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Civet Cats

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SCIENCE
August 27, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bird flu has killed three rare civet cats at a national park in Vietnam, officials said Friday, the first time the virus has been reported in the species. The Owston civets died in late June at Cuc Phuong National Park, about 75 miles south of Hanoi. Samples sent to a lab in Hong Kong came back positive for the avian influenza H5N1 virus. Most other animals at the park have been tested -- including birds and rats -- but none have been found to have the virus.
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SCIENCE
August 27, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bird flu has killed three rare civet cats at a national park in Vietnam, officials said Friday, the first time the virus has been reported in the species. The Owston civets died in late June at Cuc Phuong National Park, about 75 miles south of Hanoi. Samples sent to a lab in Hong Kong came back positive for the avian influenza H5N1 virus. Most other animals at the park have been tested -- including birds and rats -- but none have been found to have the virus.
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WORLD
November 2, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
China's Health Ministry has banned the cooking and selling of civet cat to prevent a return of severe acute respiratory syndrome, state media reported. Chinese health experts concluded last month that civet, considered a delicacy in the south of the country, was the primary source of last year's SARS epidemic, which killed about 300 people in China and 500 in other countries.
WORLD
November 2, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
China's Health Ministry has banned the cooking and selling of civet cat to prevent a return of severe acute respiratory syndrome, state media reported. Chinese health experts concluded last month that civet, considered a delicacy in the south of the country, was the primary source of last year's SARS epidemic, which killed about 300 people in China and 500 in other countries.
WORLD
August 16, 2003 | From Associated Press
A ban on the sale of civet cats in China has been lifted despite the creatures' possible link to the spread of SARS -- a sign that economic concerns are trumping medical precautions barely a season after the height of the disease. "Starting to sell them in markets again seems to be looking for trouble," Henry Niman, a Harvard University professor who has tracked SARS since its earliest days, said Friday.
WORLD
June 16, 2003 | Sam Howe Verhovek, Times Staff Writer
Two years ago, Zhu Mingda took all his savings, borrowed from relatives and friends, and rented a patch of land in this smoky factory town on the outskirts of Shanghai. Then he went to work, raising civet cats. Caring for civets, with the body of a small fox and a face like a weasel's, is tedious and unending. But the payoff can be huge: Prized for their fur and meat, mature civet cats command as much as $250 apiece.
WORLD
January 8, 2004 | From Associated Press
China reported a second suspected case of SARS on Thursday, even as the country's first confirmed patient of the season was released from the hospital and officials hauled away thousands of civet cats for slaughter in an attempt to prevent further infections. The announcement of the new case by the official New China News Agency said only that a waitress hospitalized in the southern city of Guangzhou was suspected of having severe acute respiratory syndrome.
SCIENCE
May 24, 2003 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Chinese researchers say they may have found the hitherto elusive source of the SARS outbreak, tracking the virus that causes it to civet cats sold in a Guangdong marketplace and eaten by some Chinese as a delicacy.
WORLD
January 5, 2004 | From Associated Press
A Chinese researcher said today that his country's latest suspected SARS patient in southern China definitely has the disease, while Hong Kong researchers linked the case to wild animals. Zhong Nanshan, director of the Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Diseases, told reporters in Hong Kong that the 32-year-old TV producer who fell ill in the southern province of Guangdong has severe acute respiratory syndrome.
SCIENCE
October 1, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Horseshoe bats in China are infected with viruses similar to the SARS virus, suggesting that the bats are the origin of the SARS outbreak that struck Asia in 2002 and 2003, two research teams independently reported this month. Researchers had previously found the virus in civet cats sold in markets as food, and some assumed that those animals were the source. But the World Health Organization cautioned that the virus could not be found widely in wild civets.
WORLD
January 8, 2004 | From Associated Press
China reported a second suspected case of SARS on Thursday, even as the country's first confirmed patient of the season was released from the hospital and officials hauled away thousands of civet cats for slaughter in an attempt to prevent further infections. The announcement of the new case by the official New China News Agency said only that a waitress hospitalized in the southern city of Guangzhou was suspected of having severe acute respiratory syndrome.
WORLD
August 16, 2003 | From Associated Press
A ban on the sale of civet cats in China has been lifted despite the creatures' possible link to the spread of SARS -- a sign that economic concerns are trumping medical precautions barely a season after the height of the disease. "Starting to sell them in markets again seems to be looking for trouble," Henry Niman, a Harvard University professor who has tracked SARS since its earliest days, said Friday.
WORLD
June 16, 2003 | Sam Howe Verhovek, Times Staff Writer
Two years ago, Zhu Mingda took all his savings, borrowed from relatives and friends, and rented a patch of land in this smoky factory town on the outskirts of Shanghai. Then he went to work, raising civet cats. Caring for civets, with the body of a small fox and a face like a weasel's, is tedious and unending. But the payoff can be huge: Prized for their fur and meat, mature civet cats command as much as $250 apiece.
SCIENCE
May 24, 2003 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Chinese researchers say they may have found the hitherto elusive source of the SARS outbreak, tracking the virus that causes it to civet cats sold in a Guangdong marketplace and eaten by some Chinese as a delicacy.
WORLD
January 18, 2004 | Ching-Ching Ni, Times Staff Writer
China confirmed two more cases of SARS on Saturday as millions of people hit the roads during the country's peak travel season, risking a spread of the respiratory disease. The patients, a 20-year-old waitress and a 35-year-old businessman, had already been identified as suspected SARS cases.
WORLD
January 12, 2004 | Ching-Ching Ni, Times Staff Writer
China reported a new suspected case of SARS on Sunday, as health officials in southern China continued working to identify the source of a new outbreak of the respiratory disease that caused a worldwide health alert last year. The new suspected victim is a 35-year-old man, said Dr. Thomas Tsang, a spokesman for the Hong Kong Department of Health.
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