Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCivil Rights Violations
IN THE NEWS

Civil Rights Violations

NATIONAL
December 17, 2005 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
The Senate on Friday blocked legislation to renew the Patriot Act, delivering a dramatic rebuff to President Bush that reflected rising concern over his treatment of civil liberties and privacy rights in the war on terrorism. A Republican bid to end debate and consider a bill that the House easily approved this week fell seven votes short, leaving the fate of the anti-terrorism law unclear as Congress prepared to recess. Key provisions of the statute are to expire Dec. 31.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
August 16, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Authorities offered a reward of up to $25,000 and established a tip line in an attempt to solve the slayings of two Florida civil rights pioneers whose home was blown up on Christmas night in 1951. The investigation into the deaths of Harry T. and Harriette V. Moore has been revived periodically, most recently by Atty. Gen. Charlie Crist.
NATIONAL
July 8, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Two men convicted of trying to drive a black family out of the predominantly white community of Nine Mile, burning a cross in the family's yard and hanging a noose on the door, were sentenced in Jacksonville to nearly two years in federal prison. Jeremy Kratzer, 25, and Ricky Hobbs, 23, earlier were found guilty of conspiring to violate the civil rights of Deborah Edwards and her four children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2005 | Matt Lait and Scott Glover, Times Staff Writers
The FBI has launched an investigation into allegations that Hermosa Beach police officers roughed up and falsely arrested three area residents last spring and then lied in police reports and in court to justify their actions. At least two of the three said they have been interviewed by agents in recent weeks.
WORLD
January 15, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A special commission investigating human rights abuses by Nigerian governments has found three former military rulers responsible for unlawful killings. The findings of the so-called Oputa Panel were suppressed by the government for three years and were published for the first time by a civil society group on the Internet this month.
WORLD
January 15, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A former Argentine navy officer who once admitted to killing political opponents by throwing them from airplanes during his country's 1976-83 "dirty war" became the first person to be tried in Spain for crimes against humanity committed in another nation. Adolfo Scilingo, 58, who has been on a hunger strike since mid-December, arrived at Madrid's National Court in an ambulance and suffered a dizzy spell, forcing the first session to start late and end early.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The American Civil Liberties Union has sued the FBI, seeking more information about the agency's questioning of Muslims and Arabs as it investigates the possibility of pre-election terror attacks. The ACLU -- which calls the unannounced interviews at homes, workplaces and mosques "interrogations" -- is seeking FBI documents under the Freedom of Information Act about whether the government is protecting the constitutional rights of those interviewed.
NATIONAL
August 26, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal judge in Miami threw out a lawsuit claiming federal agents used excessive force in an armed raid to seize Elian Gonzalez at the home of his Miami relatives four years ago. An order issued by U.S. District Judge Marcia Cooke concluded the six agents who conducted the raid were legally immune to the lawsuit, and she found no constitutional violations. "We're pleased with the judge's decision," said Justice Department spokesman Charles Miller. The family was considering an appeal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2004 | David Rosenzweig, Times Staff Writer
Four alleged members of a Latino street gang that waged a campaign of terror against African Americans in Highland Park have been indicted on federal weapons and civil rights charges, including the racially motivated slaying of a black motorist, the U.S. attorney's office announced Friday. Prosecutors said the four, who could face the death penalty if convicted, are members of a clique of the Avenues street gang, which has been a fixture on the Eastside of Los Angeles for 50 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2004 | Jean Guccione, Times Staff Writer
A federal appellate panel ruled Friday that three former inmates held in Los Angeles County Jail for as long as 29 1/2 hours beyond their ordered releases are entitled to their day in court. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals reversed a judge's dismissal of their claims and ordered that a jury be allowed to decide whether the constitutional rights of the former inmates were violated by their prolonged incarceration.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|