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Civil Rights Nicaragua

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January 22, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
The Nicaraguan government Thursday offered to establish an international commission, including members of the U.S. Republican and Democratic parties, to monitor the political rights of Contras who put down their guns and join Nicaragua's internal political opposition. Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs Victor Hugo Tinoco said the Sandinistas also would not object if the Contras continue to receive humanitarian aid from the United States once a cease-fire has been declared.
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NEWS
January 22, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
The Nicaraguan government Thursday offered to establish an international commission, including members of the U.S. Republican and Democratic parties, to monitor the political rights of Contras who put down their guns and join Nicaragua's internal political opposition. Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs Victor Hugo Tinoco said the Sandinistas also would not object if the Contras continue to receive humanitarian aid from the United States once a cease-fire has been declared.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1985
Dugger expresses a legitimate concern that the recent suspension of civil rights in Nicaragua by the Sandinista government may become permanent in the face of attacks by the contra army that is attempting to overthrow it. He points to Cuba and the Soviet Union to illustrate how civil liberties abroad have been betrayed. The article begins with a thoughtful question: What should Americans do about the U.S.-financed contra war and the recent suspension of basic liberties? However, Dugger answers this question with a disappointing backhanded slap to the American left, by stating that the American public should find out if Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega is "just another dictator" before, "once again, the American left betrays the cause of civil liberties abroad."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1985
The suspension of civil rights in Nicaragua should cause grave concern even among that country's stalwart supporters. Emergency measures are more easily imposed than withdrawn. But before we join White House spokesman Larry Speakes in lambasting that unfortunate country, I suggest we all examine the cause of this situation. Nicaragua is reeling from a U.S. trade embargo, the blocking of desperately needed international loans by the United States and the $1.5-billion damage inflicted on it by the CIA-directed contras.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1999 | MARGARET RAMIREZ
In assessing the impact of Pentecostalism in Latin America, Bolivian lawyer and religious liberties expert Pedro C. Moreno has painted the region as a society of paradoxes. "It is a land of deep religiosity, but substantial official corruption. Saturated with macho types, but not enough responsible men. With a ruling class ethnically mestizo (mix of Indian and European), but, out of prejudice, considering itself white.
NEWS
January 18, 1988 | MELISSA HEALY and JOSH GETLIN, Times Staff Writers
Reagan Administration officials, unmoved by Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega's day-old promises to abide by the terms of a Central American peace proposal, said Sunday they will soon ask Congress to approve by early February a new military aid package for the Nicaraguan Contras. "The President is committed to supporting the Resistance," White House spokesman Roman Popadiuk said, adding that a funding request should reach lawmakers early next week.
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