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Civic Forum Organization

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November 27, 1989 | DAN FISHER and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Communist Party of Czechoslovakia and its government were in full retreat Sunday on the eve of a planned two-hour general strike that promised to be the single biggest test of strength yet between the beleaguered authorities and an opposition that seems to grow by the hour. It followed another whirlwind day of political turmoil that included: -- The second purge of hard-liners from the Politburo in three days.
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NEWS
January 8, 1991
Civic Forum, the revolutionary political force that forced out the Communists in 1989, then swept into power in free elections last June, convenes Saturday to ponder its future role as the new democracy struggles through a painful transition. Supporters of President Vaclav Havel fear the Forum has been corrupted by its evolution and want to return to the grass-roots, leaving the burden of politics to increasingly numerous and influential rival parties.
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NEWS
January 14, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A potentially powerful but controversial new political party, described by opponents as a front for the old regime, temporarily banned recent Communist Party defectors from its leading ranks at a sometimes stormy founding congress here Saturday.
NEWS
June 11, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Vaclav Havel's Civic Forum and its allied party in Slovakia were assured Sunday of winning a majority of seats in the Federal Assembly, running far ahead of the second-place Communists in Czechoslovakia's first free elections since 1946. A stunning 96% of the country's 11.2 million registered voters turned out for the election, by a wide margin the broadest public endorsement of democracy so far in any of the Eastern European nations that have held free elections.
NEWS
June 11, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Vaclav Havel's Civic Forum and its allied party in Slovakia were assured Sunday of winning a majority of seats in the Federal Assembly, running far ahead of the second-place Communists in Czechoslovakia's first free elections since 1946. A stunning 96% of the country's 11.2 million registered voters turned out for the election, by a wide margin the broadest public endorsement of democracy so far in any of the Eastern European nations that have held free elections.
NEWS
June 10, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Civic Forum, the pro-democracy group that rose from the streets to oust the Communists from power here last autumn, appeared on its way to a landslide victory Saturday in the first free elections in Czechoslovakia in 44 years. Early projections showed the umbrella organization of 11 parties and human rights movements racking up a 52% majority, which would assure it control of the federal Parliament. The Communists were running well back in third place with 10% of the vote.
NEWS
April 25, 1990 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In an unmistakable, if slightly unsettling, exhibition of the torrid velocity of political development in the Eastern Bloc, a Czechoslovakian campaign manager greeted Hollywood this week--right there in Jane Fonda's living room, at that most refined of California political functions: The chic fund-raiser.
NEWS
January 8, 1991
Civic Forum, the revolutionary political force that forced out the Communists in 1989, then swept into power in free elections last June, convenes Saturday to ponder its future role as the new democracy struggles through a painful transition. Supporters of President Vaclav Havel fear the Forum has been corrupted by its evolution and want to return to the grass-roots, leaving the burden of politics to increasingly numerous and influential rival parties.
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Ladislav Adamec, warning that Czechoslovakia faces the danger of anarchy, said in a nationally televised address Wednesday that he will propose a new government today. He threatened to resign if the Communist Party and opposition forces do not accept his choices. "I cannot bear responsibility for the further development of the situation" if the government does not have "public confidence in the sincerity of our intentions," Adamec said.
NEWS
December 1, 1989 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jaroslav Hutka just didn't fit in after the Prague Spring. Not that he was a political dissident, at least not at first. But the songs he wrote and sang were a bit unorthodox. And with his long hair and beard, he was different from the humorless men who took power in Czechoslovakia after the reform movement of 1968 was crushed. "It was clear to them that I was not one of them," he said Thursday over the kind of lunch that only a few weeks ago he thought he would never have again.
NEWS
June 10, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Civic Forum, the pro-democracy group that rose from the streets to oust the Communists from power here last autumn, appeared on its way to a landslide victory Saturday in the first free elections in Czechoslovakia in 44 years. Early projections showed the umbrella organization of 11 parties and human rights movements racking up a 52% majority, which would assure it control of the federal Parliament. The Communists were running well back in third place with 10% of the vote.
NEWS
June 8, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An air of street festival prevails here on the eve of the first free elections in Czechoslovakia in 44 years. The city is adorned with posters, Vaclav Havel's face beams from half the store windows in town, and hundreds of hawkers peddle campaign buttons for Civic Forum, the mass organization that brought down the hard-line Communist regime here last November.
NEWS
April 25, 1990 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In an unmistakable, if slightly unsettling, exhibition of the torrid velocity of political development in the Eastern Bloc, a Czechoslovakian campaign manager greeted Hollywood this week--right there in Jane Fonda's living room, at that most refined of California political functions: The chic fund-raiser.
NEWS
January 14, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A potentially powerful but controversial new political party, described by opponents as a front for the old regime, temporarily banned recent Communist Party defectors from its leading ranks at a sometimes stormy founding congress here Saturday.
NEWS
January 13, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A growing sense of urgency over putting democratic structures in place emerged here Friday, apparently spurred by concern that events in the Soviet Union may spin out of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's control. "All the information I have, and also my instincts, tell me that the times are such that we must work quickly," President Vaclav Havel told the Slovak National Council in Bratislava.
NEWS
January 11, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the symbol of the Romanian revolution is the national flag with a hole where the Communist emblem has been ripped away, the symbol of Czechoslovakia's political transformation is a "happy face." It comes from the stylized initials in Czech for Civic Forum, the popular movement that rose from nothing to overthrow the hard-line Communist regime last year in a matter of days. The name in Czech is Obcanske Forum , and the "O" is rendered with eyes and a smiling mouth.
NEWS
December 11, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few revolutionaries in history have managed to accomplish what the Czechoslovak opposition pulled off in just three weeks: topple an entrenched, repressive regime with nothing more violent than a firm shove. But as thousands gathered in the city's main Wenceslas Square on Sunday to hear Civic Forum leaders praise the glory of their success, an entirely new set of challenges loomed on the horizon.
NEWS
December 9, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The nation of Czechoslovakia stood on the verge of its first non-Communist government in more than 40 years Friday as intense negotiations finally broke the party's efforts to retain power. "A new coalition will be formed," declared Communist Politburo member Vasil Mohorita, who represented his party at the talks. Echoed Vaclav Klaus, a negotiator from the opposition group Civic Forum: "We agreed on almost everything. You'll hear extraordinary things."
NEWS
December 19, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than a week, this has been a city in celebration, but in recent days the festivities have taken on a strong undertone of nervousness. On Monday, for example, the Ministry of Defense felt compelled to issue a nationally broadcast statement denying widespread rumors of an impending coup. An "entirely irresponsible leaflet campaign," centering on the provincial city of Brno, has talked about a coup in an attempt "to create panic," Defense Ministry spokesman Col. Stanislav Pohorel said.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vaclav Havel, Czechoslovakia's opposition leader and likely future president, appealed in an extraordinary nationally televised address on Saturday for national unity and an end to political maneuvering over the presidential vacancy. The nation, he said, cannot "afford the luxury of waiting and postponement." The debate over the presidency, he added, should be completed "quickly, preferably by the end of the year."
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