, 1989
In an attempt to capture a piece of the state budget windfall, San Diego Mayor Maureen O'Connor and the City Council declared a "state of emergency" over the city's recent spate of drug- and gang-related shootings and asked Gov. George Deukmejian to give the city $34 million to help quell the violence. Deukmejian press secretary Kevin Brett, questioning whether O'Connor's unusual gambit was a publicity stunt, said that such declarations are traditionally reserved for natural disasters and predicted that the governor would reject the request out of hand.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1991 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former San Diego City Manager John Lockwood said Saturday that he deliberately kept secret a $100,000 payment to a city employee who had filed a complaint against her boss, the city planning director, with whom she had developed a personal relationship. Planning chief Robert Spaulding resigned from his post under pressure Friday after word of the complaint and subsequent settlement leaked out, prompting Mayor Maureen O'Connor to demand his departure.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1989
The San Diego City Council on Monday authorized two studies to determine the proposed new civic center's impact on traffic and the environment. The council voted, 7 to 2, to spend $40,630 for an environmental impact analysis and $19,370 for a traffic impact analysis. The money is in addition to the $1.2 million already spent to purchase a parcel of property needed for the project and $200,000 for the work of consultants and city staff, said Deputy City Manager Maureen Stapleton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1990
Beeb Salzer makes many important points in his commentary ("Budget Blade Poised Again to Slice Arts Funding," March 4) defending city funds for the arts. I agree that artists and artwork help make San Diego a better place to live and work, with benefits far beyond mere bolstering of the city's image. But in urging arts leaders to lobby against any cuts, Professor Salzer contributes to the posturing that has polarized the budget shortfall facing the city. As an example, Professor Salzer lumps my moderate proposal for mild tax and fee increases and carefully planned budget cuts with the more Draconian series of cuts likely unless the City Council changes course.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1986
Because of my great respect for the burdens faced by our City Council, I hesitate to criticize Councilwoman Judy McCarty for taking an ax to City Manager John Lockwood's thorough and professional report on L'Affair Kolender. Her proper approach would have been internal discussion with her colleagues and the mayor, if she was unhappy with the Lockwood report. The mayor or deputy mayor could have scheduled a conference with Lockwood. If she's unhappy with the Lockwood performance, she is welcome to seek council support for his ouster (fat chance of that . . . council persons and citizens are still dancing in the street over having John Lockwood take the "hot seat" of being city manager)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1990
Beeb Salzer makes many important points in his commentary ("Budget Blade Poised Again to Slice Arts Funding," March 4) defending city funds for the arts. I agree that artists and artwork help make San Diego a better place to live and work, with benefits far beyond mere bolstering of the city's image. But in urging arts leaders to lobby against any cuts, Professor Salzer contributes to the posturing that has polarized the budget shortfall facing the city. As an example, Professor Salzer lumps my moderate proposal for mild tax and fee increases and carefully planned budget cuts with the more Draconian series of cuts likely unless the City Council changes course.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1988
I have been appalled the past few days to watch San Diego's new ploy to get higher taxes. City Manager John Lockwood says the city needs new taxes to hire more police officers. In 1984, the City Council adopted a goal of having more police officers--two per 1,000 city residents--but, since that time, little progress has been made. The city spent lots of new money, but not on police. The city found an extra $4 million for the budget of a newly created "Commission for Arts and Culture."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1989 | GENE YASUDA, Times Staff Writer
In a special appearance Tuesday, the presiding judge of Superior Court persuaded the Board of Supervisors to proceed with a plan for more downtown courtrooms that had been placed in jeopardy by a decision to spend $5 million on East County courtrooms. During preliminary hearings Tuesday on the 1989-90 county budget, Judge Michael Greer vigorously urged supervisors to pursue plans to lease nine courtrooms in downtown San Diego to help reduce trial backlogs. In an unexpected move on Monday, the supervisors had voted to build four courtrooms in El Cajon, leading to speculation that the downtown expansion would be scrapped.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1989 | ARMANDO ACUNA, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian on Tuesday formally rejected Mayor Maureen O'Connor's unorthodox request to declare a "state of emergency" and give San Diego $34 million to fight gang- and drug-related violence. The governor had been highly skeptical of the proposal since it was unveiled in a surprise move by the mayor and the City Council in late May, when a spate of shootings caused them to declare a crime crisis. Deukmejian's aides had criticized the tactic as a publicity stunt by the mayor, and Tuesday's response from the governor, in a 2 1/2-page letter to O'Connor, was anticlimactic.
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | LORI GRANGE, Times Staff Writer
For the past 27 years or so, Mission Bay Park, a former swampland turned aquatic resort, has been the pride and joy of San Diego's summer attractions. About 14 million visitors each year bask in its 4,600 acres of land and water; about 2,500 boaters now have their skiffs and yachts stationed in its marinas. But Mother Nature has not been impressed. Storms, high tides, powerful waves from winds and boats and the continuous lapping of water against land have significantly eroded the bay's shoreline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1989 | GENE YASUDA, Times Staff Writer
In a special appearance Tuesday, the presiding judge of Superior Court persuaded the Board of Supervisors to proceed with a plan for more downtown courtrooms that had been placed in jeopardy by a decision to spend $5 million on East County courtrooms. During preliminary hearings Tuesday on the 1989-90 county budget, Judge Michael Greer vigorously urged supervisors to pursue plans to lease nine courtrooms in downtown San Diego to help reduce trial backlogs. In an unexpected move on Monday, the supervisors had voted to build four courtrooms in El Cajon, leading to speculation that the downtown expansion would be scrapped.
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | LORI GRANGE, Times Staff Writer
For the past 27 years or so, Mission Bay Park, a former swampland turned aquatic resort, has been the pride and joy of San Diego's summer attractions. About 14 million visitors each year bask in its 4,600 acres of land and water; about 2,500 boaters now have their skiffs and yachts stationed in its marinas. But Mother Nature has not been impressed. Storms, high tides, powerful waves from winds and boats and the continuous lapping of water against land have significantly eroded the bay's shoreline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1989 | ARMANDO ACUNA, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian on Tuesday formally rejected Mayor Maureen O'Connor's unorthodox request to declare a "state of emergency" and give San Diego $34 million to fight gang- and drug-related violence. The governor had been highly skeptical of the proposal since it was unveiled in a surprise move by the mayor and the City Council in late May, when a spate of shootings caused them to declare a crime crisis. Deukmejian's aides had criticized the tactic as a publicity stunt by the mayor, and Tuesday's response from the governor, in a 2 1/2-page letter to O'Connor, was anticlimactic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1989
The San Diego City Council on Monday authorized two studies to determine the proposed new civic center's impact on traffic and the environment. The council voted, 7 to 2, to spend $40,630 for an environmental impact analysis and $19,370 for a traffic impact analysis. The money is in addition to the $1.2 million already spent to purchase a parcel of property needed for the project and $200,000 for the work of consultants and city staff, said Deputy City Manager Maureen Stapleton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1989 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN and RICHARD A. SERRANO, Times Staff Writers
Two days after declaring that drug- and gang-related violence had created a "state of emergency," the San Diego City Council on Thursday ordered City Manager John Lockwood to find the money in next year's budget to add 140 police officers and two police substations. The 9-0 council vote will require Lockwood to cut $10 million from other city departments to pay for the new officers and 46 support personnel needed to back them up. Even more cuts would be required to acquire land and begin designing the substations, which could cost as much as $3.5 million apiece, and to hire city attorneys and communications personnel to augment the beefed-up police force, Lockwood said.
NEWS
May 24, 1989
In an attempt to capture a piece of the state budget windfall, San Diego Mayor Maureen O'Connor and the City Council declared a "state of emergency" over the city's recent spate of drug- and gang-related shootings and asked Gov. George Deukmejian to give the city $34 million to help quell the violence. Deukmejian press secretary Kevin Brett, questioning whether O'Connor's unusual gambit was a publicity stunt, said that such declarations are traditionally reserved for natural disasters and predicted that the governor would reject the request out of hand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1989 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN and RICHARD A. SERRANO, Times Staff Writers
Two days after declaring that drug- and gang-related violence had created a "state of emergency," the San Diego City Council on Thursday ordered City Manager John Lockwood to find the money in next year's budget to add 140 police officers and two police substations. The 9-0 council vote will require Lockwood to cut $10 million from other city departments to pay for the new officers and 46 support personnel needed to back them up. Even more cuts would be required to acquire land and begin designing the substations, which could cost as much as $3.5 million apiece, and to hire city attorneys and communications personnel to augment the beefed-up police force, Lockwood said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1991 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former San Diego City Manager John Lockwood said Saturday that he deliberately kept secret a $100,000 payment to a city employee who had filed a complaint against her boss, the city planning director, with whom she had developed a personal relationship. Planning chief Robert Spaulding resigned from his post under pressure Friday after word of the complaint and subsequent settlement leaked out, prompting Mayor Maureen O'Connor to demand his departure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1988
I have been appalled the past few days to watch San Diego's new ploy to get higher taxes. City Manager John Lockwood says the city needs new taxes to hire more police officers. In 1984, the City Council adopted a goal of having more police officers--two per 1,000 city residents--but, since that time, little progress has been made. The city spent lots of new money, but not on police. The city found an extra $4 million for the budget of a newly created "Commission for Arts and Culture."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1986
Because of my great respect for the burdens faced by our City Council, I hesitate to criticize Councilwoman Judy McCarty for taking an ax to City Manager John Lockwood's thorough and professional report on L'Affair Kolender. Her proper approach would have been internal discussion with her colleagues and the mayor, if she was unhappy with the Lockwood report. The mayor or deputy mayor could have scheduled a conference with Lockwood. If she's unhappy with the Lockwood performance, she is welcome to seek council support for his ouster (fat chance of that . . . council persons and citizens are still dancing in the street over having John Lockwood take the "hot seat" of being city manager)
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