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ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1988 | LIBBY SLATE
Simon Rattle may be a world-class conductor of world-class orchestras, but he is also unpretentious enough to preface an at-home morning interview by making his own pot of coffee. "I'm no good till I've had my second cup," he said with a smile. Then sitting at the cozy but cramped kitchen table, he asks, "Would you mind if we stayed here to talk?"
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2009 | By MARK SWED, Music Critic
In April 1989, the glamorously autocratic Herbert von Karajan resigned from his post as music director of the Berlin Philharmonic, the West German ensemble he had led for 35 years and made into the most brilliant orchestra the world had ever known. In July, he died. On Nov. 9, the Berlin Wall came down. Then, on Christmas Day, Leonard Bernstein, Karajan's old rival, summoned orchestra members from Munich, Dresden, Leningrad, Paris and New York to the once and future capital of Germany for the official concert celebrating the fall of the wall -- a historic performance of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1987 | MARC SHULGOLD
Whenever Simon Rattle talks about music, his expressive eyes widen in enthusiasm, and it's all he can do to remain seated. You might think this boyish-looking conductor would be miserable away from the podium for any length of time. You would be wrong. The curly-haired Briton is certainly devoted to his art. But he's more devoted to his family: to his wife, the American soprano Elise Ross, and his son Alexander (Sasha), now 3.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1999 | MARK SWED
A week and a half ago, Ades won the Gravemeyer Award for "Asyla," and the music world is all in a state. It's not that this 22-minute symphony isn't worthy or that it is the composer's first major orchestral piece. "Asyla" is the freshest of new music, full of inventive sounds and revealing an instantly identifiable personality. No, the controversy is simply that Ades is only 28 years old, and the $200,000 prize is often regarded as a Nobel-like lifetime achievement award.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2009 | By MARK SWED, Music Critic
In April 1989, the glamorously autocratic Herbert von Karajan resigned from his post as music director of the Berlin Philharmonic, the West German ensemble he had led for 35 years and made into the most brilliant orchestra the world had ever known. In July, he died. On Nov. 9, the Berlin Wall came down. Then, on Christmas Day, Leonard Bernstein, Karajan's old rival, summoned orchestra members from Munich, Dresden, Leningrad, Paris and New York to the once and future capital of Germany for the official concert celebrating the fall of the wall -- a historic performance of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1999 | MARK SWED
A week and a half ago, Ades won the Gravemeyer Award for "Asyla," and the music world is all in a state. It's not that this 22-minute symphony isn't worthy or that it is the composer's first major orchestral piece. "Asyla" is the freshest of new music, full of inventive sounds and revealing an instantly identifiable personality. No, the controversy is simply that Ades is only 28 years old, and the $200,000 prize is often regarded as a Nobel-like lifetime achievement award.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1998 | Mark Swed, Mark Swed is The Times' music critic
Once upon a time, back in the 1980s before Baroque singers marketed themselves as bimbos, before nubile young violinists posed for provocative CD covers, there were Nige and Nadja, the original bad boy and bad girl of the violin. First there was Nigel Kennedy the good boy. In 1984, still in his 20s, he recorded Elgar's outsize, rapturous 1910 Violin Concerto in a performance that spoke directly to traditionalist hearts. It was beautifully played, well controlled yet full of emotion.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1999 | MARK SWED
In 1962, when Glenn Gould performed the Brahms D-minor with Leonard Bernstein at a famously controversial concert in Carnegie Hall, the pianist was 30, the conductor, 44; and each was the most talented and original musician of his generation. Those are close to the ages today of Leif Ove Andsnes and Simon Rattle. And the comparisons of these two recordings, a quarter-century apart, are fascinating.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1999 | MARK SWED
The Berlin Philharmonic is about to get a wake-up call. The august orchestra has been led for much of the past century by Wilhelm Furtwangler, Herbert von Karajan and Claudio Abbado. But beginning in 2002, when Simon Rattle takes over, there will be a new kind of conductor for a new kind of city. And here is an example of what the former principal guest conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic and upcoming music director of the Ojai Festival (June 2000) is up to these days.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1992 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Cancellation: The British orchestra the City of Birmingham Symphony, which will tour the United States in April, has canceled its California engagements. According to Ernest Fleischmann, speaking for the Los Angeles Philharmonic Assn., which was to sponsor concerts by the orchestra at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, the ensemble did not receive the sponsorship that had been anticipated and therefore does not have sufficient funds to travel to the West Coast.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1999 | MARK SWED
The Berlin Philharmonic is about to get a wake-up call. The august orchestra has been led for much of the past century by Wilhelm Furtwangler, Herbert von Karajan and Claudio Abbado. But beginning in 2002, when Simon Rattle takes over, there will be a new kind of conductor for a new kind of city. And here is an example of what the former principal guest conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic and upcoming music director of the Ojai Festival (June 2000) is up to these days.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1999 | MARK SWED
In 1962, when Glenn Gould performed the Brahms D-minor with Leonard Bernstein at a famously controversial concert in Carnegie Hall, the pianist was 30, the conductor, 44; and each was the most talented and original musician of his generation. Those are close to the ages today of Leif Ove Andsnes and Simon Rattle. And the comparisons of these two recordings, a quarter-century apart, are fascinating.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1998 | Mark Swed, Mark Swed is The Times' music critic
Once upon a time, back in the 1980s before Baroque singers marketed themselves as bimbos, before nubile young violinists posed for provocative CD covers, there were Nige and Nadja, the original bad boy and bad girl of the violin. First there was Nigel Kennedy the good boy. In 1984, still in his 20s, he recorded Elgar's outsize, rapturous 1910 Violin Concerto in a performance that spoke directly to traditionalist hearts. It was beautifully played, well controlled yet full of emotion.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1988 | LIBBY SLATE
Simon Rattle may be a world-class conductor of world-class orchestras, but he is also unpretentious enough to preface an at-home morning interview by making his own pot of coffee. "I'm no good till I've had my second cup," he said with a smile. Then sitting at the cozy but cramped kitchen table, he asks, "Would you mind if we stayed here to talk?"
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1987 | MARC SHULGOLD
Whenever Simon Rattle talks about music, his expressive eyes widen in enthusiasm, and it's all he can do to remain seated. You might think this boyish-looking conductor would be miserable away from the podium for any length of time. You would be wrong. The curly-haired Briton is certainly devoted to his art. But he's more devoted to his family: to his wife, the American soprano Elise Ross, and his son Alexander (Sasha), now 3.
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