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NEWS
March 10, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - President Obama intends to nominate career civil-rights attorney Thomas Perez as secretary of Labor, people familiar with the deliberations confirmed Sunday. Perez is an assistant attorney general at the U.S. Department of Justice. If confirmed by the Senate, replacing Hilda L. Solis, who announced her resignation as secretary of Labor in January to return to Southern California. He would be the only Latino Cabinet secretary. A White House announcement of Perez's nomination is expected but not imminent, according to the sources.
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NATIONAL
April 9, 2014 | By Christi Parsons and Kathleen Hennessey
AUSTIN, Texas - President Obama has tried to model Abraham Lincoln's team of rivals and Teddy Roosevelt's power of the bully pulpit. He's lauded Ronald Reagan's communication skills and linked himself to the Kennedy clan. He's praised his onetime nemesis, George W. Bush, as well as his onetime adversary, Bill Clinton. But Obama has rarely cozied up to the predecessor some argue did more than any other modern president to pave the way for his election as the nation's first black president: Lyndon B. Johnson.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1995 | KAY HWANGBO
A lawsuit has been filed against the city of Los Angeles by a Chatsworth couple who were ordered to remove about 800 emus and ostriches from their farm last fall. David and Monica Mohilef filed the complaint, which alleges violation of their constitutional right to due process, on April 7. In October, a city zoning panel ordered the Mohilefs to remove their flightless fowl, saying that dust, feathers and odors from the farm were creating an undue hardship for their Monteria Estates neighbors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
California Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye told the Legislature on Monday that the closure of budget-strapped courts has deprived more than 2 million residents of accessible justice and left the state on the verge of a "civil rights crisis. " "A one-way, three-hour trip to a courthouse can't be fair in anyone's book," Cantil-Sakauye said in her annual address to state lawmakers. California court budgets in the last several years have been cut by about $1 billion, and Cantil-Sakauye has been pleading with legislators to restore more funding next year.
NEWS
June 13, 1995 | MELISSA HEALY and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Republican critics of affirmative action hailed Monday's Supreme Court decision as a mandate for even more sweeping action by Congress and vowed to press home their attack on federal programs of racial preference.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1997
Katherine "Kit" Tremaine, 89, an author, philanthropist and social activist who was on Richard Nixon's enemies list. During her lifetime, Tremaine donated about $30 million to Democratic political candidates and causes. She campaigned against the Vietnam War in the 1960s, standing in silent protest once a week outside the Santa Barbara Museum of Art. In 1973, she learned that she was on Nixon's list because of her support of Democrats and opposition to the war.
OPINION
February 20, 2013
Re "Harry Truman, Lincoln's heir," Opinion, Feb. 17 Robert Shogan is correct that President Harry S. Truman did more for the cause of African American rights than his predecessor Franklin D. Roosevelt or his successor Dwight D. Eisenhower. Yet Shogan is unfair to Lincoln's Republican successors, who had better records than Democratic presidents before Roosevelt. He quotes W.E.B. DuBois in 1922 as commenting that neither Republican nor Democratic presidential candidates were to be trusted, without noting that DuBois in 1912 made the mistake of supporting Democrat Woodrow Wilson, who segregated the federal civil service - the worst act of any post-Civil War president.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
As anyone who's watched even a few minutes of A&E's reality hit "Duck Dynasty" can tell you, Phil Robertson is a pretty conservative guy.  But in an interview published in January's GQ Magazine , the duck call inventor and Roberston family patriarch  goes on record with comments about the sinfulness of gays and black people under Jim Crow that are about as forward-thinking as his Old Testament facial hair.  In the profile, an unedited Robertson...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2013 | By Liesl Bradner
What's remarkable about photojournalist Leonard Freed's book "This Is the Day: The March on Washington" (Getty: $29.95), a photo essay documenting the historic Aug. 28, 1963, civil-rights march, is that it includes only one photograph of Martin Luther King Jr. A wide-angle shot of the crowd gathered at the base of the Lincoln Memorial shows a barely discernible King at the podium giving his celebrated "I Have a Dream" speech. Freed's "focus was on seeing the event from multiple points of view, from students to clergy to the national park rangers," said Paul Farber, instructor of urban studies at the University of Pennsylvania who worked closely with the photographer's widow, Brigitte, to select 75 images from his archive of 500 black-and-white photos (Freed died in 2006)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2009 | Robert Hilburn
If there was still skepticism six months ago that an African American could be elected president of the United States, imagine how unlikely the prospect felt to Nat King Cole a half-century ago when he recorded the song "We Are Americans Too." Cole's recording session came just one month after some white supremacists assaulted him on stage during a concert in April 1956 in Montgomery, Ala. He never performed another concert in the South.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- A federal judge has rejected a civil rights lawsuit filed by a man arrested on suspicion of violating the city's anti-nudity ordinance for wearing a "gladiator-type black leather loinclo th " at an LGBT Pride activity. William X. Walters argued that he was targeted because he is gay while police allow women to wear even more revealing thongs at local beaches and at the annual Over-the-Line tournament at Fiesta Island. Though evidence showed that Walters may be the only person ever arrested for violating the ordinance without being entirely naked, that does not prove that he was targeted because he is gay, the judge ruled.
OPINION
March 12, 2014 | Patt Morrison
At the top of the big whiteboard in his office, Andre Birotte Jr. has written "BHAGS," by which he means his aspirations as U.S. attorney for seven Southern California counties: "big hairy audacious goals. " He's already hit some audacious personal goals, this son of Haitian immigrants. He's made his way from the L.A. public defender's office to inspector general of the Los Angeles Police Department to private practice, and, since 2010, to chief of the most populous U.S. attorney's district in the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
Do yourself a favor: If you care about American politics and race relations and you haven't already seen “12 Years a Slave,” go see it. You will not be sorry. The brutal tale of a 19th century American black man's descent from freedom into slavery deservedly won the best picture Oscar on Sunday. But it hasn't done nearly as well at the American box office as it should have. It has grossed about $49 million in the United States, a relatively modest amount compared with multi-Oscar winner “Gravity,” which has taken in close to $270 million domestically.
SPORTS
February 25, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
The U.S. Department of Education's Office of Civil Rights has launched an investigation how the University of Michigan handled rape allegations against a former football player. The department notified former Michigan professor Douglas Smith of the investigation in an email late Monday . Smith filed a complaint with the department about the matter in August 2013. “OCR has determined it is appropriate to proceed to investigation on the following issue,” the office said in an email to Smith obtained by The Times, “that the University failed to promptly and equitably respond to complaints, reports and/or incidents of sexual violence of which it had notice and, as a result, students were subjected to a sexually hostile environment.” The email noted investigation of Smith's complaint will be consolidated with another unidentified complaint filed about the situation and will also include examination of the university's Title IX grievance procedure.
NATIONAL
February 6, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
On a straight party-line vote Thursday, the Senate Judiciary Committee approved civil rights lawyer Debo Adegbile's nomination to head the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division. Adegbile, a longtime voting-rights specialist for the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, had drawn opposition, in particular from Philadelphia officials, because of his representation of Mumia Abu-Jamal, a convicted cop-killer there. The Fraternal Order of Police called the nomination “a thumb in the eye of our nation's law enforcement officers.” Other law enforcement groups, the police officer's widow and, most recently, Philadelphia Dist.
OPINION
February 6, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Debo Adegbile, President Obama's nominee to head the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division, is an experienced litigator and specialist in civil rights law. In a rational world, he would receive unanimous confirmation. But as the Senate Judiciary Committee prepares to vote on his nomination, Adegbile faces opposition from conservatives who don't like his legal philosophy and a law enforcement group that won't forgive him for participating in the appeal of a man convicted of killing a police officer.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2009 | Paul West and Richard Simon
Thomas Perez is Maryland's highest-ranking Latino, but his selection as the nation's leading civil rights enforcer has provoked sharp criticism from some Latino civil rights advocates. The criticism isn't directed at Perez, the state's secretary of labor and a first-generation Dominican American, or his qualifications.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2014 | By Paige St. John
SACRAMENTO -- California's refusal to let former state prison inmates vote while they serve community probation terms is under challenge by civil rights groups. On behalf of groups including the League of Women Voters of California, lawyers from the American Civil Liberties Union Foundation of Northern California and the San Francisco-based Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights on Tuesday filed a lawsuit against California Secretary of State Debra Bowen. The Alameda County Superior Court lawsuit alleges Bowen wrongly told county election supervisors in 2011 that former state prisoners remain ineligible to vote until they finish their probation sentences.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014 | By Claudia Luther, This article has been corrected, as indicated below.
Pete Seeger was a teenager in the 1930s when he heard an Appalachian balladeer perform on an old-fashioned, five-string banjo and fell in love with the instrument, the timeless melodies and, most of all, the words. "Compared to the trivialities of most popular songs," he said later, "the words of these songs had all the meat of human life in them.... They seemed frank, straightforward, honest. " In time, Seeger would arm himself with a banjo, a guitar and the transformative power of music to battle injustice in America and become the folk legend behind numbers such as "We Shall Overcome," "Where Have All the Flowers Gone" and "Turn!
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