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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1998
For decades Valley residents have been complaining about the lack of city services, such as street cleaning. Petitions are circulating in an effort to get enough signatures to study the merits of secession because supposedly residents are fed up with the lack of services. Well guess what? Just recently new "No Parking for Street Cleaning" signs went up in a number of Valley neighborhoods. Many of us were delighted, after all these years, at the prospect of having clean streets and gutters once in awhile.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
When Mayor Eric Garcetti unveiled his first budget this week, he proudly announced that he was doubling funding to fix broken sidewalks from $10 million to $20 million. There's just one problem: None of the money that was budgeted for this year has been spent so far. And it remains unclear how much of it will be used before the budget year comes to an end June 30. Any unencumbered money will be swept back into Los Angeles' general fund. City officials said they held off on sidewalk spending because of a lawsuit filed by disabled residents who assert that broken sidewalks infringe on their rights to public access.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By David Zahniser and Emily Alpert Reyes
L.A.'s top budget official on Monday advised the city's elected leaders to resist the temptation to expand services, saying they should work toward eliminating a recurring deficit by 2018 instead. In a 37-page report, City Administrative Officer Miguel Santana said a rebounding economy and greater stability in the city's own finances have created new pressure to add or expand local government. He recommended that council members focus on other initiatives, such as reducing entry-level city salaries and securing new health-care concessions from the workforce.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By David Zahniser, Emily Alpert Reyes and Ben Welsh, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti on Monday unveiled a hold-the-line budget for the coming fiscal year, proposing modest increases in a handful of city services and zero reduction in the business tax -- an issue that the mayor repeatedly has promised to tackle. Garcetti's $8.1 billion financial proposal, which requires approval from the City Council, closes a $242 million gap in part by relying on increased tax revenue projections and reductions in vacant positions. The financial plan assumes the city's workforce, including police officers and firefighters, will not receive raises in the coming year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2012 | By Wesley Lowery, Los Angeles Times
The four candidates competing to replace outgoing Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa squared off in South Los Angeles on Friday, debating the respective roles that housing, education, city services and budget cuts play in the lives of area residents. The forum at the St. John's Well Child and Family Center was intended to focus on health issues in an area of the city where political power has moved steadily from black to Latino voters. However, the candidates' comments were wide-ranging.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2011 | By Melanie Hicken, Los Angeles Times
Glendale officials will introduce a budget next week that would slash millions in city services and serve several employees with pink slips. City Council members have indicated support for roughly $4 million in service cuts — including elimination of all programming at Deukmejian Wilderness Park and police-sponsored athletics programs for at-risk youth — as they try to fill a projected $18-million budget gap. "It's been a difficult year,...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2003 | From Times Staff Reports
Starting next month, Los Angeles residents will pay more for art classes, zoo admission, zoning permits and some other city services. The Los Angeles City Council voted without discussion Tuesday to increase more than 80 fees for the fiscal year starting July 1 to balance the city budget. Some fees that will increase: * Zoo admission, $9 for adults, up from $8.25; $4 for children, up from $3.25. * Planning Department applications and permits, up an average of 5%.
NEWS
April 29, 1993
Plain old human contact is the centerpiece of a new program aimed at making City Hall more open to West Hollywood residents. Greeters will meet residents attending meetings of the City Council and other city commissions and show them how to sign up to address the panels. The city cable television channel that broadcasts the meetings will show viewers an abbreviated agenda beforehand and live discussions of city issues during breaks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1990
A dozen east Wilmington businessmen joined this week in demanding that Los Angeles city departments do more to rid their neighborhood of crime, garbage and vagrants. "We're very disappointed with the service we're receiving from all branches of government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1988
The fiscal quandary in which the city of El Segundo finds itself should at least be instructive to others. A band of "development is always good" councilmen and landowners hoping to turn a fast buck have saddled our community with a passel of marginally occupied high-rises, traffic problems that will not go away, and a spate of large businesses that have assumed that the future will continue to be like it was under the former administration, a...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc
Voters in Long Beach went to the polls Tuesday to cast ballots for a new mayor, city attorney and most of the City Council, setting the stage for a potential shake-up  in city politics. The mayor's race has attracted much of the attention and much of the campaign money with a field of candidates that includes both political heavyweights and city insiders. If no candidate receives more than 50% of the vote, the top two vote-getters will meet in a June 3 runoff. After outgoing Mayor Bob Foster announced last year that he would not seek a third term, the race was thrown wide open, attracting contenders such as Assemblywoman Bonnie Lowenthal, Council members Robert Garcia and Gerrie Schipske, former NFL player and real estate investor Damon Dunn and Long Beach City College Trustee Doug Otto.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By David Zahniser and Emily Alpert Reyes
L.A.'s top budget official on Monday advised the city's elected leaders to resist the temptation to expand services, saying they should work toward eliminating a recurring deficit by 2018 instead. In a 37-page report, City Administrative Officer Miguel Santana said a rebounding economy and greater stability in the city's own finances have created new pressure to add or expand local government. He recommended that council members focus on other initiatives, such as reducing entry-level city salaries and securing new health-care concessions from the workforce.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - Councilman and mayoral candidate David Alvarez stood and applauded when acting Mayor Todd Gloria, in his state of the city address, proposed raising the minimum wage in San Diego beyond the scheduled statewide increases. Councilman Kevin Faulconer, Alvarez's opponent in the Feb. 11 election, remained seated, hands folded in his lap. He later told reporters that raising the minimum wage could be bad for business and lead to elimination of jobs. Differences over economic issues illustrate the divide between Alvarez, a Democrat, and Faulconer, a Republican, as the hurry-up campaign to find a successor to the disgraced Bob Filner enters its final stretch with prickly debates and dueling TV commercials.
OPINION
January 17, 2014 | By Robert Krol and Shirley Svorny
The recent report from the Los Angeles 2020 Commission paints a bleak picture for Los Angeles, with a laundry list of ills facing the city. Our concern is that the commission will recommend options, to come within 90 days, that mimic those of the past: policies that favor specific industries, aim for growth in only particular geographic areas, lend money to firms turned down by banks or target specific types of jobs. We can't say this firmly enough: An important objective must be to make adjustments that give investors security about the future of city services and tax rates.
NEWS
January 13, 2014 | By Patt Morrison
Mayor Eric Garcetti is getting to wield a pretty big broom, with vacancies everywhere from the DWP chief to choosing a new head of cultural affairs and the three city animal commissioners he just replaced. There is one post that was not going to be empty but has become so: the city's poet laureate. Its first, Eloise Klein Healy, chosen under Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa just over a year ago, resigned in September after falling ill with encephalitis, which left her with aphasia - a stunning theft for a poet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2013 | By Anh Do
The city of Los Angeles has filed a lawsuit against Bank of America, the third banking giant accused of mortgage discrimination in minority communities that in turn led to a wave of foreclosures, reduced property tax revenue and increased costs for city services. The city alleges that Bank of America "engaged in a continuous pattern and practice of mortgage discrimination in Los Angeles since at least 2004" by demanding different terms or conditions on loans that "vulnerable" borrowers could not afford, according to the complaint filed Friday in federal court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2013 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Ten weeks before he leaves office, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa on Monday offered a $7.7-billion budget that would begin reversing years of cuts to basic city services such as tree trimming and sidewalk repairs while avoiding employee layoffs and furloughs. Buoyed by an estimated $111-million uptick in revenue, Villaraigosa's spending plan for the coming year provides money to add 65 firefighters, purchase 533 new vehicles at the Los Angeles Police Department and trim an additional 35,000 trees - leaving the city on its most solid footing since it was engulfed in crisis five years ago. The mayor also offered a long-term blueprint for financial recovery that would require the city's elected officials to be far less generous to their public employees than he and the council were during his eight-year tenure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1997 | FRANK MESSINA
The City Council will look tonight at revamping the city's fee system for services ranging from crossing guards to building permits. With a study on the actual cost of city services in hand, the council will decide whether to hold the line by subsidizing fees, or to raise them. "The question is whether the city should charge the full cost of providing services or subsidize them," said Dave Bass, city director of administrative services. According to the report, Lake Forest spends about $1.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2013 | By Andrew Khouri
The city of Los Angeles accused banking giants Wells Fargo & Co. and Citigroup Inc. of a “continuous pattern and practice” of mortgage discrimination that led to a wave of foreclosures, reduced property tax revenue and increased costs for city services. In twin lawsuits filed in U.S. District Court, the city alleged that both banks engaged in predatory lending practices and redlining that saddled minorities with loans they couldn't afford and resulted in a disproportionately high number of foreclosures in their neighborhoods compared with white neighborhoods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2013 | By Rick Rojas
Officials in Desert Hot Springs have declared a fiscal emergency in an attempt to avert a second bankruptcy as the Palm Springs-area city approaches insolvency. The City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to approve the emergency declaration, with revenues  expected to fall short of covering the city's expenses by a significant margin. A report prepared by Desert Hot Springs' interim city manager, Robert Adams, said that the city suffers from a "serious structural imbalance" brought about by the economic downturn and decreased development, among other factors.
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