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March 11, 1987 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
Medical ethicists and physicians expressed doubt Tuesdaythat the Vatican document opposing means of human procreation woulddeter many American Catholic couples who otherwise would be unable tohave children. Some ethicists also said they were alarmed at the Vatican's call for the enactment of civil laws to ban such techniques as artificial insemination, embryo and sperm banks, surrogate parenthood and "test-tube babies."
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NATIONAL
June 29, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court promises "equal justice under law" - the words carved into stone on its facade - and last week, the justices set out a new definition of equal justice that they see as suited to this time. On the last day of their term, they struck down a 1990s-era federal law that denied all legal recognition to the tens of thousands of same-sex couples who have been legally married in the last decade - a ruling that set off gay rights celebrations from the court's steps to the West Coast.
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NEWS
November 30, 1994 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The case of Lucy Musharbash vs. the California Department of Transportation has nothing to do with violent crime, tougher punishment or any of the other hot-button issues that led to passage of the "three strikes" law. But the personal injury lawsuit has been swept into the judicial system maelstrom created by the legislation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2013 | By Jack Leonard, Los Angeles Times
Alan Jackson, a veteran Los Angeles County prosecutor whose bid to become district attorney ended in defeat in November, is leaving the district attorney's office to join a private, downtown firm that practices civil law. Jackson, 47, said his last day in the office he sought to lead will be Feb. 15. He will pursue a career as a civil litigator with Palmer, Lombardi and Donohue, whose three partners were political supporters of his election campaign....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1993 | RENE LYNCH and DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In an unprecedented move, the 4th District Court of Appeal has temporarily stopped hearing civil cases this month because it is so swamped with criminal and juvenile court appeals. Justices have blamed frivolous appeals, an increasing number of criminal cases, and a state-mandated system that now resolves civil trials sooner for clogging the already-congested appellate court.
NEWS
December 7, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Confronting the man she believes murdered her daughter, Juditha Brown testified against O.J. Simpson on Friday, throwing him hard glances as she described him as nervous, upset and so angry he stared right through her when they met a few hours before Nicole Brown Simpson was killed. Brown's tearful testimony--broken by wrenching sobs as she recounted her daughter's final day--provided the most emotional moments so far in the civil trial against Simpson.
NATIONAL
April 18, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
The judge in the George Zimmerman case recused herself on Wednesday after the defense sought to have her disqualified because her husband worked with a CNN legal affairs analyst who was approached by the defendant to represent him. Seminole Circuit Judge Jessica Recksiedler, the Florida judge assigned to the highly publicized case, announced that she had decided to leave because “the cumulative effect of the events and the totality of the...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2013 | By Jack Leonard, Los Angeles Times
Alan Jackson, a veteran Los Angeles County prosecutor whose bid to become district attorney ended in defeat in November, is leaving the district attorney's office to join a private, downtown firm that practices civil law. Jackson, 47, said his last day in the office he sought to lead will be Feb. 15. He will pursue a career as a civil litigator with Palmer, Lombardi and Donohue, whose three partners were political supporters of his election campaign....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2002 | Tracy Wilson, Times Staff Writer
Seven months after a bitter campaign, former district attorney candidate Ron Bamieh is leaving the prosecutor's office to open his own civil and criminal defense firm. Bamieh said he told superiors of his decision last week. Once a top trial lawyer, he has not prosecuted a serious felony case since the March election won by Chief Assistant Dist. Atty. Greg Totten. "I wanted to run the biggest firm in Ventura," Bamieh said, referring to the district attorney's office.
NEWS
March 1, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American Civil Liberties Union sued Tuesday to overturn a California law that makes it a crime to knowingly file false misconduct charges against police officers. Acting on behalf of an African American man from San Bernardino, the ACLU said in the federal court suit in Los Angeles that the law is having a chilling effect on people who want to complain about alleged police misconduct.
OPINION
October 15, 2012
In the latest chapter of a long-running controversy over anti-Israel protests at UC Berkeley, the U.S. Department of Education has launched an investigation into whether Jewish students at the university are the victims of a "pervasive hostile environment" in violation of federal civil rights laws. Given the importance of free speech, especially in a university setting, the department needs to tread carefully. The department responded to a request from lawyers for two recent Berkeley graduates who earlier had sued the university complaining about a "dangerous anti-Semitic climate" at Berkeley.
NATIONAL
April 18, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
The judge in the George Zimmerman case recused herself on Wednesday after the defense sought to have her disqualified because her husband worked with a CNN legal affairs analyst who was approached by the defendant to represent him. Seminole Circuit Judge Jessica Recksiedler, the Florida judge assigned to the highly publicized case, announced that she had decided to leave because “the cumulative effect of the events and the totality of the...
OPINION
February 9, 2012 | By Timothy Garton Ash
In 1953, the novelist Thomas Mann appealed to an audience of students in Hamburg to strive for "not a German Europe but a European Germany. " This stirring call was endlessly repeated at the time of German unification. Today, we have a variation that few foresaw: a European Germany in a German Europe. Angela Merkel's Berlin republic is a European Germany, in the rich, positive sense in which the great novelist had come to use the term. It is free, civilized, democratic, law-bound, socially and environmentally conscious.
NATIONAL
November 15, 2011
— Catholic Charities announced Monday that it was ending its legal battle over Illinois' civil unions law and no longer was providing state-funded services. The move ends the group's long history in Illinois of providing foster care and adoptions. Catholic Charities held foster care contracts with the state for about four decades. The group had wished to continue its state contracts, while also referring unmarried couples who want to be adoptive or foster parents to other agencies, citing principles of religious liberty and freedom of conscience.
OPINION
March 10, 2011
The Supreme Court this week had good news for a Texas death row inmate: He can sue a district attorney who won't give him access to DNA evidence that might clear him. The 6-3 decision, which opens a new avenue of appeal for condemned prisoners, is welcome. But it falls short of what the court should do to make DNA evidence available to every prisoner who requests it. Henry Skinner was convicted of murdering his girlfriend and her two sons in 1993. He says he was in an alcoholic haze during the killings and that his girlfriend's uncle was probably the killer.
OPINION
August 13, 2010
As California and the United States struggle with the issue of same-sex marriage at the polls and in courtrooms, Latin America is moving more broadly toward acceptance of this basic human right. Last month, Argentina became the first nation in the region to legalize such marriages, granting wedded gay and lesbian couples the same legal rights, responsibilities and protections as heterosexuals. Following suit, senators from the opposition Socialist Party in Chile introduced a bill proposing to remove the "man and woman" clause from the marriage law there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1996 | DADE HAYES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Seeking to avenge the death of a teenager and the wounding of another in a drive-by shooting at Fallbrook Mall, two families have filed a civil lawsuit against all six youths who rode in the car, including three high school girls who escaped criminal charges. It was an unusual drive-by, even by Los Angeles standards: two young men with reputed gang ties out for a night of cruising and drinking with four girls with clean records from comfortable homes south of Ventura Boulevard.
NATIONAL
May 22, 2010 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Tribune Washington Bureau
On Tuesday, Rand Paul was the outsider of the moment. On Friday, he was out in the cold. Few Republicans jumped to the aid of their party's Kentucky U.S. Senate candidate as he took heat Friday for questioning tenets of civil rights legislation and, later, defending the oil company at the center of the epic spill in the Gulf of Mexico by saying "accidents happen." The silence could hardly come as a shock for a candidate who won his primary Tuesday by promising to tear down the establishment.
NATIONAL
January 10, 2009 | David G. Savage
The Supreme Court served notice Friday it may make a far-reaching change in civil rights law this year and knock down a pair of long-standing rules that give special protections to minorities in the workplace and in the voting booth. The justices, after meeting privately, announced they had voted to hear two cases that concern the lingering role of race in American life. The cases could put the court on a collision course with the incoming Obama administration.
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