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Ciudad Juarez

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WORLD
February 12, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson
Facing intense political pressure and demands that he resign, President Felipe Calderon traveled Thursday to Mexico's deadliest city to defend his troubled fight against drug cartels, which critics charge has only intensified the violence. Angry crowds greeted Calderon as he arrived in a heavily guarded Ciudad Juarez. The president said it was time to launch a much-discussed expansion of the drug war to include efforts aimed at tackling social issues, such as unemployment and addiction.
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WORLD
November 10, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - Usually, human rights activists and victims are on the same side of a conflict. But the case of Israel Arzate has put the two allies in opposite camps in Mexico, a reflection of how the absence of justice distorts reality in this violent country. Arzate, 28, was one of a small handful of people formally accused by authorities of perpetrating one of the most notorious massacres in recent Mexican history. Fifteen mostly young people were shot to death as they celebrated a soccer victory in the border city of Ciudad Juarez in January 2010.
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NEWS
July 15, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Drug cartel members may be planning attacks at the U.S. border with Mexico and on U.S. Consulate offices in Ciudad Juarez, across the border from El Paso, in retaliation for the arrest this week of an accused drug-cartel leader, the consulate warned Friday. In an emergency message , the consulate Friday advised American citizens to "remain vigilant. " It said: "Information has come to light that suggests a cartel may be targeting the U.S. Consulate in Ciudad Juarez or U.S. Ports of Entry.  In the past, cartels have been willing to utilize car bombs in attacks.
WORLD
October 26, 2013 | By Laura King
CAIRO - Some dared to drive. Others stayed home, but promised to take to the roads another day. Calls for a nationwide “drive-in” to protest Saudi Arabia's de facto ban on women driving were softened at the eleventh hour by organizers, who said Saudi Arabian authorities threatened them with serious consequences if they drove on Saturday. Activists urged female would-be motorists to instead make it an ongoing campaign, and to get behind the wheel whenever they could. They said about 60 women altogether reported they had driven in Saudi Arabia on Saturday, with more than a dozen uploading videos of themselves doing so. Even on a smaller scale than originally envisioned, it was the year's biggest action against the restriction.
WORLD
October 25, 2010 | Times wire services
? Families on Sunday mourned the victims of one of Mexico's worst shootings, weeping over the open coffins of teenagers as young as 14 as Ciudad Juarez residents expressed outrage at the surging violence. Crowding around the bodies in white and gray coffins, parents and friends sobbed as they bid farewell to the 14 people killed at a family birthday party on Friday night in the Mexican city that is the epicenter of the country's drug war. The toll rose from 13 after an 18-year-old victim died of his wounds.
WORLD
September 15, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A Mexican federal special prosecutor assigned in May to investigate 12 years of killings of women in Ciudad Juarez is leaving the job, the attorney general's office announced. Mireille Roccatti, president of the National Human Rights Commission from 1997 to 1999, is to join the Cabinet of recently elected Mexico State Gov. Enrique Pena Nieto of the Institutional Revolutionary Party.
WORLD
November 4, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
An 18-year-old woman was beaten, raped and strangled outside an abandoned house in Ciudad Juarez, a city that has been beset by a string of killings of young women, police said. Authorities received a call from neighbors who reported that a woman was screaming, Mexican police said. Officers arrested Jose Luis Montes, 26, as he fled the scene, police said.
WORLD
May 19, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The police chief of the Mexican border city of Ciudad Juarez has submitted his resignation after a string of killings, including those of some of his top officers, officials said. City spokesman Sergio Belmonte said Public Safety Director Guillermo Prieto would be replaced by a military officer on leave from the armed forces, but did not give a name. Homicide rates have risen in this city across from El Paso, and at least seven police commanders have been killed in suspected drug violence.
WORLD
March 5, 2009 | Tracy Wilkinson and Cecilia Sanchez
A fierce battle between rival drug gangs at a prison in the Mexican border city of Ciudad Juarez on Wednesday left at least 20 inmates dead and three critically wounded, authorities said. It took guards, police and military reinforcements nearly three hours to contain the unrest. Black smoke drifted from the cinder-block prison and helicopters patrolled overhead as anxious families waited outside for news. Most of the victims had been beaten or stabbed to death.
NATIONAL
April 5, 2010 | By Richard A. Serrano
Authorities think he had his fingertips altered to disguise his prints and plastic surgery to mask his face. Except for his dark eyes, federal officials doubt he looks anything like his 12-year-old FBI most wanted photo -- round face, trim mustache and a scar along his cheek. Eduardo Ravelo, known on the street as "Tablas," or "lumber," for his ability to crush, allegedly rules thousands of acolytes in an operation that authorities say specializes in killing, conspiracy, extortion, drug trafficking and money laundering.
WORLD
September 23, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- In a throwback to the violence that long haunted Mexico's border with the United States, 10 people, including a young girl, were shot to death as they celebrated a baseball game victory near Ciudad Juarez, authorities said Monday. At least one gunman and possibly more burst into the party Sunday evening and opened fire with assault rifles on about 30 people who were marking the tournament win of the Cardinals baseball team, the regional prosecutor's office said. Prosecutors said they did not know the motive behind the massacre.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2013 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
Journalist Alfredo Corchado has had a front seat to many of the most important events of recent Mexican history. In the 1980s he covered the protests in Northern Mexico that foreshadowed the end of one-party rule, and he was later a Mexico City correspondent for the Dallas Morning News. In 2000, he conducted the first interview with President-elect Vicente Fox, the opposition candidate who broke the ruling party's 71-year hold on power. And when Mexico's organized crime groups went on a killing spree in the first years of this century, Corchado was among a handful of U.S. reporters working high-level sources inside the U.S. and Mexican governments, trying to make sense of what was going on. Now Corchado has written a memoir based on his experiences: "Midnight in Mexico: A Reporter's Journey Through a Country's Descent Into Darkness.
WORLD
March 7, 2013 | By Daniel Hernandez
MEXICO CITY -- Gunmen shot at the offices of El Diario de Juarez newspaper early Wednesday in the latest attack against a news organization in northern Mexico and days after an editor was killed near the U.S. border. No one was injured when gunmen driving past the paper's Ciudad Juarez offices fired seven rounds from a pistol just after 1 a.m., piercing windows, El Diario reported (link in Spanish). Fifteen minutes later, shots were fired at the city's Canal 44 news station. Nine people were held for questioning late Wednesday in connection with the attack after local authorities and Chihuahua state Gov. Cesar Duarte pledged to find the assailants.
NATIONAL
February 20, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
HOUSTON - The couple, farmers from a village in the Mexican state of Veracruz, had traveled more than 1,200 miles to see their 26-year-old daughter, who was dying from an inoperable spinal tumor. Jose and Ninfa Sanchez, both 48, had applied to cross legally at the Texas border city of Hidalgo under a program called humanitarian parole, designed to allow foreign nationals to come to the United States for emergencies, such as medical crises, court hearings or funerals. It was up to U.S. border officials to decide whether the parents could see their daughter, Maria, before she died.
WORLD
January 31, 2013 | By Daniel Hernandez, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - In the Mexican remake of the popular U.S. TV series "Gossip Girl," the privileged teens at the center of the drama still have it all: stylish clothes, great hair, top-of-the-line sports cars. The types are familiar: Bowtie-wearing Chuck Bass is now known as Max Zaga, and effortlessly chic Serena van der Woodsen is now Sofia Lopez-Haro. The setting is no longer the Upper East Side of Manhattan, but the former "jewel" of the Mexican Riviera, Acapulco. Wait a minute - Acapulco?
WORLD
December 1, 2012 | By Daniel Hernandez
MEXICO CITY -- "Excuse me, Mr. President. I cannot say you are welcome here, because for me, you are not. No one is. " The woman's voice trembled with bitterness and apprehension. She stood just  a few feet away  from a low stage where Mexican President Felipe Calderon, his wife, Margarita Zavala, and top members of his Cabinet were seated at a tightly controlled forum in Ciudad Juarez on  Feb. 11, 2010. "No one is doing anything! I want justice, not just for my children, but for all of the children," she went on. "Juarez is in mourning!"
WORLD
February 27, 2009 | Ken Ellingwood
Amid growing alarm over drug violence in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, the Mexican government will deploy as many as 5,000 more troops to the border city, officials said Thursday. The increase would triple the number of troops and federal police officers operating there as part of President Felipe Calderon's offensive against drug traffickers.
WORLD
December 19, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
A senior Ciudad Juarez police commander's bullet-riddled body was found in the same spot where an apparent hit list naming 26 officers was found days earlier, police said. Roberto Ramirez was the sixth Ciudad Juarez officer killed this week. Ramirez's body was left near a dog racetrack where the corpses of four civilians were found this week, along with the list of officers' names. It was not immediately known if Ramirez's name was on the list.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Amid the rise of the Internet, political partisanship and the media conglomerates, the press may have lost some of its post-"All the President's Men" rumpled luster, but combat reporters remain romantic figures. Particularly the photojournalists, strung with cameras like so many bandoleers, putting themselves in harm's way to get the shot that will explain, better perhaps than words ever could, the impact of war. What drives them to go to places others flee, to risk their lives for a picture?
NATIONAL
October 8, 2011 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
High-powered assault weapons illegally purchased under the ATF's Fast and Furious program in Phoenix ended up in a home belonging to the purported top Sinaloa cartel enforcer in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, whose organization was terrorizing that city with the worst violence in the Mexican drug wars. In all, 100 assault weapons acquired under Fast and Furious were transported 350 miles from Phoenix to El Paso, making that West Texas city a central hub for gun traffickers. Forty of the weapons made it across the border and into the arsenal of Jose Antonio Torres Marrufo, a feared cartel leader in Ciudad Juarez, according to federal court records and trace documents from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.
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