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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2011 | By Victoria Kim and Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
With the conviction this week of Michael Jackson's doctor on an involuntary manslaughter charge, the question of blame in the pop star's death shifts to a new and much wealthier defendant: Los Angeles entertainment behemoth Anschutz Entertainment Group. The conclusion of the criminal case sets the stage for proceedings in civil court, where the pop star's mother and children are pressing a wrongful death suit against the corporation and its concert subsidiary, AEG Live, the promoter of Jackson's doomed comeback attempt.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2014 | By Richard Winton
A Santa Monica jury has awarded a female news producer $5.42 million after finding that a West Hollywood nightclub was negligent in the sexual assault on her in a club restroom. The 43-year-old woman sued the Here Lounge and club worker Victor Cruz, saying that she was assaulted and raped by him March 23, 2009. The Times is not identifying her because she is a victim of a sex crime. After a 15-day trial in Santa Monica Superior Court, jurors found that Cruz committed a sexual offense that harmed the woman and that Here Lounge's negligence was a substantial factor in causing that harm.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2009 | Carol J. Williams
A Los Angeles federal judge took the highly unusual step of closing a two-day trial this week in a case involving the 2005 prison killing of Jewish Defense League activist Earl Krugel. Constitutional scholars and press-freedom advocates deemed the broad secrecy accorded the trial by U.S. District Judge Stephen V. Wilson perplexing -- and a likely violation of the 1st Amendment. Wilson issued a protective order covering U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2013 | By Andrew Blankstein and Jeff Gottlieb
Paris Jackson's apparent suicide attempt comes as her family and AEG are locked in a legal battle over the death of her father, Michael Jackson. Paris Jackson is a possible witness in the civil trial. The suit filed by Katherine Jackson, Michael Joseph Jackson Jr., Prince Michael Jackson II as well as Paris Jackson alleges that AEG negligently hired and supervised Dr. Conrad Murray, who -- in an attempt to help the singer sleep -- gave him a fatal dose of the anesthetic propofol.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the most sweeping decision of its kind, a state appeals court in Los Angeles has ruled that public access to civil trials is a fundamental, constitutionally guaranteed right. In a 28-page opinion handed down late Tuesday, the 2nd District of the state Court of Appeal overturned a Burbank judge's order barring the media and public from the courtroom when the jury hearing a civil trial is not present.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1992 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Invoking the Fifth Amendment privilege against self-incrimination, Charles H. Keating Jr. refused to answer questions Wednesday in federal court about charges that he swindled investors in Lincoln Savings & Loan's parent company out of $285 million. Keating, former owner of the failed thrift, declined to answer about 50 questions from five lawyers because his testimony could be used against him in a federal criminal case filed in Los Angeles charging him with fraud, conspiracy and racketeering.
NEWS
October 24, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys out to prove O.J. Simpson a killer unfolded their cases before attentive jurors Wednesday, promising to use tapes and photos never before seen in court, along with familiar blood and fiber evidence, in their effort to incriminate him. Above all, they plan to use Simpson's own words, both in an early interview with police and a 10-day deposition, to try to prove him responsible for the June 12, 1994, murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Lyle Goldman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2004 | From Times Staff Reports
A civil trial is scheduled to begin today in a Ventura courtroom to determine whether several former San Bernardino County officials and the businessmen who allegedly conspired with them on bribery and kickback schemes must pay the county more than $3 million in damages and restitution. The defendants include former Chief Administrative Officers James Hlawek and Harry Mays, who have pleaded guilty to federal criminal charges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robert Blake won't be getting a new trial in the wrongful death of his wife, Bonny Lee Bakley. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge David M. Schacter on Monday denied the actor's motion to throw out the $30-million jury verdict. Blake, who was acquitted of Bakley's 2001 murder in criminal court, had accused jurors in the civil trial of misconduct. Attorney Eric J. Dubin, who represents Bakley's family, said the ruling "was absolutely fair."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1996 | HELEN GALVIN, Helen Galvin, a freelance writer in Altadena, is working on a mystery novel
Television has sunk to a new low with E! Television's coverage of the O.J. Simpson civil trial ("E! Acts Out a Way to Cover Simpson," Calendar, Oct. 24).
BUSINESS
June 1, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien, Los Angeles Times
For a company that beat down prices of online music, Apple Inc. finds itself in the odd situation of defending itself against government claims that it conspired to fix prices for electronic books. Starting Monday, the Justice Department will lay out in a civil antitrust trial its accusations that Apple masterminded a cartel with publishers to raise prices in an e-book market in which the Cupertino, Calif., company remains a bit player compared with rival Amazon.com Inc. As opening statements begin, perhaps the biggest question hovering over the proceedings is this: Why is this case even going to trial?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
Like almost everyone besides the Brown and Goldman families, I spend no time thinking about O.J. Simpson and his starring role in one of the most painful chapters in Los Angeles criminal history. His acquittal at the end of a traumatic 1995 murder trial featuring a defense “dream team” that ran roughshod over subpar prosecutors, was followed in 1997 by a civil trial in which he was found liable for the deaths of his ex-wife Nicole Brown and her friend, Ronald Goldman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2013 | By Corina Knoll
With the Michael Jackson wrongful death civil trial around the corner, attorneys argued Thursday about a number of issues, including whether to unseal the music legend's medical records and preclude certain testimony from expert witnesses. The wrongful death suit filed by Jackson's mother and three children accuses AEG's concert promotions arm of hiring and controlling Dr. Conrad Murray, who administered the fatal dose of propofol to the pop singer. Jackson died in 2009, shortly before he was scheduled to appear in a series of comeback shows in London.
NATIONAL
February 25, 2013 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
NEW ORLEANS - Energy giant BP, behind schedule and $50 million over budget drilling a deep-water well, emphasized cost-cutting over safety, causing the largest offshore oil spill in U.S. history, lawyers said Monday as the company's high-stakes civil trial began. Lawyers used PowerPoint presentations to provide a dramatic recounting of the April 20, 2010, explosion and fire in the Gulf of Mexico that killed 11 crew members. Workers were preparing to temporarily cap the Macondo well 4,100 feet underwater when it blew up. The 30-story drilling vessel about 50 miles offshore burned for two days before crumpling into the gulf.
NATIONAL
February 19, 2013 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
With the ink barely dry on the record-breaking $4-billion check BP wrote to settle criminal charges stemming from its Gulf of Mexico oil spill disaster, the energy giant now faces a protracted court battle that could cost it billions more. The civil trial scheduled to begin next week could expose BP to about $17 billion in fines for violating the Clean Water Act. If imposed, the fine would be the largest environmental penalty in U.S. history. The first phase of the nonjury trial will focus on the cause of the April 20, 2010, explosion that killed 11 people and spewed an estimated 4 million barrels of oil into the gulf over 84 days.
NATIONAL
November 16, 2012 | By Michael Muskal and Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- BP has accepted criminal responsibility for the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, a move that it said has put the criminal part of one of the nation's worst environmental disasters in the rear-view mirror. Even if that is true, and the government has insisted that its criminal probe is ongoing, BP's troubles are far from over. On the horizon is a civil case that could cost the company billions of dollars more, as well as continuing concerns by lawmakers about how to safeguard the nation's environment and regulate a key industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1986 | John Spano
Twenty-three-year-old Kim Andreasson was just beginning to overcome a series of threatening health problems when she died after dental surgery performed by Tony Protopappas in 1982, the dead woman's mother testified Wednesday. Ulla Isaksen, 55, told jurors that her daughter had stabilized after years of "constant" hospitalizations from age 13, when Kim's chronic kidney failure, anemia, high blood pressure and lupus erythematosus were first diagnosed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1996
In the most sweeping decision of its kind, a state appeals court in Los Angeles has ruled that public access to civil trials is a fundamental, constitutionally guaranteed right. In a 28-page opinion handed down late Tuesday, the 2nd District of the state Court of Appeal overturned a Burbank judge's order barring the media and public from the courtroom when the jury hearing a civil trial is not present.
NATIONAL
July 19, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
High noon is approaching for Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio. A civil trial against the Arizona law enforcement official -- known for his tough stance on illegal immigration -- begins in Phoenix today, with foes accusing him of racial profiling and of illegally discriminating against Latinos.  Groups led by the American Civil Liberties Union are suing Arpaio and the state's most populous county, charging that they targeted Latinos as part of...
SPORTS
March 7, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Kevin Gross on Wednesday urged attorneys for Bryan Stow and the Dodgers to settle their dispute without his intervention. Stow is the San Francisco Giants fan who was beaten and critically injured in the Dodger Stadium parking lot on opening day last year. His attorneys filed a civil suit against the Dodgers in Los Angeles Superior Court and a subsequent claim against the team in Bankruptcy Court. They have said Stow will need lifelong medical care and cited $50 million as a "conservative total estimate" of his damages.
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