Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCivil Rights Violations
IN THE NEWS

Civil Rights Violations

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2006 | Lee Romney, Times Staff Writer
Four years after federal investigators began probing civil rights violations at California's mental hospitals, prosecutors filed a consent decree in federal court in Los Angeles on Tuesday that lays out a road map for sweeping reform under a court-appointed monitor.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
February 20, 2006 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
For Americans troubled by the prospect of federal agents eavesdropping on their phone conversations or combing through their Internet records, there is good news: A little-known board exists in the White House whose purpose is to ensure that privacy and civil liberties are protected in the fight against terrorism. Someday, it might actually meet. Initially proposed by the bipartisan commission that investigated the attacks of Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2006 | Jessica Garrison, Times Staff Writer
Jesse Lee Peterson, a Los Angeles minister and black conservative, has been a thorn in the side of civil rights leader Jesse Jackson for years. A former talk radio host and perennial cable TV guest, Peterson in a 2002 online article called Jackson a "has-been civil rights 'leader.' " And for five years in a row he said he staged a "National Day of Repudiation of Jesse Jackson" rally in Los Angeles.
NATIONAL
December 17, 2005 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
The Senate on Friday blocked legislation to renew the Patriot Act, delivering a dramatic rebuff to President Bush that reflected rising concern over his treatment of civil liberties and privacy rights in the war on terrorism. A Republican bid to end debate and consider a bill that the House easily approved this week fell seven votes short, leaving the fate of the anti-terrorism law unclear as Congress prepared to recess. Key provisions of the statute are to expire Dec. 31.
NATIONAL
August 16, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Authorities offered a reward of up to $25,000 and established a tip line in an attempt to solve the slayings of two Florida civil rights pioneers whose home was blown up on Christmas night in 1951. The investigation into the deaths of Harry T. and Harriette V. Moore has been revived periodically, most recently by Atty. Gen. Charlie Crist.
NATIONAL
July 8, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Two men convicted of trying to drive a black family out of the predominantly white community of Nine Mile, burning a cross in the family's yard and hanging a noose on the door, were sentenced in Jacksonville to nearly two years in federal prison. Jeremy Kratzer, 25, and Ricky Hobbs, 23, earlier were found guilty of conspiring to violate the civil rights of Deborah Edwards and her four children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2005 | Matt Lait and Scott Glover, Times Staff Writers
The FBI has launched an investigation into allegations that Hermosa Beach police officers roughed up and falsely arrested three area residents last spring and then lied in police reports and in court to justify their actions. At least two of the three said they have been interviewed by agents in recent weeks.
WORLD
January 15, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A special commission investigating human rights abuses by Nigerian governments has found three former military rulers responsible for unlawful killings. The findings of the so-called Oputa Panel were suppressed by the government for three years and were published for the first time by a civil society group on the Internet this month.
WORLD
January 15, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A former Argentine navy officer who once admitted to killing political opponents by throwing them from airplanes during his country's 1976-83 "dirty war" became the first person to be tried in Spain for crimes against humanity committed in another nation. Adolfo Scilingo, 58, who has been on a hunger strike since mid-December, arrived at Madrid's National Court in an ambulance and suffered a dizzy spell, forcing the first session to start late and end early.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The American Civil Liberties Union has sued the FBI, seeking more information about the agency's questioning of Muslims and Arabs as it investigates the possibility of pre-election terror attacks. The ACLU -- which calls the unannounced interviews at homes, workplaces and mosques "interrogations" -- is seeking FBI documents under the Freedom of Information Act about whether the government is protecting the constitutional rights of those interviewed.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|